2
public class IdentityHashMap<K,V>
    extends AbstractMap<K,V>
    implements Map<K,V>, java.io.Serializable, Cloneable
{
    /**
     * The initial capacity used by the no-args constructor.
     * MUST be a power of two.  The value 32 corresponds to the
     * (specified) expected maximum size of 21, given a load factor
     * of 2/3.
     */
    private static final int DEFAULT_CAPACITY = 32;
    
    // omitted
}

From jdk/IdentityHashMap.java at jdk8-b120 · openjdk/jdk · GitHub

Update

I also found that ThreadLocal.ThreadLocalMap also uses 2/3 as the load factor, It also uses linear probing to resolve conflicts.

/**
 * Set the resize threshold to maintain at worst a 2/3 load factor.
 */
private void setThreshold(int len) {
    threshold = len * 2 / 3;
}

From jdk/ThreadLocal.java at jdk8-b120 · openjdk/jdk · GitHub

9
  • Maybe because it uses linear probing, which is more sensitive to high load factors.
    – shmosel
    Dec 22, 2021 at 2:28
  • 1
    It doesn't use 2/3 as a load factor. The comment in the code just explains why 32 is a good initial capacity. It needs to be a power of 2, and it needs to be a bit more than 20. Dec 22, 2021 at 2:28
  • 1
    Why do you think, 0.75 (=3/4) would be a better load factor than 2/3?
    – Holger
    Dec 22, 2021 at 12:55
  • 1
    @shmosel it always baffled me why they decided to use this load factor approach instead of just counting the actual number of collisions. In the end, both approaches use an int field but the load factor approach can cause entirely obsolete rehashing operations.
    – Holger
    Dec 22, 2021 at 12:58
  • 1
    Well, we don’t know whether the author(s) of IdentityHashMap ever considered using the same load factor as HashMap. If they did, shmosel’s conjecture is the most plausible.
    – Holger
    Dec 22, 2021 at 13:51

0

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