11

This smells bad:

let millis = time % 1000;
match millis {
    0..=199 => do_something(),
    200..=599 => do_something_else(),
    600..=999 => do_something_altogether_different(),
    _ => panic!("There are only 1,000 ms in a second."),
}

The "_" case will never be called, as millis is time % 1000.

How can I rewrite this so that I only have three branches?

Ideally, I'd also like to remove the duplication that is 199/200, 599/600 and 999/1000/0.

If the best solution is not a match I'm happy to use some other control structure.

2
  • 1
    I see you're using Rust. Guess what happens when time is a negative number? (which, given that you're only showing this code, might very well be the case under certain circumstances). That _ case, given the code you're showing, is absolutely a possibility given the modulo operator, and having a code path in place for "what the heck just happened?" is an excellent idea. Jan 11 at 22:29

4 Answers 4

16

Rust uses the type for matching, so it doesn't know the bounds as per your logic. But you do.

For being explicit you can use unreachable!:

Indicates unreachable code.

This is useful any time that the compiler can’t determine that some code is unreachable. For example:

Match arms with guard conditions. Loops that dynamically terminate. Iterators that dynamically terminate. If the determination that the code is unreachable proves incorrect, the program immediately terminates with a panic!.

let millis = time % 1000;
match millis {
    0..=199 => do_something(),
    200..=599 => do_something_else(),
    600..=999 => do_something_altogether_different(),
    _ => unreachable!("There are only 1,000 ms in a second."),
}

Otherwise you can consider that the last branch is the default one:

let millis = time % 1000;
match millis {
    0..=199 => do_something(),
    200..=599 => do_something_else(),
    _ => do_something_altogether_different(),
}
4
  • 2
    Note that you can just type unreachable!() for brevity - since the code can't be reached, a message is superfluous. But in this case, when the modulo is so close to the match, the second option is probably what I'd choose. Sometimes simple "obvious" solutions are the best and the hardest to come up with - thanks for including it in the answer. Jan 11 at 8:04
  • @user4815162342, yes, I actually edited the answer to add the message on porpoise as part of documenting the reason itself (just for the example). Default branch would be my good to go too.
    – Netwave
    Jan 11 at 8:09
  • 1
    That's probably a matter of taste - I'd say that here the "reason" just adds noise and detracts from the readability more than it actually helps the future reader/reviewer. But that's just nitpicking, the maintainability equivalent of bikeshedding. :) Jan 11 at 8:13
  • 4
    Interestingly, rustc/LLVM is smart enough to reason about the % and the ranges and compile both formulations to the exact same (panic-free) assembly. Jan 11 at 8:20
9

I would use a simple if because you have one condition per case and only a small number of cases:

if millis < 200 {
    do_something()
} else if millis < 600 {
    do_something_else()
} else {
    do_something_altogether_different()
}

If you want to use match you could also use if-guards in it:

match millis {
    x if x < 200 => do_something(),
    x if x < 600 => do_something_else(),
    _ => do_something_altogether_different(),
}

Both remove the duplication of 199/200...

2

You can modify one of the arms so that the compiler understands it to include the case that cannot happen, by making one of the ranges unbounded. This could be considered the match version of the if chain option:

fn foo(time: u32) {
    let millis = time % 1000;
    match millis {
        0..=199 => todo!(),
        200..=599 => todo!(),
        600.. => todo!(),
    }
}

However, I would choose this option only in code that's as obviously-correct as this example; in more complex cases I'd prefer the version with an _ => unreachable!() since that will catch any bugs resulting in actually out-of-range values. (In fact, there's such a possible hidden situation in code very similar to this! If the input is a signed integer, time % 1000 might be negative, which is out of range. Though that'd make the above not compile for not covering those patterns.)

0

This is just an improvement on Kevin Reid's answer, which removes the duplication by reversing the order:

let millis: u64 = time % 1000;
match millis {
    600.. => todo!(),
    200.. => todo!(),
    0.. => todo!(),
}

We could also leave out one more number, but I'm undecided as to whether this is an improvement.

let millis: u64 = time % 1000;
match millis {
    600.. => todo!(),
    200.. => todo!(),
    _ => todo!(),
}

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