0

It is similar to LeetCode C++ Convert char[] to string, throws AddressSanitizer: stack-buffer-overflow error

The code is

#include <string>

int main() {
    char buf[10] = {6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6};
    std::string s{buf, 2, 3};
    return 0;
}

Execution ends up with address sanitizer complaining about strlen's stack-buffer-overflow:

$ clang++ -g -fsanitize=address foo.cpp ; ./a.out
=================================================================
==1001715==ERROR: AddressSanitizer: stack-buffer-overflow on address 0x7ffd76b2510a at pc 0x00000042f029 bp 0x7ffd76b250b0 sp 0x7ffd76b24870
READ of size 23 at 0x7ffd76b2510a thread T0
    #0 0x42f028 in strlen (/tmp/a.out+0x42f028)
    #1 0x7fd6de786e9b in std::__cxx11::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >::basic_string(char const*, std::allocator<char> const&) (/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libstdc++.so.6+0x145e9b)
    #2 0x4c6cfe in main /tmp/foo.cpp:6:19
    #3 0x7fd6de2d60b2 in __libc_start_main /build/glibc-eX1tMB/glibc-2.31/csu/../csu/libc-start.c:308:16
    #4 0x41c3fd in _start (/tmp/a.out+0x41c3fd)

I'd expect that std::string s{buf, 2, 3}; calls a constructor overload with known bounds (start at 2, length is 3). Why is it calling strlen()? Which overload is used?

0

2 Answers 2

4

Check cpp insights. It is great tool to see what was used during overload resolution.

It generates this:

#include <string>

int main()
{
  char buf[10] = {6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6};
  std::string s = std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >{std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >(buf, std::allocator<char>()), 2, 3};
  return 0;
}

After cleaning up to make this more readable:

#include <string>

int main()
{
  char buf[10] = {6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6};
  std::string s = std::string{std::string(buf), 2, 3};
  return 0;
}

So note that buf is first converted to std::string and this conversion requires strlen. Since your array do not contain terminating zero buffer overflow happens.

7
  • 1
    [string.cons]/6 says a temporary string_view is used, not string. I guess it's not possible to observe the difference, but a string is misleading, since no actual heap allocation happens. Commented Jan 4, 2022 at 17:05
  • Yes since C++17 constructor nr 11 should be used (is should win overload resolution). But tools says it is not used even when C++2a is selected. Also call stack from address sanitizer points to std::string{buf, allocator()} godbolt.org/z/j63EaW33G So maybe bug to compiler should be reported.
    – Marek R
    Commented Jan 4, 2022 at 17:14
  • Could the stack be wrong? I'm looking at libstdc++ implementation (here and here), and it looks like it does the right thing (uses string_view). Commented Jan 4, 2022 at 17:21
  • 1
    Oh my! Thought it was a libstdc++ bug first, but libc++ does the same thing! Should we ask a new question about this? Commented Jan 4, 2022 at 21:53
  • 1
    Here is a question: stackoverflow.com/q/70591571/1387438
    – Marek R
    Commented Jan 5, 2022 at 10:46
3

HolyBlackCat's answer and Marek R's answer explain why it's wrong. Here is a solution using the (pointer, count) constructor:

std::string s{buf + 2, 3};

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.