5

(Solution has been found, please avoid reading on.)

I am creating a pixel art editor for Android, and as for all pixel art editors, a paint bucket (fill tool) is a must need.

To do this, I did some research on flood fill algorithms online.

I stumbled across the following video which explained how to implement an iterative flood fill algorithm in your code. The code used in the video was JavaScript, but I was easily able to convert the code from the video to Kotlin:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Bochyn8MMI&t=72s&ab_channel=crayoncode

Here is an excerpt of the JavaScript code from the video:

enter image description here

Converted code:

Tools.FILL_TOOL -> {
            val seedColor = instance.rectangles[rectTapped]?.color ?: Color.WHITE

            val queue = LinkedList<XYPosition>()

            queue.offer(MathExtensions.convertIndexToXYPosition(rectangleData.indexOf(rectTapped), instance.spanCount.toInt()))

            val selectedColor = getSelectedColor()

            while (queue.isNotEmpty() && seedColor != selectedColor) { // While the queue is not empty the code below will run
                val current = queue.poll()
                val color = instance.rectangles.toList()[convertXYDataToIndex(instance, current)].second?.color ?: Color.WHITE

                if (color != seedColor) {
                    continue
                }

                instance.extraCanvas.apply {
                    instance.rectangles[rectangleData[convertXYDataToIndex(instance, current)]] = defaultRectPaint // Colors in pixel with defaultRectPaint
                    drawRect(rectangleData[convertXYDataToIndex(instance, current)], defaultRectPaint)

                    for (index in expandToNeighborsWithMap(instance, current)) {
                        val candidate = MathExtensions.convertIndexToXYPosition(index, instance.spanCount.toInt())
                        queue.offer(candidate)
                    }
                }
            }
        }

Now, I want to address two major issues I'm having with the code of mine:

  • Performance

  • Flooding glitch (fixed by suggestion from person in the comments)


Performance

A flood fill needs to be very fast and shouldn't take less than a second, the problem is, say I have a canvas of size 50 x 50, and I decide to fill in the whole canvas, it can take up to 8 seconds or more.

Here is some data I've compiled for the time it's taken to fill in a whole canvas given the spanCount value:

spanCount approx time taken in seconds to fill whole canvas
10 <1 seconds
20 ~2 seconds
40 ~6 seconds
60 ~15 seconds
100 ~115 seconds

The conclusion from the data is that the flood fill algorithm is unusually slow.

To find out why, I decided to test out which parts of the code are taking the most time to compile. I came to the conclusion that the expandToNeighbors function is taking the most time out of all the other tasks:

enter image description here

Here is an excerpt of the expandToNeighbors function:

fun expandToNeighbors(instance: MyCanvasView, from: XYPosition): List<Int> {
    var asIndex1 = from.x
    var asIndex2 = from.x

    var asIndex3 = from.y
    var asIndex4 = from.y

    if (from.x > 1) {
        asIndex1 = xyPositionData!!.indexOf(XYPosition(from.x - 1, from.y))
    }

    if (from.x < instance.spanCount) {
        asIndex2 = xyPositionData!!.indexOf(XYPosition(from.x + 1, from.y))
    }

    if (from.y > 1) {
        asIndex3 = xyPositionData!!.indexOf(XYPosition(from.x, from.y - 1))
    }

    if (from.y < instance.spanCount) {
        asIndex4 = xyPositionData!!.indexOf(XYPosition(from.x, from.y + 1))
    }

    return listOf(asIndex1, asIndex2, asIndex3, asIndex4)
} 

To understand the use of the expandToNeighbors function, I would recommend watching the video that I linked above.

(The if statements are there to make sure you won't get an IndexOutOfBoundsException if you try and expand from the edge of the canvas.)

This function will return the index of the north, south, west, and east pixels from the xyPositionData list which contains XYPosition objects.

(The black pixel is the from parameter.)

enter image description here

The xyPositionData list is initialized once in the convertXYDataToIndex function, here:

var xyPositionData: List<XYPosition>? = null
var rectangleData: List<RectF>? = null

fun convertXYDataToIndex(instance: MyCanvasView, from: XYPosition): Int {

    if (rectangleData == null) {
        rectangleData = instance.rectangles.keys.toList()
    }

    if (xyPositionData == null) {
        xyPositionData = MathExtensions.convertListOfSizeNToListOfXYPosition(
            rectangleData!!.size,
            instance.spanCount.toInt()
        )
    }

    return xyPositionData!!.indexOf(from)
}

So, the code works fine (kind of) but the expandToNeighbors function is very slow, and it is the main reason why the flood fill algorithm is taking a long time.

My colleague suggested that indexOf may be slowing everything down, and that I should probably switch to a Map-based implementation with a key being XYPosition and a value being Int representing the index, so I replaced it with the following:

fun expandToNeighborsWithMap(instance: MyCanvasView, from: XYPosition): List<Int> {
    var asIndex1 = from.x
    var asIndex2 = from.x

    var asIndex3 = from.y
    var asIndex4 = from.y

    if (from.x > 1) {
        asIndex1 = rectangleDataMap!![XYPosition(from.x - 1, from.y)]!!
    }

    if (from.x < instance.spanCount) {
        asIndex2 =  rectangleDataMap!![XYPosition(from.x + 1, from.y)]!!
    }

    if (from.y > 1) {
        asIndex3 =  rectangleDataMap!![XYPosition(from.x, from.y - 1)]!!
    }

    if (from.y < instance.spanCount) {
        asIndex4 = rectangleDataMap!![XYPosition(from.x, from.y + 1)]!!
    }

    return listOf(asIndex1, asIndex2, asIndex3, asIndex4)
}

It functions the same way, only this time it uses a Map which is initialized here:

var xyPositionData: List<XYPosition>? = null
var rectangleData: List<RectF>? = null
var rectangleDataMap: Map<XYPosition, Int>? = null

fun convertXYDataToIndex(instance: MyCanvasView, from: XYPosition): Int {

    if (rectangleData == null) {
        rectangleData = instance.rectangles.keys.toList()
    }

    if (xyPositionData == null) {
        xyPositionData = MathExtensions.convertListOfSizeNToListOfXYPosition(
            rectangleData!!.size,
            instance.spanCount.toInt()
        )
    }

    if (rectangleDataMap == null) {
        rectangleDataMap = MathExtensions.convertListToMap(
            rectangleData!!.size,
            instance.spanCount.toInt()
        )
    }

    return xyPositionData!!.indexOf(from)
}

Converting the code to use a map increased the speed by around 20%, although the algorithm is still slow.

After spending a couple of days trying to make the algorithm work faster, I'm out of ideas and I'm unsure why the expandToNeighbors function is taking a long time. Any help would be appreciated to fix this issue.

Apologies if I didn't do a good enough job of explaining the exact issue, but I have tried my best. Implementation-wise it is quite messy unfortunately because of the whole list index to XYPosition conversions, but at least it works - the only problem is the performance.


So I have two one major problem, if anyone can try and find a solution for it, it would be great because I have tried to myself without much luck.

I've actually pushed the fill tool to GitHub as a KIOL (Known Issue or Limitation), so the user can use the fill tool if they want, but they need to be aware of the limitations/issues. This is so anyone who wants to help me fix this can have a look at my code and reproduce the bugs.

Link to repository:

https://github.com/realtomjoney/PyxlMoose


Edit after bounty

I understand that this question is extremely difficult to answer and will require a lot of thinking. I've tried myself to fix these issues but haven't had much success, so I'm offering 50 reputation for anyone who can assist.

I would recommend you clone PyxlMoose and reproduce the errors, then work from there. Relying on the code snippets isn't enough.


Formula for converting XY position to an index

Somebody in the comments suggested a formula for converting an XYPosition to an index value, I came up with the following method which works:

    fun convertXYPositionToIndex(xyPosition: XYPosition, spanCount: Int): Int {
        val positionX = xyPosition.x
        val positionY = xyPosition.y

        return (spanCount - positionY) + (spanCount * (positionX - 1))
    }

The only problem is - it increases the speed by around 50% but it's still taking around 10-15 seconds to fill in an area of 80 by 80 pixels, so it has helped to a large degree although it's still very slow. But thank you very much for the suggestion anyways, it has helped a lot :)

13
  • Your expandToNeighbors always returns 4 points, even on the corner of canvas. In this way all the corners could generate same points multiple times. I think it can impact, but I'm not sure if it's crucial.
    – Ircover
    Dec 29, 2021 at 7:43
  • @Ircover Thank you for this, I'm surprised doing that had an impact actually. I could accept that as an answer for the 2nd question I had and can give you 50 reputation, although I'm still kind of searching for an answer to my main problem as I still have the performance issue. But at least there isn't that flooding issue anymore. Dec 29, 2021 at 8:08
  • 1
    I haven't looked through all your code, but it looks like it should be easy to come up with a conversion from XYPositions to indices (the inverse of your convertIndexToXYPosition function). That should help get rid of the indexOf calls and the map lookups entirely, which will definitely help performance.
    – EvilTak
    Dec 29, 2021 at 8:20
  • any chance you can create a unittest in which the problem is easily reproducable? Dec 29, 2021 at 13:49
  • 1
    A unittest would make it easier to isolate the problem. Now I have to install the app, figure out how the app works and figure out what to do to invoke the method we are taking about. Dec 29, 2021 at 15:05

2 Answers 2

0
+50

I think the performance issue is because of expandToNeighbors method generates 4 points all the time. It becomes crucial on the border, where you'd better generate 3 (or even 2 on corner) points, so extra point is current position again. So first border point doubles following points count, second one doubles it again (now it's x4) and so on.

If I'm right, you saw not the slow method work, but it was called too often.

1
  • Thanks :) I think you deserve the bounty for fixing that annoying issue! Dec 30, 2021 at 1:21
0

How I fixed it:

  • Getting rid of the toList() calls.
  • Creating an convertXYPositionToIndex() function.

Here is my new code:

   Tools.FILL_TOOL -> {
            val seedColor = instance.rectangles[rectTapped]?.color ?: Color.WHITE

            val queue = LinkedList<XYPosition>()

            val spanCount = instance.spanCount.toInt()

            queue.offer(MathExtensions.convertIndexToXYPosition(rectangleData.indexOf(rectTapped), spanCount))

            val selectedColor = getSelectedColor()

            while (queue.isNotEmpty() && seedColor != selectedColor) {

                val current = queue.poll()

                val color = instance.rectangles[rectangleData[convertXYDataToIndex(spanCount, current)]]?.color ?: Color.WHITE

                if (color != seedColor) {
                    continue
                }

                instance.rectangles[rectangleData[convertXYDataToIndex(spanCount, current)]] = defaultRectPaint // Colors in pixel with defaultRectPaint
                instance.extraCanvas.drawRect(rectangleData[MathExtensions.convertXYPositionToIndex(current, spanCount)], defaultRectPaint)

                for (index in expandToNeighborsWithMap(spanCount, current)) {
                    val candidate = MathExtensions.convertIndexToXYPosition(index, spanCount)
                    queue.offer(candidate)
                }
            }
            val timeTakenForThis = (System.currentTimeMillis()-startTime)
            totalTime += timeTakenForThis
        }

Expand to neighbors func:

fun expandToNeighborsWithMap(spanCount: Int, from: XYPosition): List<Int> {
    val toReturn = mutableListOf<Int>()

    if (from.x > 1) {
        toReturn.add(MathExtensions.convertXYPositionToIndex(XYPosition(from.x - 1, from.y), spanCount))
    }

    if (from.x < spanCount) {
        toReturn.add(MathExtensions.convertXYPositionToIndex(XYPosition(from.x + 1, from.y), spanCount))
    }

    if (from.y > 1) {
        toReturn.add(MathExtensions.convertXYPositionToIndex(XYPosition(from.x, from.y - 1), spanCount))
    }

    if (from.y < spanCount) {
        toReturn.add(MathExtensions.convertXYPositionToIndex(XYPosition(from.x, from.y + 1), spanCount))
    }

    return toReturn
}

It takes less than a second for canvas sizes of 100 by 100 and 200 by 200, so I'd say it's in the usable stage now.

I would say this is one of the simplest Android flood fill algorithms out there to understand, so if anyone is making an app similar to mine and they want a flood fill tool they can copy my code.

A guy in the comments called EvilTalk helped me with this.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.