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In both statements, I am appending a character "a" to the string s:

  1. s += "a"
  2. s = s + "a"

Which statement has the better time complexity in Python?

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2 Answers 2

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They have the same time complexity.

In the general Python standard defined case: They both have the same time complexity of O(n), where n is the length of string s.

In practice, with the CPython implementation: They can in some cases both be O(1), because of an optimization that the interpreter does.

Demo (using Python 3.10.1):

O(1) (optimization in play):

String of length 10⁹, using +=:

$ python -m timeit --setup='s = "s" * 10**9' 's += "a"'
5000000 loops, best of 5: 96.6 nsec per loop

String of length 10⁹, using +:

$ python -m timeit --setup='s = "s" * 10**9' 's = s + "a"'
5000000 loops, best of 5: 95.5 nsec per loop

String of length 1, using +=:

$ python -m timeit --setup='s = "s"' 's += "a"'
5000000 loops, best of 5: 97 nsec per loop

String of length 1, using +:

$ python -m timeit --setup='s = "s"' 's = s + "a"'
5000000 loops, best of 5: 97.9 nsec per loop

O(n) (optimization doesn't apply):

String of length 10⁹, optimization doesn't apply, using +=:

$ python -m timeit --setup='s = "s" * 10**9; b = s' 's += "a"'
1 loop, best of 5: 440 msec per loop

String of length 10⁹, optimization doesn't apply, using +:

$ python -m timeit --setup='s = "s" * 10**9; b = s' 's = s + "a"'
1 loop, best of 5: 445 msec per loop

String of length 1, optimization doesn't apply, using +=:

$ python -m timeit --setup='s = "s"; b = s' 's += "a"'
5000000 loops, best of 5: 85.8 nsec per loop

String of length 1, optimization doesn't apply, using +:

$ python -m timeit --setup='s = "s"; b = s' 's = s + "a"'
5000000 loops, best of 5: 84.8 nsec per loop

More info about the time complexity of string concatenation: https://stackoverflow.com/a/37133870/9835872 https://stackoverflow.com/a/34008199/9835872

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  • 1
    A note: The optimization in CPython isn't actually in str.__add__ or str.__iadd__ (the latter doesn't even exist; __add__ is seamlessly used when += is used and __iadd__ doesn't exist). The optimization is baked into the interpreter's bytecode evaluation loop which checks for update-in-place cases, performs some evil reference manipulation if so, then devolves to PyUnicode_Append, which recognizes when it can modify in place (only because the interpreter cleared the target reference first). The actual str.__add__ doesn't use PyUnicode_Append, and can't use the optimization. Dec 27, 2021 at 20:39
  • Thanks @ShadowRanger, fixed my answer a bit! Really interesting stuff 👍
    – ruohola
    Dec 27, 2021 at 20:41
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    You're welcome! Note: Even that explanation will change in the future; it's accurate as of 3.10, but it looks like 3.11 will do some crazy stuff with runtime adaptive bytecodes and the like (BINARY_ADD goes away, in favor of BINARY_OP_ADD_INT, BINARY_OP_ADD_FLOAT and BINARY_OP_ADD_UNICODE, which can all devolve to a plain BINARY_OP pathway when exact types don't match), and it looks like, at least at time of writing, they completely removed hack to operate in place (even for BINARY_OP_ADD_UNICODE), so this code may get much slower in 3.11 unless they add the hack back in. Dec 27, 2021 at 20:46
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    Looks like the optimization still exists, I just missed the addition of BINARY_OP_INPLACE_ADD_UNICODE, which uses the same hackery as the older code path, so the performance should remain the same (or be slightly better by only even trying it when the code path is one that can actually trigger the optimization). The optimization does look like it might be disabled for the s = s + "a" case though (unless the bytecode compiler actually recognizes that pattern and replaces it with s += "a", but that seems stupid dangerous since it would change behavior for non-strings). Dec 27, 2021 at 20:59
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Strings in Python are immutable, so whenever you "append" to s, Python makes a copy of s and appends the new character, effectively taking O(n) time complexity for both.

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