37

How can I detect lock/unlock events on the iPhone? Assuming it's only possible for jailbroken devices, can you point me to the correct API?

By lock events, I mean showing or hiding the Lock Screen (which might need a password to unlock, or not).

1
  • what do you mean by "lock/unlock events"?
    – Rog
    Apr 1 '09 at 19:24

10 Answers 10

23

You can use Darwin notifications, to listen for the events. From my testing on a jailbroken iOS 5.0.1 iPhone 4, I think that one of these events might be what you need:

com.apple.springboard.lockstate
com.apple.springboard.lockcomplete

Note: according to the poster's comments to a similar question I answered here, this should work on a non-jailbroken phone, too.

To use this, register for the event like this (this registers for just the first event above, but you can add an observer for lockcomplete, too):

CFNotificationCenterAddObserver(CFNotificationCenterGetDarwinNotifyCenter(), //center
                                (void*)self, // observer (can be NULL)
                                lockStateChanged, // callback
                                CFSTR("com.apple.springboard.lockstate"), // event name
                                NULL, // object
                                CFNotificationSuspensionBehaviorDeliverImmediately);

where lockStateChanged is your event callback:

static void lockStateChanged(CFNotificationCenterRef center, void *observer, CFStringRef name, const void *object, CFDictionaryRef userInfo) {
    NSLog(@"event received!");
    if (observer != NULL) {
        MyClass *this = (MyClass*)observer;
    }

    // you might try inspecting the `userInfo` dictionary, to see 
    //  if it contains any useful info
    if (userInfo != nil) {
        CFShow(userInfo);
    }
}

The lockstate event occurs when the device is locked and unlocked, but the lockcomplete event is only triggered when the device locks. Another way to determine whether the event is for a lock or unlock event is to use notify_get_state(). You'll get a different value for lock vs. unlock, as described here.

13
  • 1
    I used this one on iOS 8 with iPhone 6, and still works. Just bare in mind that this it's C and not Objective-C, also the function it's static so if you want to change something in your View Controller you can pass it down with as the observer instead of NULL. Careful with reference counting too. Apr 20 '15 at 21:35
  • 1
    @thibautnoah, why not? There are no other ways of getting this information directly. The accelerometer answer below involves significant battery drain.
    – Nate
    Dec 29 '15 at 21:44
  • 1
    @thibautnoah When your code is sending out the notifications, you can choose to use the NSDistributedNotificationCenter if you like. In this case, we are listening for notifications that our code does not generate. We have no control over which notification center iOS uses. It turns out that iOS uses the Darwin notifications system to post an event when the lock status changes. We can't control that. My answer simply shows how you listen for this event. Does that make sense?
    – Nate
    Dec 30 '15 at 22:15
  • 1
    @RahulPatel, I don't work for Apple, so I can't say for sure. The CFNotificationCenterAddObserver() API is public, so that should be fine. The com.apple.springboard.lockstate string is undocumented, so it might be a problem. But, I would guess that it would be approved. You could always obfuscate that string if you're worried.
    – Nate
    Apr 20 '17 at 8:39
  • 1
    @Moxarth, the comment section is not the place for long discussions with many separate questions. If you are having trouble getting this to work, you should post a new question here, showing the code you are trying to use. You can link to this question and answer as well, but this isn't enough information for me to help you.
    – Nate
    Dec 14 '17 at 0:38
13

Round about answer:

Application will resign active gets called in all sorts of scenarios... and from all my testing, even if your application stays awake while backgrounded, there are no ways to determine that the screen is locked (CPU speed doesn't report, BUS speed remains the same, mach_time denom / numer doesn't change)...

However, it seems Apple does turn off the accelerometer when the device is locked... Enable iPhone accelerometer while screen is locked (tested iOS4.2 on iPhone 4 has this behavior)

Thus...

In your application delegate:

- (void)applicationWillResignActive:(UIApplication *)application
{
    NSLog(@"STATUS - Application will Resign Active");
    // Start checking the accelerometer (while we are in the background)
    [[UIAccelerometer sharedAccelerometer] setDelegate:self];
    [[UIAccelerometer sharedAccelerometer] setUpdateInterval:1]; // Ping every second
    _notActiveTimer = [NSTimer scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval:2 target:self selector:@selector(deviceDidLock) userInfo:nil repeats:NO]; // 2 seconds for wiggle

}
//Deprecated in iOS5
- (void)accelerometer:(UIAccelerometer *)accelerometer didAccelerate:(UIAcceleration *)acceleration
{
    NSLog(@"STATUS - Update from accelerometer");
    [_notActiveTimer invalidate];
    _notActiveTimer = [NSTimer scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval:2 target:self selector:@selector(deviceDidLock) userInfo:nil repeats:NO];
}

- (void)deviceDidLock
{
    NSLog(@"STATUS - Device locked!");
    [[UIAccelerometer sharedAccelerometer] setDelegate:nil];
    _notActiveTimer = nil;
}

- (void)applicationDidBecomeActive:(UIApplication *)application
{
    NSLog(@"STATUS - Application did become active");
    [[UIAccelerometer sharedAccelerometer] setDelegate:nil];
    [_notActiveTimer invalidate];
    _notActiveTimer = nil;
}

I know... It's kind of a hack, but it has worked like a charm for me so far. Please update if you see any issues that prevent this from working.

7
  • - (void)accelerometer:(UIAccelerometer *)accelerometer didAccelerate:(UIAcceleration *)acceleration is deprecated.
    – Pedro Rolo
    Nov 20 '12 at 17:54
  • @BadPirate I tried this code and gets accelerometer data even when device is locked.
    – Geek
    Jan 24 '14 at 10:00
  • Uh oh @Geek my guess is this has to do with the new iPhone 5s and it's low energy motion chips (that might continue to function after locking)... Anyone else verify this?
    – BadPirate
    Jan 24 '14 at 22:49
  • @BadPirate I tested on iPhone 4.
    – Geek
    Jan 25 '14 at 10:47
7

There is a prettier way of telling apart task switching and screen locking-originated applicationWillResignActive: callbacks which doesn't even involve undocumented features such as the accelerometer state.

When the app is moving to the background, the app delegate is first sent an applicationWillResignActive:, then an applicationDidEnterBackground:. When the app is interrupted by pressing the Lock button or by an incoming phone call, the latter method is not called. We can use this information to distinguish between the two scenarios.

Say you want to be called back in the screenLockActivated method if the screen gets locked. Here's the magic:

- (void)applicationWillResignActive:(UIApplication*)aApplication
{
    [self performSelector:@selector(screenLockActivated)
               withObject:nil
               afterDelay:0];
}

- (void)applicationDidEnterBackground:(UIApplication*)aApplication
{
    [NSObject cancelPreviousPerformRequestsWithTarget:self];
}

- (void)screenLockActivated
{
    NSLog(@"yaay");
}

Explanation:

By default, we assume that every call to applicationWillResignActive: is because of an active->inactive state transition (as when locking the screen) but we generously let the system prove the contrary within a timeout (in this case, a single runloop cycle) by delaying the call to screenLockActivated. In case the screen gets locked, the system finishes the current runloop cycle without touching any other delegate methods. If, however, this is an active->background state transition, it also invokes applicationDidEnterBackground: before the end of the cycle, which allows us to simply cancel the previously scheduled request from there, thus preventing it from being called when it's not supposed to.

Enjoy!

2
  • 1
    Unfortunately, sometimes you need to distinguish cases, when phone was locked and when app was put to inactive state by notification center tab or by task switching tab (
    – fspirit
    Feb 8 '12 at 12:09
  • 4
    I can't reproduce this now in iOS 5.1, applicationDidEnterBackground always get called by locking the screen
    – overboming
    Sep 5 '12 at 6:54
7

As of the time of writing there are two fairly reliable ways to detect device locking:


Data Protection

By enabling the Data Protection entitlement your app can subscribe to the applicationProtectedDataWillBecomeUnavailable: and applicationProtectedDataDidBecomeAvailable: notifications to determine with high probability when a device that uses passcode/TouchID Authentication is locked/unlocked. To determine if a device uses a passcode/TouchID LAContext can be queried.

Caveats: This method relies on the "protected data becoming unavailable" coinciding with the phone being locked. When the phone is using TouchID and the sleep/lock button is pressed then the phone is locked, protected data becomes unavailable, and a passcode will immediately be required to unlock it again. This means that protected data becoming unavailable essentially indicates that the phone has been locked. This is not necessarily true when someone is using just a passcode since they can set the "requires passcode" time to anywhere from immediately to something like 4 hours. In this case the phone will report being able to handle protected data but locking the phone will not result in protected data becoming unavailable for quite some time.


Lifecycle Timing

If your app is in the foreground there will be a noticeable change in time difference between the two lifecycle events UIApplicationWillResignActiveNotification and UIApplicationDidEnterBackgroundNotification depending on what triggers them.

(This was tested in iOS 10 and may change in future releases)

Pressing the home button results in a significant delay between the two (even when the Reduced Motion setting is enabled):

15:23:42.517 willResignActive
15:23:43.182 didEnterBackground
15:23:43.184 difference: 0.666346

Locking the device while the app is open creates a more trivial (<~0.2s) delay between the two events:

15:22:59.236 willResignActive
15:22:59.267 didEnterBackground
15:22:59.267 difference: 0.031404
2
  • Thanks @Warpling. I've been listening on UIApplicationProtectedDataWillBecomeUnavailable and have found that it usually doesn't fire when the screen is locked -- although it does occasionally. However, I get notified on UIApplicationProtectedDataDidBecomeAvailable every time the device is unlocked. Any ideas why that might be? Jan 8 '19 at 18:21
  • 1
    @VikasYendluri A few things come to mind that might affect this like if the device is set to require passcode immediately (this should be true if using any biometric authentication method) and if your app is doing anything in the background that would prevent it from being suspended when backgrounded.
    – Warpling
    Jan 11 '19 at 19:24
5

in iOS 8, you lock the screen or push the home button, all of those make app push in background, but you don't know which operator result in this. My solution same with Nits007ak,use notify_register_dispatch to get state.

#import <notify.h>
        int notify_token
        notify_register_dispatch("com.apple.springboard.lockstate",
                             &notify_token,
                             dispatch_get_main_queue(),
                             ^(int token)
                             {
                                 uint64_t state = UINT64_MAX;
                                 notify_get_state(token, &state);
                                 if(state == 0) {
                                     NSLog(@"unlock device");
                                 } else {
                                     NSLog(@"lock device");
                                 }
                             }
                             );

As long as the app is running, in foreground or background. not suspend, you can get this event.

And you can use notify_token as parameter of notify_get_state to get current state anywhere, this is useful when you want know the state and the screen state don't change.

2
  • 1
    there is any way of doing this in swift? May 27 '15 at 22:05
  • @VanditMehta yet it gets called after moving to foreground with a correct state Jun 11 '19 at 11:11
4

If passcode is set, you can use these event in AppDelegate

-(void)applicationProtectedDataWillBecomeUnavailable:(UIApplication *)application
{
}

- (void)applicationProtectedDataDidBecomeAvailable:(UIApplication *)application
{
}
1
  • Of all the posts, I think this is the best answer for lock state. Aug 7 '18 at 12:59
4

Just import #import notify.h before using this code. enjoy!!

-(void)registerAppforDetectLockState {

    int notify_token;
        notify_register_dispatch("com.apple.springboard.lockstate", &notify_token,dispatch_get_main_queue(), ^(int token) {

        uint64_t state = UINT64_MAX;
        notify_get_state(token, &state);

        if(state == 0) {
            NSLog(@"unlock device");
        } else {
            NSLog(@"lock device");
        }

        NSLog(@"com.apple.springboard.lockstate = %llu", state);
        UILocalNotification *notification = [[UILocalNotification alloc]init];
        notification.repeatInterval = NSDayCalendarUnit;
        [notification setAlertBody:@"Hello world!! I come becoz you lock/unlock your device :)"];
        notification.alertAction = @"View";
        notification.alertAction = @"Yes";
        [notification setFireDate:[NSDate dateWithTimeIntervalSinceNow:1]];
        notification.soundName = UILocalNotificationDefaultSoundName;
        [notification setTimeZone:[NSTimeZone  defaultTimeZone]];

        [[UIApplication sharedApplication] presentLocalNotificationNow:notification];

    });
}
6
  • It works only if you app remain active in background, like app which use background location mode.
    – Zee
    Apr 13 '15 at 9:46
  • yes exactly. you can detect lock and unlock if app is running background forever.
    – Nits007ak
    Apr 17 '15 at 11:16
  • But its works until you lock when your app is in foreground and device is locked Jun 10 '16 at 19:54
  • How to add background support to this? Nov 18 '16 at 11:13
  • You can use location manager to continue run app in background.
    – Nits007ak
    Nov 18 '16 at 17:16
2

From a lot of trial and error, discovered monitoring the blank screen, lock complete and lock state events gives a consistent lock screen indicator. You'll need to monitor a state transition.

// call back
void displayStatusChanged(CFNotificationCenterRef center, void *observer, CFStringRef name, const void *object, CFDictionaryRef userInfo)
{
    // notification comes in order of
    // "com.apple.springboard.hasBlankedScreen" notification
    // "com.apple.springboard.lockcomplete" notification only if locked
    // "com.apple.springboard.lockstate" notification

    AppDelegate *appDelegate = CFBridgingRelease(observer);

    NSString *eventName = (__bridge NSString*)name;
    NSLog(@"Darwin notification NAME = %@",name);

    if([eventName isEqualToString:@"com.apple.springboard.hasBlankedScreen"])
    {
        NSLog(@"SCREEN BLANK");

        appDelegate.bDeviceLocked = false; // clear
    }
    else if([eventName isEqualToString:@"com.apple.springboard.lockcomplete"])
    {
        NSLog(@"DEVICE LOCK");

        appDelegate.bDeviceLocked = true; // set
    }
    else if([eventName isEqualToString:@"com.apple.springboard.lockstate"])
    {
        NSLog(@"LOCK STATUS CHANGE");

        if(appDelegate.bDeviceLocked) // if a lock, is set
        {
            NSLog(@"DEVICE IS LOCKED");
        }
        else
        {
            NSLog(@"DEVICE IS UNLOCKED");
        }
    }
}

-(void)registerforDeviceLockNotif
{
    // screen and lock notifications
    CFNotificationCenterAddObserver(CFNotificationCenterGetDarwinNotifyCenter(), //center
                                    CFBridgingRetain(self), // observer
                                    displayStatusChanged, // callback
                                    CFSTR("com.apple.springboard.hasBlankedScreen"), // event name
                                    NULL, // object
                                    CFNotificationSuspensionBehaviorDeliverImmediately);

    CFNotificationCenterAddObserver(CFNotificationCenterGetDarwinNotifyCenter(), //center
                                    CFBridgingRetain(self), // observer
                                    displayStatusChanged, // callback
                                    CFSTR("com.apple.springboard.lockcomplete"), // event name
                                    NULL, // object
                                    CFNotificationSuspensionBehaviorDeliverImmediately);

    CFNotificationCenterAddObserver(CFNotificationCenterGetDarwinNotifyCenter(), //center
                                    CFBridgingRetain(self), // observer
                                    displayStatusChanged, // callback
                                    CFSTR("com.apple.springboard.lockstate"), // event name
                                    NULL, // object
                                    CFNotificationSuspensionBehaviorDeliverImmediately);
}

To have the screen lock indicators run in the background, you need to implement background processing calling the following upon app launching.

- (BOOL)application:(UIApplication *)application didFinishLaunchingWithOptions:(NSDictionary *)launchOptions
{
    self.backgroundTaskIdentifier =
    [[UIApplication sharedApplication] beginBackgroundTaskWithExpirationHandler:^{

        [[UIApplication sharedApplication] endBackgroundTask:self.backgroundTaskIdentifier];
    }];

    [self registerforDeviceLockNotif];
}
1
1

If your app is running and the user locks the device your app delegate will receive a call to 'application Will Resign Active:'. If your app was running when locked, it will receive a call to 'application Did Become Active:' when the device is unlocked. But you get the same calls to your app if the user gets a phone call and then chooses to ignore it. You can't tell the difference as far as I know.

And if your app wasn't running at any of these times there is no way to be notified since your app isn't running.

1
  • Useful, but I think the user wants to detect just the "lock" event. These methods will fire regardless of whether the user presses the "Home" button or "Lock" button.
    – user298261
    Nov 20 '13 at 18:20
-3

The simplest way to get screen lock and unlock events are by adding event observers using NSNotificationCenter in your viewcontroller. I added the following observer in the viewdidload method. This is what i did:

[[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] addObserver:self
                                         selector:@selector(applicationEnteredForeground:)
                                             name:UIApplicationWillEnterForegroundNotification
                                           object:nil];

Then I added the following selector to the viewcontroller. This selector will get called when the screen is unlocked.

 - (void)applicationEnteredForeground:(NSNotification *)notification {
    NSLog(@"Application Entered Foreground");
    }

If you want to detect the event when screen gets locked, you can replace UIApplicationWillEnterForegroundNotification with UIApplicationDidEnterBackgroundNotification.

1
  • 1
    This is incorrect. This will also detect the app coming to the foreground after an app switch.
    – jcaron
    Dec 30 '15 at 13:44

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