6

I have this table that contains variables that are one hot encoded. I want to collapse these variables into one column. For example, any columns that have "high", "med", or "low", I want to be one column with numerical encodings for high = 0, med = 1, and low = 2. How can I do this in dplyr R? I suspect pivoting will help but I'm not sure where to start. The resulting column name should contain the name of the three columns without the high,med,low designation. For example, I would transform columns d-high_cm1, d-med_cm1, d-low_cm1 to d-cm1 with the numerical encodings.

input:

sex age    cost_cm  d-high_cm1 d-med_cm1 d-low_cm1 c-high_cm1 c-med_cm1 c-low_cm1
f   old    1        1           0         0           1           0         0
m   young  0        1           0         0           1           0         0
m   old    0        0           1         0           0           1         0
f   young  0        1           0         0           0           0         1
m   old    1        0           0         1           0           0         1

expected output:

sex age    cost_cm  d-cm1 c-cm1 
f   old    1        0     0
m   young  0        0     0
m   old    0        1     1
f   young  0        0     2
m   old    1        2     2

2
  • tidyr::pivot_longer might be the place to look. Or, if you want to do it manually, mutate(dcm1 = 2*d-high_cm1 + d-med_cm1) etc. would work. Backticking your column names where appropriate, obvs
    – dash2
    Commented Dec 22, 2021 at 18:56
  • How can I do a pivot_longer for only columns that contain med, low, and high and pivot those 3 matching columns based on the column names?
    – Eisen
    Commented Dec 22, 2021 at 18:57

3 Answers 3

2

Here's an alternative,

library(dplyr)
library(tidyr) # pivot_*, unite
dat %>%
  pivot_longer(
    -c(sex, age, cost_cm),
    names_pattern = "([^.]+)-([a-z]+)_(.*)",
    names_to = c("ltr", "fctr", "key")
  ) %>%
  left_join(fctrs, by = "fctr") %>%
  mutate(value = value * fctrval) %>%
  unite("key", ltr, key) %>% 
  group_by(sex, age, cost_cm, key) %>%
  summarize(value = max(value)) %>%
  ungroup() %>%
  pivot_wider(c(sex, age, cost_cm), names_from = "key", values_from = "value")
# # A tibble: 5 x 5
#   sex   age   cost_cm c_cm1 d_cm1
#   <chr> <chr>   <int> <dbl> <dbl>
# 1 f     old         1     0     0
# 2 f     young       0     2     0
# 3 m     old         0     1     1
# 4 m     old         1     2     2
# 5 m     young       0     0     0
2

We may do

library(stringr)
library(dplyr)
library(tidyr)
df1 %>% 
   mutate(across(contains("-"), ~ case_when(str_detect(cur_column(),
      'low') ~ . * 2, str_detect(cur_column(), 'med')  ~ . * 1,
        TRUE ~ .* 0))) %>%
   rename_with(~ str_replace(., "-(\\w+)_(\\w+)", "-\\2_\\1"), contains('-')) %>% 
   pivot_longer(cols = contains('-'), names_to = c(".value"), 
      names_pattern = "^([^_]+)_.*")%>% 
   group_by(sex, age, cost_cm) %>% 
   summarise(across(everything(), max), .groups = 'drop')

-output

# A tibble: 5 × 5
  sex   age   cost_cm `d-cm1` `c-cm1`
  <chr> <chr>   <int>   <dbl>   <dbl>
1 f     old         1       0       0
2 f     young       0       0       2
3 m     old         0       1       1
4 m     old         1       2       2
5 m     young       0       0       0

Or using base R

lst1 <- lapply(split.default(df1[-c(1:3)], sub("-[^_]+", "", 
    names(df1)[-(1:3)])), function(x) do.call(pmax, x *  (0:2)[col(x)]))
cbind(df1[1:3], lst1)

-output

   sex   age cost_cm c_cm1 d_cm1
1   f   old       1     0     0
2   m young       0     0     0
3   m   old       0     1     1
4   f young       0     2     0
5   m   old       1     2     2

data

df1 <- structure(list(sex = c("f", "m", "m", "f", "m"), age = c("old", 
"young", "old", "young", "old"), cost_cm = c(1L, 0L, 0L, 0L, 
1L), `d-high_cm1` = c(1L, 1L, 0L, 1L, 0L), `d-med_cm1` = c(0L, 
0L, 1L, 0L, 0L), `d-low_cm1` = c(0L, 0L, 0L, 0L, 1L), `c-high_cm1` = c(1L, 
1L, 0L, 0L, 0L), `c-med_cm1` = c(0L, 0L, 1L, 0L, 0L), `c-low_cm1` = c(0L, 
0L, 0L, 1L, 1L)), class = "data.frame", row.names = c(NA, -5L
))
9
  • Can this be done without the regex? I'm not sure I completely understanding what the regex is doing. This looks like a great solution however
    – Eisen
    Commented Dec 22, 2021 at 18:58
  • @Eisen does your expected output have more rows?
    – akrun
    Commented Dec 22, 2021 at 19:02
  • No it has the same amount of rows. The columns are just updated based on if it contains high,med,low in the column name - resulting in columns d-cm1 and c-cm1
    – Eisen
    Commented Dec 22, 2021 at 19:04
  • @Eisen Your description says to change 'med' to 1, low to 3 etc. where is the 3 case in the expected
    – akrun
    Commented Dec 22, 2021 at 19:06
  • Sorry the "3" was a typo, i meant to write 2. If you look at the resulting output (5th row) d-cm1 is labeled as 2 because it was labeled "low" in the input (because d-low_cm1 = 1) Does that make sense?
    – Eisen
    Commented Dec 22, 2021 at 19:08
1

Another possible solution:

library(tidyverse)

df %>% 
  mutate(across(contains("high"), ~ 0),
         across(contains("low"), ~ ifelse(.x == 1,2,0))) %>% 
  mutate(`d-cm1` = rowSums(.[,4:6]), `c-cm1` = rowSums(.[,7:9])) %>% 
  select(-(4:9))

#>   sex   age cost_cm d-cm1 c-cm1
#> 1   f   old       1     0     0
#> 2   m young       0     0     0
#> 3   m   old       0     1     1
#> 4   f young       0     0     2
#> 5   m   old       1     2     2

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.