53

These two loops are supposed to be equivalent in C++ and Rust:

#include <cstdint>

std::uint64_t sum1(std::uint64_t n) {
    std::uint64_t sum = 0;
    for (std::uint64_t j = 0; j <= n; ++j) {
        sum += 1;
    }
    return sum;
}
pub fn sum1(num: u64) -> u64 {
    let mut sum: u64 = 0;
    for j in 0u64..=num {
        sum += 1;
    }
    return sum;
}

However the C++ version generates a very terse assembly:

sum1(unsigned long):                               # @sum1(unsigned long)
        xor     eax, eax
.LBB0_1:                                # =>This Inner Loop Header: Depth=1
        add     rax, 1
        cmp     rax, rdi
        jbe     .LBB0_1
        ret

while Rust's version is very long with two checks in the loop instead of one:

example::sum1:
        xor     eax, eax
        xor     ecx, ecx
.LBB0_1:
        mov     rdx, rcx
        cmp     rcx, rdi
        adc     rcx, 0
        add     rax, 1
        cmp     rdx, rdi
        jae     .LBB0_3
        cmp     rcx, rdi
        jbe     .LBB0_1
.LBB0_3:
        ret

Godbolt: https://godbolt.org/z/xYW94qxjK

What is Rust intrinsically trying to prevent that C++ is carefree about?

7
  • 2
    I think it's something about inclusive ranges... I don't know the details, but I saw it mentioned recently. Try seeing what happens if you change the Rust loop to for j in 0..num+1
    – Herohtar
    Jan 11, 2022 at 19:47
  • @Herohtar Well that optimizes to a closed formula and no loop. Same happens with C++ as well.
    – user8143588
    Jan 11, 2022 at 19:51
  • 2
    @Jellyboy There's core::intrinsics::assume, but it's perma-unstable. Jan 11, 2022 at 20:00
  • 3
    @Jellyboy On stable, you can do if num < 100 { unsafe { core::hint::unreachable_unchecked(); } }. Jan 11, 2022 at 20:07
  • 1
    FWIW, I have a crate I use for stating these kinds of assumptions succinctly, crates.io/crates/assume. E.g. assume!(unsafe: num < 100).
    – GManNickG
    Jan 13, 2022 at 21:57

3 Answers 3

45

Overflow in the iterator state.

The C++ version will loop forever when given a large enough input:

#include <cstdint>

std::uint64_t sum1(std::uint64_t n) {  
    std::uint64_t sum = 0;
    for (std::uint64_t j = 0; j <= n; ++j) {
        __asm__ ("");
        sum += 1;
    }
    return sum;
}

#include <iostream>

int main() {
    std::cout << sum1(UINT64_C(0xffffffff'ffffffff)) << std::endl;

    return 0;
}

This is because when the loop counter j finally reaches 0xffffffff'ffffffff, incrementing it wraps around to 0, which means the loop invariant j <= n is always fulfilled and the loop never exits.

Strictly speaking, invoking the original version of sum1 with 0xffffffff'ffffffff infamously triggers undefined behaviour, though not because of overflow alone, but since infinite loops without externally-visible side effects are UB ([intro.progress]/1). This is why in my version I added an empty __asm__ statement to the function to act as a dummy ‘side effect’ preventing the compiler from taking ‘advantage’ of that in optimisation passes.

The Rust version, on the other hand, is not only perfectly well-defined, but iterates exactly as many times as the cardinality of the range:

use std::num::Wrapping;

fn sum1(num: u64) -> u64 {
    let mut sum = Wrapping(0);
    for _ in 0..=num {
        sum += Wrapping(1);
    }
    return sum.0;
}

fn main() {
    println!("{}", sum1(0xffffffff_ffffffff));
}

The above program (slightly modified to avoid getting bogged down in debug versus release mode differences with respect to the summation) will terminate after exactly 18 446 744 073 709 551 616 iterations and print 0; the Rust version carefully maintains iterator state so that overflow does not happen in the iterator.

9
  • I used this version and it produces the same assembly as the one above in the question. godbolt.org/z/6xE49YMxd
    – user8143588
    Jan 11, 2022 at 20:15
  • 8
    That's intentional. user3840170's changes were made to get a debug build to "work" (your version would cause a panic due to an overflow in sum). Release builds have overflow checks disabled (integer arithmetic wraps on overflow), so the Wrapping wrapper doesn't change the behavior there. Jan 11, 2022 at 20:31
  • 6
    No, you're getting this backwards. You are getting a release build with -C opt-level=3. user3840170's changes are only important in a debug build (in which an overflow causes a panic, instead of just wrapping around; Wrapping replaces the panic with wrapping arithmetic). Your version has different behavior in debug vs. release mode when calling sum1(0xffffffff_ffffffff), while user3840170's version has the same behavior in both modes, but they both behave the same in release mode (indeed, they generate the same assembly code, as you pointed out). Jan 11, 2022 at 20:48
  • 1
    @MatthieuM. that look like a strange rule of c++ it's look arbitrary and unclear
    – Stargateur
    Jan 12, 2022 at 8:44
  • 2
    @MatthieuM. It was actually C++'s idea in the first place, developed as part of the addition of multithreading to C++11, and then bolted back into C11 with reservations -- compare C++11 [intro.multithread] paragraph 10 with the much weaker statement in C11 6.8.5p6. The previous versions of both standards (C++98, C99) don't contain any of this language. Anyway, the rationale appears to have been "allow compiler transformations such as removal of empty loops, even when termination cannot be proven" but I don't think that's an excuse for removal of loops that provably don't terminate.
    – zwol
    Jan 12, 2022 at 14:51
18

These two loops are equivalent in C++ and Rust

Your two code snippets don't share the same behavior. for (uint64_t j = 0; j <= n; ++j) doesn't handle n == uint64_t::MAX (make it infinite looping) while for j in 0u64..=num do (will never go into an infinite loop).

A rust equivalent code could be:

pub fn sum1(num: u64) -> u64 {
    let mut sum: u64 = 0;
    let mut j = 0;
    while j <= num {
        sum = sum.wrapping_add(1);
        j = j.wrapping_add(1);
    }
    sum
}

currently produce the following asm godbolt:

example::sum1:
        xor     eax, eax
.LBB0_1:
        add     rax, 1
        cmp     rax, rdi
        jbe     .LBB0_1
        ret
3
  • 1
    Elaborating a bit, this more direct translation does have the same output: rust.godbolt.org/z/GbToeKec7
    – GManNickG
    Jan 11, 2022 at 21:38
  • Shouldnt it be saturating_add() instead for sum?
    – user8143588
    Jan 12, 2022 at 0:24
  • @Jellyboy No, unsigned arithmetic in C++ is modulo 2^k (in this case, k==64). Saturating in C++ would look like: sum += sum == static_cast<unsigned>(-1) ? 0 : 1;.
    – GManNickG
    Jan 12, 2022 at 2:47
16

@user3840170 correctly identified the difference: overflow check in Rust, and not in C++.

Still, the question remains as to why there are 2 checks per loop in the Rust version instead of 1, and the answer to that is that LLVM is not sufficiently smart and/or the RangeInclusive design is not well adapted to LLVM1.

The optimal code generation for short loops, is to split the loop, transforming:

for j in 0u64..=num {
    sum += 1;
}

Into:

for j in 0u64..num { // equivalent to for (auto j = 0; j < num; ++j)
    sum += 1;
}

if 0 <= num {
    sum += 1;
}

This would lead to having a single branch in the main loop, and allow LLVM to switch this to a closed formula2.

The Loop Splitting optimization applies to RangeInclusive and most other Chain iterators, as indeed a RangeInclusive can be thought of as a chain of a once iterator and half-exclusive range iterator (in either order). It is not always a win: like inlining, it implies duplicating the code of the loop body, which if large may lead to a significant overhead in code size.

Unfortunately, LLVM fails to split the loop. I am not sure if it's because the optimization is missing altogether, or it just fails to apply it here for some reason. I'm looking forward to the rustc_codegen_gcc backend, as GCC 7 added Loop Splitting to GCC, and it may be able to generate better code there.


1 See this comment I left over performance issues with RangeInclusive. I spent significant time banging my head over the issue in 2019, and I dearly wish RangeInclusive (and all ranges) were NOT Iterator; it's a costly mistake.

2 Chain iterators, in general, perform much better using .for_each(...), specifically because there the loop is (manually) split. See the playground for (0..=num).for_each(|_| sum += 1) being reduced to num + 1.

9
  • AND I realize now if you split that loop, not only it gets optimized as per number of checks, the loop will get eliminated completely too, returning N+1.
    – user8143588
    Jan 12, 2022 at 12:20
  • the code of rangeinclusif is so complex I still don't understand why they did like this, doc.rust-lang.org/src/core/iter/range.rs.html#913 call is empty but still do manual check, and code is unnecessary complex call next_spec and duplicate code everywhere and is_empty a critical function check is_exhausted first when 99.9% of case it's should just check the value. doc.rust-lang.org/src/core/ops/range.rs.html#539 I'm not at all surprise that LLVM can't optimize even this simple loop.
    – Stargateur
    Jan 12, 2022 at 18:00
  • also I disagree about overflow check, it's not obligatory a range can be that anything you could use the Generic to do a lot of range and not would make sense to call this behavior a "overflow check" I also do not understand why you said it shouldn't be a iterator
    – Stargateur
    Jan 12, 2022 at 18:04
  • What is if 0 <= num supposed to do? num being an unsigned type, this always evaluates to true?
    – Will
    Jan 12, 2022 at 23:27
  • 1
    @PeterCordes: While this works in this particular implementation, it doesn't in general as the start and end bounds can be "crossed": that is 3..=2 should iterate 0 times. (And with a general type, there's the issue that not all types support wrapping adds) Jan 13, 2022 at 10:14

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