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I need to add a new column to the table with not null and default date time. But I get the error as below. I have checked multiple instances but the error occurs.

DECLARE @SQL NVARCHAR(1000), @date NVARCHAR(1000);
SET @date = '9999-12-31 00:00:00.000'

SET @SQL = 'ALTER TABLE [spi].[ProductClass]
                ADD lastUpdatedTime datetime NOT NULL
                    CONSTRAINT default_updateTime DEFAULT @date';

EXEC sp_executesql @SQL;

This is the error I get.

Must declare the scalar variable "@date".

Any solution?

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    sp_executesql's parameters does not works as variable substitution the way you use it. You will need to replace @date with that string literal when forming the dynamic alter table query
    – Squirrel
    Commented Jan 12, 2022 at 8:37
  • 1
    What's the point of this dynamic SQL statement? The default value is a pretty specific default that's unlikely to change between tables. It's also unexpected - the default update time is typically GETDATE() so it matches the insertion time. After that, update columns are updated using triggers Commented Jan 12, 2022 at 8:44
  • A useful improvement would be to change the obsolete datetime to datetime2(0) if you only want second precision, or something else if you want better precision. datetime has many quirks and one of them is that it's only accurate to around 0.003 seconds. The docs strongly warn against using datetime. If you really need milliseconds you'd need to use datetime2(3) Commented Jan 12, 2022 at 8:49

2 Answers 2

5

If you replace @date with the value, it'll work.

But let's look at why it isn't working. Your SQL:

DECLARE @SQL NVARCHAR(1000), @date NVARCHAR(1000);
SET @date = '9999-12-31 00:00:00.000'

SET @SQL = 'ALTER TABLE [spi].[ProductClass]
                ADD lastUpdatedTime datetime NOT NULL
                    CONSTRAINT default_updateTime DEFAULT @date';

EXEC sp_executesql @SQL;

Declares a couple of variables and executes a block of SQL that one of the variables represents. Your issue is that sp_executesql reads some text as SQL and tries to run it - if you can't run what you tell it to run, then it can't.

So if you were to crack open a new query window and attempt to run:

ALTER TABLE [spi].[ProductClass]
    ADD lastUpdatedTime datetime NOT NULL
        CONSTRAINT default_updateTime DEFAULT @date

It'd have a meltdown trying to figure out what @date is supposed to be.

DECLARE @date NVARCHAR(1000);

SET @date = '9999-12-31 00:00:00.000';

ALTER TABLE [spi].[ProductClass]
    ADD lastUpdatedTime datetime NOT NULL
        CONSTRAINT default_updateTime DEFAULT @date;

Would work, or simply:

ALTER TABLE [spi].[ProductClass]
    ADD lastUpdatedTime datetime NOT NULL
        CONSTRAINT default_updateTime DEFAULT '9999-12-31 00:00:00.000';

So, using concatenation you can do:

DECLARE @SQL NVARCHAR(1000), @date NVARCHAR(1000);
SET @date = '9999-12-31 00:00:00.000'
    
SET @SQL = 'ALTER TABLE [spi].[ProductClass]
                ADD lastUpdatedTime datetime NOT NULL
                    CONSTRAINT default_updateTime DEFAULT ' + @date;

EXEC sp_executesql @SQL;    

Which will get you a different error, so try including a pair of quotes in the date variable:

DECLARE @SQL NVARCHAR(1000), @date NVARCHAR(1000);
SET @date = '''9999-12-31 00:00:00.000'''
    
SET @SQL = 'ALTER TABLE [spi].[ProductClass]
                ADD lastUpdatedTime datetime NOT NULL
                    CONSTRAINT default_updateTime DEFAULT ' + @date;

EXEC sp_executesql @SQL;    
2

What you are looking for is like below where you create a dynamic SQL via concatenation

DECLARE @SQL NVARCHAR(1000), @date NVARCHAR(1000);
SET @date = '9999-12-31 00:00:00.000'

SET @SQL = 'ALTER TABLE [spi].[ProductClass]
                ADD lastUpdatedTime datetime NOT NULL
                    CONSTRAINT default_updateTime DEFAULT '''+ @date+'''';

EXEC sp_executesql @SQL;
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