12

I have age columns like so that are dummy encoded. How can I transform these columns to one column using dplyr?

Input:

  age_0-10 age_11-20 age_21-30 age_31-40 age_41-50 age_51-60 gender
1 0        1         0         0         0         0         0
2 0        0         1         0         0         0         1
3 0        0         0         1         0         0         0
4 0        1         0         0         0         0         1
5 0        0         0         0         0         1         1

Expected output:

age         gender
1 11-20     0
2 21-30     1
3 31-40     0
4 11-20     1
5 51-60     1
1

4 Answers 4

7

A possible solution, now, thanks to @Adam's comment, with names_prefix:

library(tidyverse)

df <- data.frame(
  check.names = FALSE,
  `age_0-10` = c(0L, 0L, 0L, 0L, 0L),
  `age_11-20` = c(1L, 0L, 0L, 1L, 0L),
  `age_21-30` = c(0L, 1L, 0L, 0L, 0L),
  `age_31-40` = c(0L, 0L, 1L, 0L, 0L),
  `age_41-50` = c(0L, 0L, 0L, 0L, 0L),
  `age_51-60` = c(0L, 0L, 0L, 0L, 1L),
  gender = c(0L, 1L, 0L, 1L, 1L)
)

df %>% 
  pivot_longer(col=starts_with("age"), names_to="age", names_prefix="age_") %>% 
  filter(value==1) %>%
  select(age, gender, -value)

#> # A tibble: 5 × 2
#>   age   gender
#>   <chr>  <int>
#> 1 11-20      0
#> 2 21-30      1
#> 3 31-40      0
#> 4 11-20      1
#> 5 51-60      1
7
  • 1
    If you use names_prefix = "age_" in the pivot_longer() statement you can remove the final mutate() line.
    – user10917479
    Commented Dec 21, 2021 at 14:34
  • 1
    Thanks, @Adam, to let me know that! names_prefix had escaped to my mind. I have edited my answer accordingly. Good point, Adam!
    – PaulS
    Commented Dec 21, 2021 at 14:38
  • 1
    No problem! There are so many little options in those functions it's hard to keep track of. I just happen to be doing a lot of pivoting recently, so it is all fresh in my mind.
    – user10917479
    Commented Dec 21, 2021 at 14:39
  • 1
    This is great! If the age columns had a suffix, lets say age_0-10_col, age_11-20_col, etc.. how could i get rid of the suffix?
    – Eisen
    Commented Dec 21, 2021 at 15:17
  • 1
    Thanks, @Peter Mortensen, for your comment. Honestly, I do not think such an explanation is really needed. However, if you think it really needed, please you are welcome to insert yourself that explanation.
    – PaulS
    Commented Dec 22, 2021 at 11:42
4

Here is a way in dplyr using c_across().

library(dplyr)
library(stringr)

df %>% 
  rowwise() %>% 
  mutate(age = str_remove(names(.)[which(c_across(starts_with("age")) == 1)], "^age_")) %>% 
  ungroup() %>% 
  select(age, gender)

# # A tibble: 5 x 2
#   age   gender
#   <chr>  <int>
# 1 11-20      0
# 2 21-30      1
# 3 31-40      0
# 4 11-20      1
# 5 51-60      1
4

Try the base R code below using max.col

cbind(
  age = gsub("^age_", "", head(names(df), -1)[max.col(df[-ncol(df)])]),
  df[ncol(df)]
)

which gives

    age gender
1 11-20      0
2 21-30      1
3 31-40      0
4 11-20      1
5 51-60      1
0
1

Here is another tidyverse solution:

library(dplyr)
library(purrr)

df %>%
  mutate(age = pmap_chr(select(cur_data(), !gender), 
                        ~ names(df)[-ncol(df)][as.logical(c(...))])) %>%
  select(age, gender)

        age gender
1 age_11-20      0
2 age_21-30      1
3 age_31-40      0
4 age_11-20      1
5 age_51-60      1

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.