28

Is there a function that could replace atoi in c++. I made some research and didn't find anything to replace it, the only solutions would be using cstdlib or implementing it myself

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    Why would you need to replace it? – Jesus Ramos Aug 13 '11 at 13:32
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    @Jesus: atoi is not safe! It doesn't handle invalid input. Also, he can use a lot more other utilities from boost. – Nawaz Aug 13 '11 at 13:46
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    The C++ standard library explicitly contains the C standard library, so <cstdlib> is an entirely legitimate part of C++. Say std::atoi if that makes you feel better :-) – Kerrek SB Aug 13 '11 at 13:48
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    @Jesus: That is what I'm saying atoi doesn't handle invalid input. – Nawaz Aug 13 '11 at 13:52
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    I agree with @Nawaz in that atoi has a very poor interface. strtol is suitable replacement, not because it does anything different - it doesn't, but because it has an interface that allows you to check whether a successful conversion happened. I don't really understand @JesusRamos argument that you should write more code to check your input before passing it to a conversion function. Isn't writing a function that determines whether a string can be parsed into a number just as hard as writing a function that does that conversion? In which case, why not use a library function that does both. – CB Bailey Aug 13 '11 at 14:59
19

If you don't want to use Boost, C++11 added std::stoi for strings. Similar methods exist for all types.

std::string s = "123"
int num = std::stoi(s);

Unlike atoi, if no conversion can be made, an invalid_argument exception is thrown. Also, if the value is out of range for an int, an out_of_range exception is thrown.

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  • I keep expecting there to be to_int and to_long methods on std::string, or something, but I guess this is almost as good. – Steve Summit Dec 21 '15 at 23:32
10

boost::lexical_cast is your friend

#include <string>
#include <boost/lexical_cast.hpp>

int main()
{
    std::string s = "123";
    try
    {
       int i = boost::lexical_cast<int>(s); //i == 123
    }
    catch(const boost::bad_lexical_cast&)
    {
        //incorrect format   
    }
}
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  • 2
    Armen: boost::lexical_cast may throw, so surround it with try-catch to make it more complete. – Nawaz Aug 13 '11 at 13:37
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    @Nawaz: I have given a reference to the documentation. In this case the try-catch is not needed. But OK, I will add it. – Armen Tsirunyan Aug 13 '11 at 13:40
5

You can use the Boost function boost::lexical_cast<> as follows:

char* numericString = "911";
int num = boost::lexical_cast<int>( numericString );

More information can be found here (latest Boost version 1.47). Remember to handle exceptions appropriately.

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4

Without boost:
stringstream ss(my_string_with_a_number); int my_res; ss >> my_res;
About as annoying as the boost version but without the added dependency. Could possibly waste more ram.

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  • 2
    The boost version is not annoying – Armen Tsirunyan Aug 13 '11 at 13:57
  • That depends on if you like the direction C++ is taking or not :) But let's not pollute this question. – Torp Aug 13 '11 at 14:00
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    @Torp: try converting std::string s="8978x9". Your approach will fail without notifying you. On the other hand, boost::lexical_cast will throw exception and you will know it! And boost is not annoying as @Armen already said. – Nawaz Aug 13 '11 at 14:04
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    To address @Nawaz's concern of possible failure with this method, you can test the stringstream after attempting to extract something else: char x; if (!(ss >> x)) /*success*/ – kapace Feb 13 '13 at 5:12
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    @kapace: That is very subtle. I liked that. Thanks :-) – Nawaz Mar 3 '13 at 3:03
3

You don't say why atoi is unsuitable so I am going to guess it has something to do with performance. Anyway, clarification would be helpful.

Using Boost Spirit.Qi is about an order of magnitude faster than atoi, at least in tests done by Alex Ott.

I don't have a reference but the last time I tested it, Boost lexical_cast was about an order of magnitude slower than atoi. I think the reason is that it constructs a stringstream, which is quite expensive.

Update: Some more recent tests

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  • 4
    Presumably atoi is unsuitable because of its behavior given an invalid argument (I believe the behavior is undefined). – Keith Thompson Aug 26 '13 at 23:15
1

You can use the function stoi();

#include <string> 
// Need to include the <string> library to use stoi

int main(){

   std::string s = "10";
   int n = stoi(s);

}

To actually compile this you will have to enable c++11, look up on google how to do it (on code::blocks it's: Settings -> Compiler -> "Have g++ follow C++11 ISO C++ language standard") If you compile from terminal you have to add -std=c++11

g++ -std=c++11 -o program program.cpp
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