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I'm trying to implement a gradient-free optimizer function to train convolutional neural networks with Julia using Flux.jl. The reference paper is this: https://arxiv.org/abs/2005.05955. This paper proposes RSO, a gradient-free optimization algorithm updates single weight at a time on a sampling bases. The pseudocode of this algorithm is depicted in the picture below.

optimizer_pseudocode

I'm using MNIST dataset.

function train(; kws...)
args = Args(; kws...) # collect options in a stuct for convinience

if CUDA.functional() && args.use_cuda
    @info "Training on CUDA GPU"
    CUDA.allwoscalar(false)
    device = gpu
else
    @info "Training on CPU"
    device = cpu
end

# Prepare datasets
x_train, x_test, y_train, y_test = getdata(args, device)

# Create DataLoaders (mini-batch iterators)
train_loader = DataLoader((x_train, y_train), batchsize=args.batchsize, shuffle=true)
test_loader = DataLoader((x_test, y_test), batchsize=args.batchsize)

# Construct model
model = build_model() |> device
ps = Flux.params(model) # model's trainable parameters

best_param = ps
if args.optimiser == "SGD"
    # Regular training step with SGD

elseif args.optimiser == "RSO"
    # Run RSO function and update ps
    best_param .= RSO(x_train, y_train, args.RSOupdate, model, args.batchsize, device)
end

And the corresponding RSO function:

function RSO(X,L,C,model, batch_size, device)
"""
model = convolutional model structure
X = Input data
L = labels
C = Number of rounds to update parameters
W = Weight set of layers
Wd = Weight tensors of layer d that generates an activation
wid = weight tensor that generates an activation aᵢ
wj = a weight in wid
"""

# Normalize input data to have zero mean and unit standard deviation
X .= (X .- sum(X))./std(X)
train_loader = DataLoader((X, L), batchsize=batch_size, shuffle=true)

#println("model = $(typeof(model))")

std_prep = []
σ_d = Float64[]
D = 1
for layer in model
    D += 1
    Wd = Flux.params(layer)
    # Initialize the weights of the network with Gaussian distribution
    for id in Wd
        wj = convert(Array{Float32, 4}, rand(Normal(0, sqrt(2/length(id))), (3,3,4,4)))
        id = wj
        append!(std_prep, vec(wj))
    end
    # Compute std of all elements in the weight tensor Wd
    push!(σ_d, std(std_prep))
end

W = Flux.params(model)

# Weight update
for _ in 1:C
    d = D
    while d > 0
        for id in 1:length(W[d])
            # Randomly sample change in weights from Gaussian distribution
            for j in 1:length(w[d][id])
                # Randomly sample mini-batch
                (x, l) = train_loader[rand(1:length(train_loader))]
                
                # Sample a weight from normal distribution
                ΔWj[d][id][j] = rand(Normal(0, σ_d[d]), 1)

                loss, acc = loss_and_accuracy(data_loader, model, device)
                W = argmin(F(x,l, W+ΔWj), F(x,l,W), F(x,l, W-ΔWj))
            end
        end
        d -= 1
    end
end

return W
end

The problem here is the second block of the RSO function. I'm trying to evaluate the loss with the change of single weight in three scenarios, which are F(w, l, W+gW), F(w, l, W), F(w, l, W-gW), and choose the weight-set with minimum loss. But how do I do that using Flux.jl? The loss function I'm trying to use is logitcrossentropy(ŷ, y, agg=sum). In order to generate y_hat, we should use model(W), but changing single weight parameter in Zygote.Params() form was already challenging....

2 Answers 2

3

Based on the paper you shared, it looks like you need to change the weight arrays per each output neuron per each layer. Unfortunately, this means that the implementation of your optimization routine is going to depend on the layer type, since an "output neuron" for a convolution layer is quite different than a fully-connected layer. In other words, just looping over Flux.params(model) is not going to be sufficient, since this is just a set of all the weight arrays in the model and each weight array is treated differently depending on which layer it comes from.

Fortunately, Julia's multiple dispatch does make this easier to write if you use separate functions instead of a giant loop. I'll summarize the algorithm using the pseudo-code below:

for layer in model
  for output_neuron in layer
    for weight_element in parameters(output_neuron)
      weight_element = sample(N(0, sqrt(2 / num_outputs(layer))))
    end
  end
  sigmas[layer] = stddev(parameters(layer))
end

for c in 1 to C
  for layer in reverse(model)
    for output_neuron in layer
      for weight_element in parameters(output_neuron)
        x, y = sample(batches)
        dw = N(0, sigmas[layer])
        # optimize weights
      end
    end
  end
end

It's the for output_neuron ... portions that we need to isolate into separate functions.

In the first block, we don't actually do anything different to every weight_element, they are all sampled from the same normal distribution. So, we don't actually need to iterate the output neurons, but we do need to know how many there are.

using Statistics: std

# this function will set the weights according to the
# normal distribution and the number of output neurons
# it also returns the standard deviation of the weights
function sample_weight!(layer::Dense)
  sample = randn(eltype(layer.weight), size(layer.weight))
  num_outputs = size(layer.weight, 1)
  # notice the "." notation which is used to mutate the array
  layer.weight .= sample .* num_outputs

  return std(layer.weight)
end

function sample_weight!(layer::Conv)
  sample = randn(eltype(layer.weight), size(layer.weight))
  num_outputs = size(layer.weight, 4)
  # notice the "." notation which is used to mutate the array
  layer.weight .= sample .* num_outputs

  return std(layer.weight)
end

sigmas = map(sample_weights!, model)

Now, for the second block, we will do a similar trick by defining different functions for each layer.

function optimize_layer!(loss, layer::Dense, data, sigma)
  for i in 1:size(layer.weight, 1)
    for j in 1:size(layer.weight, 2)
      wj = layer.weight[i, j]
      x, y = data[rand(1:length(data))]
      dw = randn() * sigma
      ws = [wj + dw, wj, wj - dw]
      losses = Float32[]
      for (k, w) in enumerate(ws)
        layer.weight[i, j] = w
        losses[k] = loss(x, y)
      end
      layer.weight[i, j] = ws[argmin(losses)]
    end
  end
end

function optimize_layer!(loss, layer::Conv, data, sigma)
  for i in 1:size(layer.weight, 4)
    # we use a view to reference the full kernel
    # for this output channel
    wid = view(layer.weight, :, :, :, i)
    
    # each index let's us treat wid like a vector
    for j in eachindex(wid)
      wj = wid[j]
      x, y = data[rand(1:length(data))]
      dw = randn() * sigma
      ws = [wj + dw, wj, wj - dw]
      losses = Float32[]
      for (k, w) in enumerate(ws)
        wid[j] = w
        losses[k] = loss(x, y)
      end
      wid[j] = ws[argmin(losses)]
    end
  end
end

for c in 1:C
  for (layer, sigma) in reverse(zip(model, sigmas))
    optimize_layer!(layer, data, sigma) do x, y
      logitcrossentropy(model(x), y; agg = sum)
    end
  end
end

Notice that nowhere did I use Flux.params which does not help us here. Also, Flux.params would include both the weight and bias, and the paper doesn't look like it bothers with the bias at all. If you had an optimization method that generically optimized any parameter regardless of layer type the same (i.e. like gradient descent), then you could use for p in Flux.params(model) ....

1

Thanks @darsnack :)

I found your answer a bit late, so in the meantime I could figure out my own script that works. Mine is indeed a bit hardcoded but could you also give feedback on this?

function RSO(train_loader, test_loader, C,model, batch_size, device, args)
"""
model = convolutional model structure
C = Number of rounds to update parameters (epochs)
batch_size = size of the mini batch that will be used to calculate loss
device = CPU or GPU
"""

# Evaluate initial weight
test_loss, test_acc = loss_and_accuracy(test_loader, model, device)
println("Initial Weight:")
println("   test_loss = $test_loss, test_accuracy = $test_acc")

random_batch = []
for (x, l) in train_loader
    push!(random_batch, (x,l))
end

# Initialize weights
std_prep = []
σ_d = Float64[]
D = 0
for layer in model
    D += 1
    Wd = Flux.params(layer)
    # Initialize the weights of the network with Gaussian distribution
    for id in Wd
        if typeof(id) == Array{Float32, 4}
            wj = convert(Array{Float32, 4}, rand(Normal(0, sqrt(2/length(id))), size(id)))
        elseif typeof(id) == Vector{Float32}
            wj = convert(Vector{Float32}, rand(Normal(0, sqrt(2/length(id))), length(id)))
        elseif typeof(id) == Matrix{Float32}
            wj = convert(Matrix{Float32}, rand(Normal(0, sqrt(2/length(id))), size(id)))
        end
        id = wj
        append!(std_prep, vec(wj))
    end
    # Compute std of all elements in the weight tensor Wd
    push!(σ_d, std(std_prep))
end

# Weight update
for c in 1:C
    d = D
    # First update the weights of the layer closest to the labels 
    # and then sequentially move closer to the input
    while d > 0
        Wd = Flux.params(model[d])
        for id in Wd
            # Randomly sample change in weights from Gaussian distribution
            for j in 1:length(id)
                # Randomly sample mini-batch
                (x, y) = rand(random_batch, 1)[1]
                x, y = device(x), device(y)
                
                # Sample a weight from normal distribution
                ΔWj = rand(Normal(0, σ_d[d]), 1)[1]

                # Weight update with three scenario
                ## F(x,l, W+ΔWj)
                id[j] = id[j]+ΔWj
                ŷ = model(x)
                ls_pos = logitcrossentropy(ŷ, y, agg=sum) / size(x)[end]

                ## F(x,l,W)
                id[j] = id[j]-ΔWj
                ŷ = model(x)
                ls_org = logitcrossentropy(ŷ, y, agg=sum) / size(x)[end]

                ## F(x,l, W-ΔWj)
                id[j] = id[j]-ΔWj
                ŷ = model(x)
                ls_neg = logitcrossentropy(ŷ, y, agg=sum) / size(x)[end]

                # Check weight update that gives minimum loss
                min_loss = argmin([ls_org, ls_pos, ls_neg])

                # Save weight update with minimum loss
                if min_loss == 1
                    id[j] = id[j] + ΔWj
                elseif min_loss == 2
                    id[j] = id[j] + 2*ΔWj
                elseif min_loss == 3
                    id[j] = id[j]
                end
    
            end
        end
        d -= 1
    end

    train_loss, train_acc = loss_and_accuracy(train_loader, model, device)
    test_loss, test_acc = loss_and_accuracy(test_loader, model, device)

    track!(args.tracker, test_acc)

    println("RSO Round=$c")
    println("   train_loss = $train_loss, train_accuracy = $train_acc")
    println("   test_loss = $test_loss, test_accuracy = $test_acc")

end

return Flux.params(model)
end
4
  • I think the main difference between your code and the paper is how the weights are adjusted with respect to each "output neuron" of a layer. So, Wd in the second block is the weight and bias of a layer (which could be either a Dense or Conv). for id in Wd iterates each parameter (e.g. weight then bias), while for j in 1:length(id) iterates every element in the weight. In contrast, the paper modifies a complete row of the Dense weight or channel of Conv weight at once. So there's a mismatch here between the algorithm in the paper and your code.
    – darsnack
    Jan 25 at 18:13
  • 1
    Also, note the typeof(id) == if-else code in your first block is replicating the multiple-dispatch approach that I suggested in my version. While your version should work, it is not recommended to write Julia code this way, and it hardcodes the meaning of Array{Float32, 4} to mean "convolution weight." I would not recommend forcing this meaning if you want your function to work on arbitrary models. It would be better practice to dispatch based on the type of the layer instead of the weight parameter.
    – darsnack
    Jan 25 at 18:16
  • Thanks :0 But I'm confused... The main concept of the paper is to update one weight at a time, which is to update w_j. If I understood correctly, Figure 2 in the paper shows that Wd is a weight set in one layer, and Wid is a set of weights that generates an activation in the layer. Then, Wj is one of the weights of Wid. So I don't get where you found the fact that the paper modified a complete row of weight at once... Jan 28 at 18:51
  • Yes, that's correct, but the distributions used to initialize each element is based on wid (per activation). length(id) will give you the number of elements in the entire parameter tensor, not the number of "output neurons."
    – darsnack
    Jan 29 at 17:16

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