10

I need to create a schema but it has a column called global, and when I try to write this, I got an error.

class User(BaseModel):

    id:int
    global:bool

I try to use another name, but gives another error when try to save in db.

9
  • 4
    global is a reserved keyword for a reason. Find another name.
    – esqew
    Commented Jan 4, 2022 at 20:36
  • 1
    Something like is_global would be more clear anyway. Why does it have to be called global? Surely there's a way to map python variable names to SQL column names without them needing to be identical. Commented Jan 4, 2022 at 20:38
  • 1
    Keep in mind that global may not be an invalid column name, but it is syntactically invalid in a class statement like this, so you would need to find another way to add the column to your model.
    – chepner
    Commented Jan 4, 2022 at 20:41
  • As an analogous example, something like foo.global = 5 would be a syntax error, but setattr(foo, "global", 5) is perfectly legal.
    – chepner
    Commented Jan 4, 2022 at 20:41
  • 2
    "Just use another name" is rather obtuse. Sometimes we need to parse data from external sources and APIs (e.g. webhooks sent to us) and we don't have any control over their naming conventions.
    – theberzi
    Commented Nov 3, 2022 at 9:29

2 Answers 2

32

It looks like you are using a pydantic module. You can't use the name global because it's a reserved keyword so you need to use this trick to convert it.

pydantic v1:

class User(BaseModel):
    id: int
    global_: bool

    class Config:
        fields = {
            'global_': 'global'
        }

or pydantic v1 & v2:

class User(BaseModel):
    id: int
    global_: bool = Field(..., alias='global')

To create a class you have to use a dictionary (because User(id=1, global=False) also throws an error):

user = User(id=1, global=False)

> Traceback (most recent call last):
> (...)
> File "<input>", line 1
>  User(id=1, global=False)
>             ^^^^^^
> SyntaxError: invalid syntax

user = User(**{'id': 1, 'global': False})

Set allow_population_by_field_name = True or populate_by_name=True in config to allow creating models using both global and global_ names (thanks @GooDeeJAY).

pydantic v1:

class User(BaseModel):
    id: int
    global_: bool = Field(..., alias='global')

    class Config:
        allow_population_by_field_name = True

pydantic v2:

class User(BaseModel):
    id: int
    global_: bool = Field(..., alias='global')
    model_config = ConfigDict(populate_by_name=True)


user1 = User(**{'id': 1, 'global': False})
user2 = User(id=1, global_=False)
assert user1 == user2

By default schema dump will not use aliased fields:

user.dict() # for pydantic v1
user.model_dump() # for pydantic v2
> {'id': 1, 'global_': False}

To get data in the correct schema use by_alias:

user.dict(by_alias=True) # for pydantic v1
user.model_dump(by_alias=True) # for pydantic v2
> {'id': 1, 'global': False}
5
  • 1
    I wonder, why it's not possible (not working) to use global_ as parameter name when creating a new class with reserved keywords...
    – machin
    Commented Nov 3, 2022 at 8:13
  • 1
    @machin It is possible by adding allow_population_by_field_name = True to Config class
    – GooDeeJAY
    Commented Nov 8, 2022 at 14:57
  • @mX0 could you elaborate on the last point that you mentioned? I did not get why we need "User(**{'id': 1, 'global': False})" or "user.dict(by_alias=True)" after we actually defined our schema using one of the two methods that you explained.
    – Sara
    Commented Nov 16, 2023 at 12:39
  • @sara passing global as a named argument is impossible in Python, regardless of what your class definition is. Commented Nov 16, 2023 at 15:39
  • 1
    @Sara ad1. global is a reserved keyword everywhere, you can't use it that way. ad2. you need it for dumping schema with the same fields names as was the input
    – mx0
    Commented Nov 16, 2023 at 15:44
1

To add to the answer above, you can also dump/serialize your model with the correct field name by implementing a custom serializer. For example, like this

class User(BaseModel):
    id: int
    global_: bool = Field(..., alias='global')
    model_config = ConfigDict(populate_by_name=True)

    @pyd.model_serializer(mode='wrap')
    def serializer(self, default_serializer: pyd.SerializerFunctionWrapHandler) -> Dict[str, Any]:
        serialized_self = default_serializer(self)
        serialized_self['global'] = serialized_self['_global']
        del serialized_self['_global']
        return serialized_self

Now user.model_dump() and user.model_dump_json() should produce the correct result.

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