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I am using a functional programming style to solve the Leetcode easy question, Count the Number of Consistent Strings. The premise of this question is simple: count the amount of values for which the predicate of "all values are in another set" holds.

I have two approaches, one which I am fairly certain behaves as I want it to, and the other which I am less sure about. Both produce the correct output, but ideally they would stop evaluating other elements after the output is in a final state.


    public int countConsistentStrings(String allowed, String[] words) {
        final Set<Character> set = allowed.chars()
          .mapToObj(c -> (char)c)
          .collect(Collectors.toCollection(HashSet::new));
        return (int)Arrays.stream(words)
          .filter(word ->
                  word.chars()
                  .allMatch(c -> set.contains((char)c))
                 )
          .count();
    }

In this solution, to the best of my knowledge, the allMatch statement will terminate and evaluate to false at the first instance of c for which the predicate does not hold true, skipping the other values in that stream.


    public int countConsistentStrings(String allowed, String[] words) {
        Set<Character> set = allowed.chars()
          .mapToObj(c -> (char)c)
          .collect(Collectors.toCollection(HashSet::new));
        return (int)Arrays.stream(words)
          .filter(word ->
                  word.chars()
                  .mapToObj(c -> set.contains((char)c))
                  .reduce((a,b) -> a&&b)
                  .orElse(false)
                 )
          .count();
    }

In this solution, the same logic is used but instead of allMatch, I use map and then reduce. Logically, after a single false value comes from the map stage, reduce will always evaluate to false. I know Java streams are lazy, but I am unsure when they ''know'' just how lazy they can be. Will this be less efficient than using allMatch or will laziness ensure the same operation?


Lastly, in this code, we can see that the value for x will always be 0 as after filtering for only positive numbers, the sum of them will always be positive (assume no overflow) so taking the minimum of positive numbers and a hardcoded 0 will be 0. Will the stream be lazy enough to evaluate this to 0 always, or will it work to reduce every element after the filter anyways?

List<Integer> list = new ArrayList<>();
...
/*Some values added to list*/
...
int x = list.stream()
        .filter(i -> i >= 0)
        .reduce((a,b) -> Math.min(a+b, 0))
        .orElse(0);

To summarize the above, how does one know when the Java stream will be lazy? There are lazy opportunities that I see in the code, but how can I guarantee that my code will be as lazy as possible?

7
  • 6
    reduce doesn’t know what function you’re reducing - it’s an arbitrary “chunk of code”. It definitely doesn’t know what the value you pass as the default to Optional. So no, the second approach is not lazy. Jan 11, 2022 at 21:48
  • Adding that I don't think this has got anything to do with "laziness". You can have a language which lazily evaluates its expressions but still needs to fully evaluate it. reduce reduces to a a single value and for that it needs to inspect all values (what Boris the Spider already commented). Furthermore, reduce is a terminal operation and as such consumes the stream, which is quite the opposite of lazy. filter, map and any other intermediate operation are lazy: they are only evaluated when the first terminal operation is called.
    – knittl
    Jan 11, 2022 at 22:01
  • To give it a different spin: if Java were able to lazily evaluate reduce, the function passed to reduce contains &&, Math.min, or + which are evaluated eagerly. As such, Java cannot ignore part of those function calls.
    – knittl
    Jan 11, 2022 at 22:08
  • 1
    @knittl “consumes the stream” does not imply “processes all elements”. The already mentioned allMatch is also a terminal operation but still lazy and short-circuiting.
    – Holger
    Jan 12, 2022 at 9:09
  • 1
    @knittl exactly, the OP used the wrong term. The difference between allMatch and reduce is not the laziness but that the former is short-circuiting. That difference is what the question is about.
    – Holger
    Jan 12, 2022 at 9:31

1 Answer 1

5

The actual term you’re asking for is short-circuiting

Further, some operations are deemed short-circuiting operations. An intermediate operation is short-circuiting if, when presented with infinite input, it may produce a finite stream as a result. A terminal operation is short-circuiting if, when presented with infinite input, it may terminate in finite time. Having a short-circuiting operation in the pipeline is a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for the processing of an infinite stream to terminate normally in finite time.

The term “lazy” only applies to intermediate operations and means that they only perform work when being requested by the terminal operation. This is always the case, so when you don’t chain a terminal operation, no intermediate operation will ever process any element.

Finding out whether a terminal operation is short-circuiting, is rather easy. Go to the Stream API documentation and check whether the particular terminal operation’s documentation contains the sentence

This is a short-circuiting terminal operation.

allMatch has it, reduce has not.

This does not mean that such optimizations based on logic or algebra are impossible. But the responsibility lies at the JVM’s optimizer which might do the same for loops. However, this requires inlining of all involved methods to be sure that this conditions always applies and there are no side effect which must be retained. This behavioral compatibility implies that even if the processing gets optimized away, a peek(System.out::println) would keep printing all elements as if they were processed. In practice, you should not expect such optimizations, as the Stream implementation code is too complex for the optimizer.

2
  • Where I am confused with laziness is that if the reduce stage knows that is doesn't need to look at any more inputs from the map stage, the rest of the map stage would not need to be computed. (i.e. The short circuit in the reduce means all of map doesn't need to be computed if the short circuit happens). It seems from other responses here that the reduce stage can't do this.
    – AaronC
    Jan 12, 2022 at 18:48
  • 3
    That's precisely what I wrote in the answer. reduce is not a short-circuiting operation and the documentation tells you that.
    – Holger
    Jan 12, 2022 at 18:59

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