3

I'm trying to create a packet to send over serial using ruby-serialport. This seems like it should be simple, and it works when I just write a string:

packet = "\xFF\x03\x10\x01\x01\xFE"
sp.write(packet)
=>hardware does what it's supposed to, opens the door represented by the 4th hex value

but I obviously need to do it programmatically, and I can't figure out the right way. Here are just a few of the things I've tried:

door = 1    
packet = "\xFF\x03\x10" + door.to_s(16) + "\x01\xFE"
sp.write(packet)
=> can't convert fixnum into string

and

door = 1
packet = "\xFF\x03\x10" + door.to_a.pack('H*') + "\x01\xFE"
sp.write(packet)
=> to_a will be obsolete
can't convert fixnum into string

and

door = 1
sp.write("\xFF\x03\x10")
sp.write(door)
sp.write("\x01\xFE")
=>no response from hardware

Can anyone help me out on how to properly convert a number into the right hex notation for serialport and joining to the other hex strings? Thanks in advance!

4

You're really going to get into trouble if you insist on using strings to represent otherwise binary data. What you really need is pack:

packet = [ 0xFF, 0x30, 0x10, door, 0x01, 0xFE ].pack('C*')

This makes it very easy to construct and deconstruct arbitrary binary data. The method supports not just unsigned characters but a variety of other types that are commonly used.

You may even want to construct your own method to read and write this:

def write_packet(*bytes)
  sp.write(bytes.flatten.pack('C*'))
end
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Right, it makes a lot of sense, and that's what I'm doing on the receiving end, I guess I was just being lazy (and very inexperienced working at this low level) on the writing end because the thing I'm interfacing with has two commands that need one variable each. But might just as well do it right, thank you very much for the advice. – jack_was_taken Aug 12 '11 at 18:52
  • 1
    Keep in mind that under Ruby 1.9 using chr you may run into conflict with UTF-8 or your default character set. Ensure that your file-handles are open in BINARY mode or you may find characters getting converted on you and the data-stream will be mangled. Ruby 1.8 is living in the "Ignorance is Bliss" world of character encoding. I get an Encoding::CompatibilityError error for door values > 127 when using chr. pack is the only sane way to deal with this. – tadman Aug 12 '11 at 21:22
3

Try this:

door = 1    
packet = "\xFF\x03\x10" + door.chr + "\x01\xFE"
| improve this answer | |
  • oh, fantastic, thank you! I feel stupid for not looking more carefully at integer methods. Really appreciate it. – jack_was_taken Aug 12 '11 at 18:46
  • This won't work in Ruby 1.9 using UTF-8 encoding for values of door over 127. – tadman Aug 12 '11 at 21:26

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