46

This question already has an answer here:

I'm trying to calculate a proportional height (while excluding a static height element) from a width that gets passed in via a request (defaults to 560).

However, wF.h evaluates to NaN. If I replace this.w with 560 it works, but not when trying to reference the w property of wF.

var wF = {
       w : 560,
       h : (312 - 42) / (560 / this.w) + 42
};

What gives?

I refuse to use two plain vars in succession, because I'm trying to get nice code out of JS.

Update:

Thanks to everyone who helped explain and solve my problem. I guess i'll just have to get used to that. I'll be setting the object up in stages to get on with the project, even though it still annoys me slightly ;). I found and read a nice article on the topic for anyone who stumbles upon similar issues: http://yehudakatz.com/2011/08/11/understanding-javascript-function-invocation-and-this/

marked as duplicate by epascarello javascript Dec 13 '16 at 13:12

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • what version of ecmascript? i dont think this is javascript – naveen Aug 12 '11 at 16:51
  • var wF = {---} does the same thing. – mhe Aug 12 '11 at 16:53
  • i am happy that you noticed. any initialization as object needs new (your constructor). and so your object declaration is wrong – naveen Aug 12 '11 at 17:00
  • while you are technically right it doesn't really relate to my problem. – mhe Aug 12 '11 at 17:06
  • i thought you said nice code :) – naveen Aug 12 '11 at 17:07
61
// Your code
var wF = {
       w : 560,
       h : (312 - 42) / (560 / this.w) + 42
};

this isn't what you think it is

Javascript has no block scope, only function scope: this inside the definition for wF does not refer to wF.

(And so this.w, whatever this is, is likely undefined. Dividing by undefined yields NaN.)

So then you might try:

// Let's not use `this`
var wF = {
       w : 560,
       h : (312 - 42) / (560 / wF.w) + 42
};

You haven't finished defining the object yet

However, you're still defining the object where you attempt to use wF.w: it's not ready for that yet.


Solution

So, yes, you will have to use two variables... or set up the object in stages:

// We can't even use `wF`; split up the property definitions
var wF = {};
wF.w = 560;
wF.h = (312 - 42) / (560 / wF.w) + 42;
22

Hi just redefine your second property as a function object and it will work. I think it is possible to access the context of the calling object from within a function

var wF = {
    w : 560,
    h : function() { return (312 - 42) / (560 / this.w) + 42; }
};

alert(wF.h())
  • 3
    I could not get this to work with arrow function, but this did work! – kentrh Dec 18 '17 at 13:36
  • 2
    It will not work with arrow function, as the arrow function does not have its own this - it uses this from parent function context. – holmicz Mar 1 '18 at 16:03
  • You actually can get the arrow function to work: { matches: { played: 5, won: 4, draw: 0, lost: 1 }, points: () => (this.matches.won * 3) + (this.matches.draw * 1) } . This works inside an array of objects, this isn't evaluated until you call the function. – thatgibbyguy Sep 21 '18 at 2:57
  • @thatgibbyguy. I haven't tried with an array member. thanks for sharing! I learned something :-) – houss Sep 22 '18 at 3:31
  • @thatgibbyguy I don't think that works at all. Arrow functions do not have their own this => see: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… In your ex the this.matches.won and this.matches.draw will be taken from window/global object. So, say you have: var test = { matches: { played: 5, won: 4, draw: 0, lost: 1 }, points: () => (this.matches.won * 3) + (this.matches.draw * 1) } , calling test.points() throws error: "Uncaught TypeError: Cannot read property 'won' of undefined" – Rui Carvalho Sep 26 '18 at 12:12
3

The this keyword refers to the calling context, not an object.

You need to do this in two steps like so:

var wF = { w: 560 };
wF.h = (312 - 42) / (560 / wF.w) + 42;
  • you are right of course, and at least it will build object properties instead of plain variables, but it's got me really frustrated that i have to do this procedually :D – mhe Aug 12 '11 at 17:18
  • If you prefer the OO way, then create an object with getters and setters. This way you can use this.getW() in the definition of the getH() function. – Paul Perigny Aug 12 '11 at 17:22
  • And vastly overcomplicate your code. Potentially. – Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 12 '11 at 17:32
1

You don't need to wrap the {...} in an Object(). It is already an object literal.

this doesn't operate inside the object literal, it will point to the object that the function is currently running in so:

function fn() {
   var wF = { w : 560, h : (312 - 42) / (560 / this.w) + 42 };
}

fn();

will cause this to point to the window object.

EDIT: Previous code was not intended to be an answer, just a demonstration of what this is. Another possiblity would be to use a function that takes the width as an argument:

function getObject(width) {
    width = width || 560; //Default value to 560
    return { w: width, h : (312 - 42) / (560 / width) + 42 };
}

var wF = getObject(); //To get the default value, or specify a width otherwise.
  • 1
    @AlienWebguy Right, because it's trying to divide by this.w, which is window.w, which is undefined. – Dennis Aug 12 '11 at 17:01
  • This is a good partial explanation of the problem, but there is no solution here. – Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 12 '11 at 17:15
  • This answer is unhelpful - please test your code before posting it. – Nick Husher Aug 12 '11 at 17:17
  • @TeslaNick: It's not meant as an answer, apparently. It's a demonstration of why this is wrong inside the object literal. – Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 12 '11 at 17:21
  • @Nick Tomalak is correct. I added some code that does work. – Dennis Aug 12 '11 at 17:46
-1

When you use this in a JSON object declaration, it points to the current instance.

You can try this code in your console to understand it better:

Object({ w : 560, h : (312 - 42) / (560 / function(e){console.log(e);return e.w;}(this)) + 42 });
  • This code proves that this is window because, no, it does not "point to the current instance" at all. – Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 12 '11 at 17:15
  • Because you are running it on window context. I mean when he used this.w, this doesn´t point to wf. – Adilson de Almeida Jr Aug 12 '11 at 17:20

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