4

In answer to my previous question I learned that C++ 20 concepts do not allow overloading on struct template arguments, for example this does not work:

#include <concepts>

template <std::integral>
struct S{

};
template <std::floating_point>
struct S{
};

For curious clang error is something like, but that does not matter since I know C++ standard does not allow this code to work:

type constraint differs in template redeclaration

I find this nonworking way of writing templates very natural so I wonder was this ever considered, and if so why it was rejected during standardization?

P.S. this seems to work in C++20, but I find it much uglier

#include <concepts>
#include <iostream>

template <typename T>
requires std::integral<T> || std::floating_point<T>
struct S{

};
template <std::integral T>
struct S<T>{
    static constexpr char msg[] = "i";

};
template <std::floating_point T>
struct S<T>{
    static constexpr char msg[] = "fp";
};

int main() {
    std::cout <<  S<char>::msg << std::endl;
    std::cout <<  S<double>::msg << std::endl;
}
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  • 8
    The "ugly" bit is unnecessary. The primary can be no more than template <typename T> struct S; godbolt.org/z/zq534r66e Jan 2, 2022 at 9:58
  • @StoryTeller-UnslanderMonica but then error messages are garbage, right, since somebody deep in the code might want to use ::msg, and that is what all "good" templates have? Jan 2, 2022 at 10:06
  • 4
    I'd argue this is purely subjective. I don't think either of them will obviate the need to open the template definitions, and so the specializations and constraints will be read and understood either way. Jan 2, 2022 at 10:19
  • 4
    We were all told concepts improve error messages. But it is a false messiah, I'm afraid. Deeply nested SFINAE failures are still deeply nested and incomprehensible, whether they are checked by the old hacks or a concept. Jan 2, 2022 at 10:23
  • 2
    The first code lives in an open world where S<void*> specialisation can be legitimately added. The error message tells you that such specialisation is not visible from where you are trying to use it. The compiler cannot reasonably tell you why it is not visible. The second code lives in a closed world where S<void*> cannot possibly exist due to constraints, and the error message tells you which constraint. These are two different worlds, and you get an error message according to the world you choose. Jan 2, 2022 at 12:54

2 Answers 2

10
+100

C++ has never had overloading for classes or class templates. Classes of course have no parameters with which an overload might be chosen, but neither can one write

template<class> struct A {};
template<int> struct A {};

even though for every template-id it is obvious which would pertain (A<int> vs. A<1>). There are several reasons for this restriction:

  1. It’s impossible to write generic code that uses one of the above overloads chosen at instantiation time: for every A<…>, whether the argument is a type or a value is fixed even if it’s dependent. (This wouldn’t be true if the overloads were template<int&> and template<float&>, of course.)
  2. Templates are occasionally mentioned without any template arguments, and there’s no syntax for selecting one where both might apply. One such context is as a template template argument (that might be of the generic template<class...> class variety); another is CTAD.
  3. Some ADL-like mechanisms would be necessary to support the case of overloading a class template for an application type after generic code that used the template(s).
  4. It would not in general be possible to determine to which overload a partial specialization pertained.

The C++20 behavior is just the continuation of this model; it’s not hard to add a generic

template<class> struct S;  // undefined

to serve as an umbrella over partial specializations declared as

template<std::integral I>
struct S<I> {};
template<std::floating_point F>
struct S<F> {};
2
  • quick Q: are you sure this is correct, it looks like you are mixing NTTP and "normal" templates: template<auto> struct S; // undefined Jan 7, 2022 at 14:53
  • @NoSenseEtAl: Sorry: I wrote it right at first and then got confused by the concept syntax. Jan 7, 2022 at 15:28
6

Template argument deduction does not work with an explicit specialization of a class template (in comparison to a function template). This has nothing to do with concepts per se. You will need the template<> keyword and the <T> parameter.

I do not know of and cannot find any standard proposal further shortening this.

In the following code especially the primary definition of S got much shorter than the working version in the question.

#include <concepts>

template <typename T>
concept Number = std::integral<T> || std::floating_point<T>;


template <Number T>
struct S;

template <std::integral T>
struct S<T>{
};

template <std::floating_point T>
struct S<T>{
};

The above code compiles and works.

By using Number the first line of the error message for instantiating S with e.g. std::string is:

error: template constraint failure for 'template<class T> requires Number<T> struct S'

Which is easy to understand and to the point (with more detailing information in the following lines about std::string not being an integral || floating_point). So it is possible to build levels of error messages for wrong instantiations (e.g. you could define your own integral concept which lists the allowed integer types).

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  • 1
    I think Number is not a good name. In the std lib we have is_arithmetic which does exactly the same, so the proper name would be "arithmetic". IMHO this should actually already have been a part of the concepts library. And the concept should be template < class T > concept arithmetic = std::is_arithmetic_v<T>;.
    – JHBonarius
    Jan 6, 2022 at 10:02
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    @JHBonarius because of the ordering rules, you want concepts built from other concepts, not traits, as much as possible.
    – Caleth
    Jan 6, 2022 at 10:05
  • @Caleth ok, I'm just saying that we already have a trait is_arithmetic. So we should have a concept arithmetic. If it was standardized, we wouldn't have discussions on how it should be implemented, as that std lib already does that for us. Also, when using traits, if you wrote your own artihmetic type, you could then only write your own overload for std::is_arithmetic<MyType>. But that's off topic.
    – JHBonarius
    Jan 6, 2022 at 10:25
  • In this limited example you could choose Arithmetic as name in relation to is_arithmetic. But on the other hand, concepts are not so much about the std lib internals as about the semantics of your program. They among other advantages lead to good error messages. An identifier should be chosen that it is understandable by the users of your concept - yourself, your coworkers or the users of your library. (The same as is the case for function and type names). Even if there are existing identical concepts, it could make sense to introduce a new one with a telling name.
    – Sebastian
    Jan 7, 2022 at 16:03

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