2

I have a program that scans a very large txt file (.pts file actually) that looks like this :

437288479
-6.9465 -20.49 -1.3345 70
-6.6835 -20.82 -1.3335 83
-7.3105 -20.179 -1.3325 77
-7.1005 -20.846 -1.3295 96
-7.3645 -20.759 -1.2585 79
...

The first line is the number of points contained in the file, and every other line corresponds to a {x,y,z,intensity} point in a 3D space. This file above is ~11 GB but I have more files to process that can be up to ~50 GB.

Here's the code I use to read this file :

#include <iostream>
#include <chrono>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>
#include <tuple>
#include <cmath>

// boost library
#include <boost/iostreams/device/mapped_file.hpp>
#include <boost/iostreams/stream.hpp>

struct point
{
    double x;
    double y;
    double z;
};


void readMappedFile()
{
    boost::iostreams::mapped_file_source mmap("my_big_file.pts");
    boost::iostreams::stream<boost::iostreams::mapped_file_source> is(mmap, std::ios::binary);
    std::string line;

    // get rid of the first line
    std::getline(is, line);
    
    while (std::getline(is, line))
    {
        point p;
        sscanf(line.c_str(),"%lf %lf %lf %*d", &(p.x), &(p.y), &(p.z));
        if (p.z > minThreshold && p.z < maxThreshold)
        {
            // do something with p and store it in the vector of tuples
            // O(n) complexity
        }
    }
}

int main ()
{
    readMappedFile();
    return 0;
}

For my 11 GB file, scanning all the lines and storing data in point p takes ~13 minutes to execute. Is there a way to make it way faster ? Because each time I scan a point, I also have to do some stuff with it. Which will make my program to take several hours to execute in the end.

I started looking into using several cores but it seems it could be problematic if some points are linked together for some reason. If you have any advice on how you would proceed, I'll gladly hear about it.

Edit1 : I'm running the program on a laptop with a CPU containing 8 cores - 2.9GHz, ram is 16GB and I'm using an ssd. The program has to run on similar hardware for this purpose.

Edit2 : Here's the complete program so you can tell me what I've been doing wrong. I localize each point in a sort of 2D grid called slab. Each cell will contain a certain amount of points and a z mean value.

#include <iostream>
#include <chrono>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>
#include <tuple>
#include <cmath>

// boost library
#include <boost/iostreams/device/mapped_file.hpp>
#include <boost/iostreams/stream.hpp>

struct point
{
    double x;
    double y;
    double z;
};

/*
    Compute Slab
*/

float slabBox[6] = {-25.,25.,-25.,25.,-1.,0.};
float dx = 0.1;
float dy = 0.1;
int slabSizeX = (slabBox[1] - slabBox[0]) / dx;
int slabSizeY = (slabBox[3] - slabBox[2]) / dy;

std::vector<std::tuple<double, double, double, int>> initSlab() 
{
    // initialize the slab vector according to the grid size
    std::vector<std::tuple<double, double, double, int>> slabVector(slabSizeX * slabSizeY, {0., 0., 0., 0});

    // fill the vector with {x,y} cells coordinates
    for (int y = 0; y < slabSizeY; y++)
    {
        for (int x = 0; x < slabSizeX; x++)
        {
            slabVector[x + y * slabSizeX] = {x * dx + slabBox[0], y * dy + slabBox[2], 0., 0};
        }
    }
    return slabVector;
}

std::vector<std::tuple<double, double, double, int>> addPoint2Slab(point p, std::vector<std::tuple<double, double, double, int>> slabVector)
{
    // find the region {x,y} in the slab in which coord {p.x,p.y} is
    int x = (int) floor((p.x - slabBox[0])/dx);
    int y = (int) floor((p.y - slabBox[2])/dy);
    
    // calculate the new z value
    double z = (std::get<2>(slabVector[x + y * slabSizeX]) * std::get<3>(slabVector[x + y * slabSizeX]) + p.z) / (std::get<3>(slabVector[x + y * slabSizeX]) + 1);

    // replace the older z
    std::get<2>(slabVector[x + y * slabSizeX]) = z;

    // add + 1 point in the cell
    std::get<3>(slabVector[x + y * slabSizeX])++;
    return slabVector;
}

/*
    Parse the file 
*/

void readMappedFile()
{
    boost::iostreams::mapped_file_source mmap("my_big_file.pts");
    boost::iostreams::stream<boost::iostreams::mapped_file_source> is(mmap, std::ios::binary);

    std::string line;
    std::getline(is, line);

    auto slabVector = initSlab();
    
    while (std::getline(is, line))
    {
        point p;
        sscanf(line.c_str(),"%lf %lf %lf %*d", &(p.x), &(p.y), &(p.z));
        if (p.z > slabBox[4] && p.z < slabBox[5])
        {
            slabVector = addPoint2Slab(p, slabVector);
        }
    }
}

int main ()
{
    readMappedFile();
    return 0;
}
14
  • 1
    Get faster computer, or at least store the file on a faster storage device. Jan 5, 2022 at 14:17
  • 2
    Do you know where your program spends most of its time? I could imagine it being in some place you don't expect, like e.g. memory reallocation for the vector you mention. Also, IOStream implementations I have seen actually use memory mapping with a sliding window when using ios_base::binary, so your use of Boost's lib shouldn't be necessary. I'd be happy if you could share numbers though. Jan 5, 2022 at 14:22
  • 2
    Did you profile your code to see where the time is actually being spent? Jan 5, 2022 at 14:35
  • 1
    @Foussy std::vector<std::tuple<double, double, double, int>> addPoint2Slab(point p, std::vector<std::tuple<double, double, double, int>> slabVector) -- You are passing the slabVector vector by value, which incurs a copy of the vector. You should be passing by reference or const reference, not by value. Jan 5, 2022 at 15:03
  • 2
    @Foussy -O3, -O2, etc. are the command-line switches for generating optimized code. If you are not doing this, then all of the timing information you have given us so far is not useful. Once you run an optimized build, update the post with those results. As a matter of fact, any question concerning how fast or slow C++ code is should have the build settings used to compile the program. (I should have asked this up front). Jan 5, 2022 at 15:19

3 Answers 3

3

If you use HDD to store your file just reading with 100Mb/s will spend ~2min and it is a good case. Try to read a block of the file and process it in another thread while the next block will be reading.

Also, you have something like:

std::vector<...> addPoint2Slab(point, std::vector<...> result)
{
    ...
    return result;
}

slabVector = addPoint2Slab(point, slabVector);

I suppose it will bring unnecessary copying of the slabVector on every call (actually, a compiler might optimize it). Try to check speed if you pass vector as follow:

std::vector<...> addPoint2Slab(point, std::vector<...> & result);

And call:

addPoint2Slab(point, slabVector);

And if it will get a speed bonus you can check how to forward results without the overhead.

1

Using memory maps is good. Using IOStreams isn't. Here's a complete take using Boost Spirit to do the parsing:

An Easy Starter

I'd suggest some cleanup around the typenames

using Record = std::tuple<double, double, double, int>;

std::vector<Record> initSlab()
{
    // initialize the slab vector according to the grid size
    std::vector<Record> slabVector(slabSizeX * slabSizeY, {0., 0., 0., 0});

    // fill the vector with {x,y} cells coordinates
    for (int y = 0; y < slabSizeY; y++) {
        for (int x = 0; x < slabSizeX; x++) {
            slabVector[x + y * slabSizeX] = {
                x * dx + slabBox[0],
                y * dy + slabBox[2],
                0.,
                0,
            };
        }
    }
    return slabVector;
}

You could just use a struct instead of the tuple, but that's an exercise for the reader

Don't Copy The SlabVector All The Time

You had addPoint2Slab taking the slabVector by value (copying) and returning the modified vector. Even if that's optimized to a couple of moves, it's still at least allocating a temporary copy each time addPoint2Slab is called. Instead, make it a mutating function as intended:

void addPoint2Slab(point const p, std::vector<Record>& slabVector)
{
    // find the region {x,y} in the slab in which coord {p.x,p.y} is
    int x = (int) floor((p.x - slabBox[0])/dx);
    int y = (int) floor((p.y - slabBox[2])/dy);
    auto& [ix, iy, iz, icount] = slabVector[x + y * slabSizeX];

    iz = (iz * icount + p.z) / (icount + 1);
    icount += 1;
}

Note also that the tuple handling has been greatly simplified with structured bindings. You can even see what the code is doing, which was nearly impossible before - let alone verify.

ReadMappedFile

auto readMappedFile(std::string fname)
{
    auto slabVector = initSlab();

    boost::iostreams::mapped_file_source mmap(fname);

    auto handle = [&](auto& ctx) {
        using boost::fusion::at_c;
        point p{at_c<0>(_attr(ctx)), at_c<1>(_attr(ctx)), at_c<2>(_attr(ctx))};
        //auto intensity = at_c<3>(_attr(ctx));

        if (p.z > slabBox[4] && p.z < slabBox[5])
            addPoint2Slab(p, slabVector);
    };

    namespace x3 = boost::spirit::x3;
    static auto const line_ =
        x3::float_ >> x3::float_ >> x3::float_ >> x3::int_;

    auto first = mmap.data(), last = first + mmap.size();
    try {
        bool ok = x3::phrase_parse( //
            first, last,
            x3::expect[x3::uint_ >> x3::eol] //
                >> line_[handle] % x3::eol   //
                // expect EOF here
                >> *x3::eol >> x3::expect[x3::eoi], //
            x3::blank);

        // ok is true due to the expectation points
        assert(ok);
    } catch (x3::expectation_failure<char const*> const& ef) {
        auto where = ef.where();
        auto till  = std::min(last, where + 32);
        throw std::runtime_error("Expected " + ef.which() + " at #" +
                                 std::to_string(where - mmap.data()) + " '" +
                                 std::string(where, till) + "'...");
    }

    return slabVector;
}

Here we use Boost Spirit X3 to generate a parser that reads the lines and calls handle on each, much like you had before. A modicum of error handling has been added.

Let's Test It

Here's the test driver I used

#include <fmt/ranges.h>
#include <fstream>
#include <random>
#include <ranges>
using std::ranges::views::filter;

int main()
{
    std::string const fname = "T032_OSE.pts";
#if 0 || defined(GENERATE)
    using namespace std;
    // generates a ~12Gib file
    ofstream ofs(fname);
    mt19937  prng{random_device{}()};
    uniform_real_distribution<float> x(-25, 25), y(-25, +25), z(-1, 0);
    uniform_int_distribution<>       n(0, 100);
    auto N = 437288479;
    ofs << N << "\n";
    while (N--)
        ofs << x(prng) << " " << y(prng) << " " << z(prng) << " " << n(prng) << "\n";
#else
    auto sv        = readMappedFile(fname);
    auto has_count = [](Record const& tup) { return get<3>(tup) > 0; };
    fmt::print("slabVector:\n{}\n", fmt::join(sv | filter(has_count), "\n"));
#endif
}

Notice how you can use the conditionally compiled code to generate an input file (because I don't have your large file).

On this ~13GiB file (compressed copy online) it runs in 1m14s on my machine:

slabVector:
(-25, -25, -0.49556059843940164, 1807)
(-24.899999618530273, -25, -0.48971092838941654, 1682)
(-24.799999237060547, -25, -0.49731256076256386, 1731)
(-24.700000762939453, -25, -0.5006042266973916, 1725)
(-24.600000381469727, -25, -0.5000671732885645, 1784)
(-24.5, -25, -0.4940826157717386, 1748)
(-24.399999618530273, -25, -0.5045350563593015, 1720)
(-24.299999237060547, -25, -0.5088279537549671, 1812)
(-24.200000762939453, -25, -0.5065565364794715, 1749)
(-24.100000381469727, -25, -0.4933392542558793, 1743)
(-24, -25, -0.4947248105973453, 1808)
(-23.899999618530273, -25, -0.48640208470636714, 1696)
(-23.799999237060547, -25, -0.4994672590531847, 1711)
(-23.700000762939453, -25, -0.5033631130808075, 1782)
(-23.600000381469727, -25, -0.4995593140170436, 1760)
(-23.5, -25, -0.5009948279948179, 1737)
(-23.399999618530273, -25, -0.4995986820225158, 1732)
(-23.299999237060547, -25, -0.49833906199795897, 1764)
(-23.200000762939453, -25, -0.5013796942594327, 1728)
(-23.100000381469727, -25, -0.5072275248223541, 1700)
(-23, -25, -0.4949060352670081, 1749)
(-22.899999618530273, -25, -0.5026246990689665, 1740)
(-22.799999237060547, -25, -0.493411989775698, 1746)
// ... ~25k lines skipped...
(24.200000762939453, 24.900001525878906, -0.508382879738258, 1746)
(24.299999237060547, 24.900001525878906, -0.5064457874896565, 1740)
(24.400001525878906, 24.900001525878906, -0.4990733400392924, 1756)
(24.5, 24.900001525878906, -0.5063144518978036, 1732)
(24.60000228881836, 24.900001525878906, -0.49988387744959534, 1855)
(24.700000762939453, 24.900001525878906, -0.49970549673984693, 1719)
(24.799999237060547, 24.900001525878906, -0.48656442707683384, 1744)
(24.900001525878906, 24.900001525878906, -0.49267272688797675, 1705)

Remaining Notes

Beware of numerical error. You used float in some places, but with data sets this large it's very likely you will get noticeably large numeric errors in the running average calculation. Consider switching to [long] double or use a "professional" accumulator (many existing correlation frameworks or Boost Accumulator will do better).

Full Code

Live On Compiler Explorer

#include <algorithm>
#include <chrono>
#include <cmath>
#include <iostream>
#include <tuple>
#include <vector>
#include <fmt/ranges.h>

// boost library
#include <boost/iostreams/device/mapped_file.hpp>
#include <boost/iostreams/stream.hpp>

struct point { double x, y, z; };

/*
    Compute Slab
*/
using Float = float; //

Float slabBox[6] = {-25.,25.,-25.,25.,-1.,0.};
Float dx = 0.1;
Float dy = 0.1;
int slabSizeX = (slabBox[1] - slabBox[0]) / dx;
int slabSizeY = (slabBox[3] - slabBox[2]) / dy;

using Record = std::tuple<double, double, double, int>;

std::vector<Record> initSlab()
{
    // initialize the slab vector according to the grid size
    std::vector<Record> slabVector(slabSizeX * slabSizeY, {0., 0., 0., 0});

    // fill the vector with {x,y} cells coordinates
    for (int y = 0; y < slabSizeY; y++) {
        for (int x = 0; x < slabSizeX; x++) {
            slabVector[x + y * slabSizeX] = {
                x * dx + slabBox[0],
                y * dy + slabBox[2],
                0.,
                0,
            };
        }
    }
    return slabVector;
}

void addPoint2Slab(point const p, std::vector<Record>& slabVector)
{
    // find the region {x,y} in the slab in which coord {p.x,p.y} is
    int x = (int) floor((p.x - slabBox[0])/dx);
    int y = (int) floor((p.y - slabBox[2])/dy);
    auto& [ix, iy, iz, icount] = slabVector[x + y * slabSizeX];

    iz = (iz * icount + p.z) / (icount + 1);
    icount += 1;
}

/* Parse the file */
#include <boost/spirit/home/x3.hpp>

auto readMappedFile(std::string fname)
{
    auto slabVector = initSlab();

    boost::iostreams::mapped_file_source mmap(fname);

    auto handle = [&](auto& ctx) {
        using boost::fusion::at_c;
        point p{at_c<0>(_attr(ctx)), at_c<1>(_attr(ctx)), at_c<2>(_attr(ctx))};
        //auto intensity = at_c<3>(_attr(ctx));

        if (p.z > slabBox[4] && p.z < slabBox[5])
            addPoint2Slab(p, slabVector);
    };

    namespace x3 = boost::spirit::x3;
    static auto const line_ =
        x3::double_ >> x3::double_ >> x3::double_ >> x3::int_;

    auto first = mmap.data(), last = first + mmap.size();
    try {
        bool ok = x3::phrase_parse( //
            first, last,
            x3::expect[x3::uint_ >> x3::eol] //
                >> line_[handle] % x3::eol   //
                // expect EOF here
                >> *x3::eol >> x3::expect[x3::eoi], //
            x3::blank);

        // ok is true due to the expectation points
        assert(ok);
    } catch (x3::expectation_failure<char const*> const& ef) {
        auto where = ef.where();
        auto till  = std::min(last, where + 32);
        throw std::runtime_error("Expected " + ef.which() + " at #" +
                                 std::to_string(where - mmap.data()) + " '" +
                                 std::string(where, till) + "'...");
    }

    return slabVector;
}

#include <fmt/ranges.h>
#include <fstream>
#include <random>
#include <ranges>
using std::ranges::views::filter;

int main()
{
    std::string const fname = "T032_OSE.pts";
#if 0 || defined(GENERATE)
    using namespace std;
    // generates a ~12Gib file
    ofstream ofs(fname);
    mt19937  prng{random_device{}()};
    uniform_real_distribution<Float> x(-25, 25), y(-25, +25), z(-1, 0);
    uniform_int_distribution<>       n(0, 100);
    auto N = 437288479;
    ofs << N << "\n";
    while (N--)
        ofs << x(prng) << " " << y(prng) << " " << z(prng) << " " << n(prng) << "\n";
#else
    auto sv        = readMappedFile(fname);
    auto has_count = [](Record const& tup) { return get<3>(tup) > 0; };
    fmt::print("slabVector:\n{}\n", fmt::join(sv | filter(has_count), "\n"));
#endif
}
4
  • The compressed copy is still "pretty groß" (4.5GiB) so I'm probably not leaving it for a long time. But certainly enough time for others to repro/benchmark with.
    – sehe
    Jan 6, 2022 at 19:56
  • Okay, got it down to 3GiB with XZ. I will be retiring the bz2 soonish, and the xz can stay up a little longer
    – sehe
    Jan 6, 2022 at 20:49
  • Just out of curiosity, skipping the fix to addPoint2Slab return value approach results in a slowdown so great that I wasn't able to await the process completion. I killed it at 37m28s and counting. No idea how far it came.
    – sehe
    Jan 7, 2022 at 0:13
  • 1
    That's neat ! Thanks for all the tips
    – Foussy
    Jan 7, 2022 at 13:53
1

Get rid of std::getline. iostreams are pretty slow compared to direct "inmemory" processing of strings. Also do not use sscanf.

Allocate a large chunk of memory, i.e. 128MB or more. Read all of it from file in one call. Then parse this chunk until you reach the end.

Sort of like this:

std::vector<char> huge_chunk(128*1024*1024);
ifstream in("my_file");
do {
   in.read(huge_chunk.data(), huge_chunk.size());
   parse(huge_chunk.data, in.gcount());
} while (in.good());

you get the idea.

Parse the chunk with strtof, find and the like.

Parsing the chunk will leave a few characters at the end of the chunk which do not form a complete line. You need to store them temporarily and resume parsing the next chunk from there.

Generally speaking: The fewer calls to ifstream, the better. And using "lower API" functions such as strtof, strtoul etc... is usually faster than sscanf, format etc...

This usually does not matter for small files <1MB, but can make a huge difference with very large files.

Also: Use a profiler to find out exactly where your program is waiting. Intels VTune profiler is free, afaik. It is part of the OneAPI Toolkit and is one of the best tools I know.

0

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