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I know (-0 === 0) comes out to be true. I am curious to know why -0 < 0 happens?

When I run this code in stackoverflow execution context, it returns 0.

const arr = [+0, 0, -0];
console.log(Math.min(...arr));

But when I run the same code in the browser console, it returns -0. Why is that? I have tried to search it on google but didn't find anything useful. This question might not add value to someone practical example, I wanted to understand how does JS calculates it.

 const arr = [+0, 0, -0];
    console.log(Math.min(...arr)); // -0
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  • 4
    Interesting, can reproduce on Chrome. Also Math.min(0, -0) and Math.min(-0, 0) both return -0, so Math.min does differentiate those Commented Dec 22, 2021 at 14:14
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    "When I run this code in stackoverflow execution context, it returns 0." - and if you check the browser console at the same time, there you will see -0. Stackverflows's "own" console inside these snippets behaves a bit different, than the real one. If you log arr as well, that gives [0, 0, 0] in the SO console, and [0, 0, -0] in the native browser console.
    – CBroe
    Commented Dec 22, 2021 at 14:15
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    there are other exceptions, Object.is(-0, +0); -> false and 1/0 === Infinity -> true while 1/-0 === -Infinity -> true.
    – pilchard
    Commented Dec 22, 2021 at 14:35
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    @Pointy the answer might also be in "IEEE 754 2019, §5.10", which defines both a comparison operation and a totalOrder ... Unfortunately this specification is behind a paywall Commented Dec 22, 2021 at 14:51
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    @JonasWilms Here you go. Page 69, Section 9.6, "-0 compares less than +0". Commented Dec 23, 2021 at 11:40

4 Answers 4

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-0 is not less than 0 or +0, both -0 < 0 and -0 < +0 returns False, you're mixing the behavior of Math.min with the comparison of -0 with 0/+0.

The specification of Math.min is clear on this point:

b. If number is -0𝔽 and lowest is +0𝔽, set lowest to -0𝔽.

Without this exception, the behavior of Math.min and Math.max would depend on the order of arguments, which can be considered an odd behavior — you probably want Math.min(x, y) to always equal Math.min(y, x) — so that might be one possible justification.

Note: This exception was already present in the 1997 specification for Math.min(x, y), so that's not something that was added later on.

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    I agree, but this is somewhat odd, that Math.min() would have semantics different from those of the < operator. I would say that that definitely violates the principle of least surprise.
    – Pointy
    Commented Dec 22, 2021 at 14:18
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    it doesn't seem that odd to me, 0 is the only value whose - and + values are equal, so < is inadequate to return a consistent result.
    – pilchard
    Commented Dec 22, 2021 at 14:38
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    @pilchard That's a good point, it's probably better to ensure that Math.min(x, y) always equal Math.min(y, x) so that you do not have to bother about order of arguments.
    – Holt
    Commented Dec 22, 2021 at 14:42
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    As for why it's always been implemented like this and got specified in ES1: because Java has the same behaviour, and the Math object is basically taken from Java.
    – Bergi
    Commented Dec 22, 2021 at 22:49
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    @Pointy: If you had a min function defined only as a<b ? a : b, it also wouldn't propagate NaN reliably. That's another reason why C fmin and JS Math.min aren't defined that way. (But C++ std::min is based on <, as is x86 minps - see What is the instruction that gives branchless FP min and max on x86? for details on them being non-commutative.) Commented Dec 23, 2021 at 1:34
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This is a specialty of Math.min, as specified:

21.3.2.25 Math.min ( ...args )

[...]

  1. For each element number of coerced, do

a. If number is NaN, return NaN.

b. If number is -0𝔽 and lowest is +0𝔽, set lowest to -0𝔽.

c. If number < lowest, set lowest to number.

  1. Return lowest.

Note that in most cases, +0 and -0 are treated equally, also in the ToString conversion, thus (-0).toString() evaluates to "0". That you can observe the difference in the browser console is an implementation detail of the browser.

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    Wait, what? JS ToString is lossy and hides the sign of zero?? smh... Commented Dec 22, 2021 at 22:46
  • @R..GitHubSTOPHELPINGICE yup, though usually such a string would be shown to a human, which (most likely) is unaware of the existence of a "negative zero". The information would then be lost anyways ;) Commented Dec 23, 2021 at 10:48
  • @R..GitHubSTOPHELPINGICE How would you distinguish between -0 and 0 in code then, if the string values are equal?
    – leo848
    Commented Dec 28, 2021 at 21:54
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    @leo848 Object.is(-0, theValue) ... Most other comparisons (including ===) treat them as equal. Commented Dec 28, 2021 at 22:11
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The point of this answer is to explain why the language design choice of having Math.min be fully commutative makes sense.

I am curious to know why -0 < 0 happens?

It doesn't really; < is a separate operation from "minimum", and Math.min isn't based solely on IEEE < comparison like b<a ? b : a.

That would be non-commutative wrt. NaN as well as signed-zero. (< is false if either operand is NaN, so that would produce a).
As far as principle of least surprise, it would be at least as surprising (if not moreso) if Math.min(-1,NaN) was NaN but Math.min(NaN, -1) was -1.

The JS language designers wanted Math.min to be NaN-propagating, so basing it just on < wasn't possible anyway. They chose to make it fully commutative including for signed zero, which seems like a sensible decision.

OTOH, most code doesn't care about signed zero, so this language design choice costs a bit of performance for everyone to cater to the rare cases where someone wants well-defined signed-zero semantics.

If you want a simple operation that ignores NaN in an array, iterate yourself with current_min = x < current_min ? x : current_min. That will ignore all NaN, and also ignore -0 for current_min <= +0.0 (IEEE comparison). Or if current_min starts out NaN, it will stay NaN. Many of those things are undesirable for a Math.min function, so it doesn't work that way.


If you compare other languages, the C standard fmin function is commutative wrt. NaN (returning the non-NaN if there is one, opposite of JS), but is not required to be commutative wrt. signed zero. Some C implementations choose to work like JS for +-0.0 for fmin / fmax.

But C++ std::min is defined purely in terms of a < operation, so it does work that way. (It's intended to work generically, including on non-numeric types like strings; unlike std::fmin it doesn't have any FP-specific rules.) See What is the instruction that gives branchless FP min and max on x86? re: x86's minps instruction and C++ std::min which are both non-commutative wrt. NaN and signed zero.


IEEE 754 < doesn't give you a total order over distinct FP numbers. Math.min does except for NaNs (e.g. if you built a sorting network with it and Math.max.) Its order disagrees with Math.max: they both return NaN if there is one, so a sorting network using min/max comparators would produce all NaNs if there were any in the input array.

Math.min alone wouldn't be sufficient for sorting without something like == to see which arg it returned, but that breaks down for signed zero as well as NaN.

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  • You can use Object.is instead of == to compare with signed zero and NaN.
    – Bergi
    Commented Dec 23, 2021 at 7:59
  • @Bergi: thanks. I assume Object.is considers two NaNs with different payloads not-equal, like C memcmp would? (i.e. different mantissas, and/or different sign bits; IEEE 754 spends 2^53-1 encodings each on +-NaN for double, instead of doing gradual overflow or anything like that, only gradual underflow.) Commented Dec 23, 2021 at 8:03
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    No, in JS there is only a single NaN value without a payload, or as the spec puts it: "to ECMAScript code, all NaN values are indistinguishable from each other."
    – Bergi
    Commented Dec 23, 2021 at 8:08
  • ... as in general there is no memory in ECMAScript ... The specification lives in a world far away from computers and circuits ... Commented Dec 23, 2021 at 11:06
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    @PeterCordes my point was that reading the specification is easier and more intuitive when not thinking about actual memory represetations or runtime implementations. In fact there is also no mantissa (well, there is m, to describe how numbers are normalized) and how numbers are stored is totally implementation specific. Commented Dec 23, 2021 at 13:56
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The spec is curiously contradictory. The < comparison rule explicitly says that -0 is not less than +0. However, the spec for Math.min() says the opposite: if the current (while iterating through the arguments) value is -0, and the smallest value so far is +0, then the smallest value should be set to -0.

I would like for somebody to activate the T.J. Crowder signal for this one.

edit — it was suggested in some comments that a possible reason for the behavior is to make it possible to detect a -0 value, even though for almost all purposes in normal expressions the -0 is treated as being plain 0.

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    While pedantic in the extreme, I would argue that it is not contradictory. If a = Math.min(a, b), it is not true in general that a < b. It is true that a <= b. Furthermore it is perhaps desirable that Math.min(a,b) = Math.min(b,a). In that case, Math.min() must choose an ordering for distinct objects a, b for which a == b. This ordering need not implicate the less than operator. Commented Dec 22, 2021 at 14:37
  • @PresidentJamesK.Polk yes Mr President I just added a note to the answer. The ability to find a -0 is probably valuable in some cases, and the semantics of the relational operators makes that difficult if these other mechanisms didn't provide that ability. (Of course, checking that Math.min() has returned -0 is itself a conundrum, but clearly it can be done at least.)
    – Pointy
    Commented Dec 22, 2021 at 14:40
  • (copying my comment here for future readers) if you had a min function defined only as a<b ? a : b, it also wouldn't propagate NaN reliably. That's another reason why C fmin and JS Math.min aren't defined that way. (But see also What is the instruction that gives branchless FP min and max on x86? re: x86 minps and C++ std::min which are just based on a single < operation, so they're non-commutative wrt. NaN and signed zero.) IEEE 754 < doesn't give you a total order over all FP numbers with distinct bit-patterns. Neither does Math.min. Commented Dec 23, 2021 at 3:02
  • If you want a simple operation that works the way you describe, only updating your current_min if a < comparison is true, use current_min = x < current_min ? x : current_min. That will ignore all NaN, and also ignore -0 for current_min >= 0. And if current_min starts out NaN, it will stay NaN. Many of those things are undesirable for a Math.min function, so it doesn't work that way. Being commutative wrt. +-0 seems like a sensible decision, especially since we already want it to be NaN propagating and thus not equivalent to a<b ? a : b Commented Dec 23, 2021 at 3:06
  • (Correction to my earlier; C fmin and fmax avoid progating NaN, always returning the non-NaN if there is one.) Commented Dec 23, 2021 at 3:19

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