732

I am trying to support CORS in my Node.js application that uses the Express.js web framework. I have read a Google group discussion about how to handle this, and read a few articles about how CORS works. First, I did this (code is written in CoffeeScript syntax):

app.options "*", (req, res) ->
  res.header 'Access-Control-Allow-Origin', '*'
  res.header 'Access-Control-Allow-Credentials', true
  # try: 'POST, GET, PUT, DELETE, OPTIONS'
  res.header 'Access-Control-Allow-Methods', 'GET, OPTIONS'
  # try: 'X-Requested-With, X-HTTP-Method-Override, Content-Type, Accept'
  res.header 'Access-Control-Allow-Headers', 'Content-Type'
  # ...

It doesn't seem to work. It seems like my browser (Chrome) is not sending the initial OPTIONS request. When I just updated the block for the resource I need to submit a cross-origin GET request to:

app.get "/somethingelse", (req, res) ->
  # ...
  res.header 'Access-Control-Allow-Origin', '*'
  res.header 'Access-Control-Allow-Credentials', true
  res.header 'Access-Control-Allow-Methods', 'POST, GET, PUT, DELETE, OPTIONS'
  res.header 'Access-Control-Allow-Headers', 'Content-Type'
  # ...

It works (in Chrome). This also works in Safari.

I have read that...

In a browser implementing CORS, each cross-origin GET or POST request is preceded by an OPTIONS request that checks whether the GET or POST is OK.

So my main question is, how come this doesn't seem to happen in my case? Why isn't my app.options block called? Why do I need to set the headers in my main app.get block?

3

36 Answers 36

705

I found the easiest way is to use the node.js package cors. The simplest usage is:

var cors = require('cors')

var app = express()
app.use(cors())

There are, of course many ways to configure the behaviour to your needs; the page linked above shows a number of examples.

10
  • 1
    It fails for me when I use it with credentials. :( Everything else worked like a charm.. But its of no use to me if it fails withCredentials set to true Jun 27, 2014 at 22:15
  • Its working fine for ajax request. I want CORS implementation for Script Tags and iFrame because in these requests the Origin is not present in the request header :( How to implement this ?
    – akashPatra
    Aug 20, 2014 at 7:50
  • 91
    You need to also set cors({credentials: true, origin: true})
    – nlawson
    Nov 4, 2014 at 15:49
  • 4
    how do you enable options preflight here?
    – chovy
    Dec 19, 2018 at 6:55
  • 1
    @nlawson Never, ever use cors({credentials: true, origin: true})! It amounts to voiding the same-origin policy. Very insecure.
    – jub0bs
    Nov 23, 2021 at 11:03
460

Try passing control to the next matching route. If Express is matching app.get route first, then it won't continue onto the options route unless you do this (note use of next):

app.get('somethingelse', function(req, res, next) {
    //..set headers etc.

    next();
});

In terms of organising the CORS stuff, I put it in a middleware which is working well for me:

//CORS middleware
var allowCrossDomain = function(req, res, next) {
    res.header('Access-Control-Allow-Origin', 'example.com');
    res.header('Access-Control-Allow-Methods', 'GET,PUT,POST,DELETE');
    res.header('Access-Control-Allow-Headers', 'Content-Type');

    next();
}

//...
app.configure(function() {
    app.use(express.bodyParser());
    app.use(express.cookieParser());
    app.use(express.session({ secret: 'cool beans' }));
    app.use(express.methodOverride());
    app.use(allowCrossDomain);
    app.use(app.router);
    app.use(express.static(__dirname + '/public'));
});
16
  • 1
    I believe OPTIONS happens before a GET, whereas if you're doing a POST - there is no OPTIONS request...
    – Nick
    Sep 13, 2011 at 15:14
  • 22
    Is config.allowedDomains a comma-delimited string or an array?
    – pixelfreak
    Nov 17, 2012 at 2:56
  • 2
    config.allowedDomains should be a space separated array
    – mcfedr
    Mar 20, 2013 at 8:10
  • 1
    The extra session was removed by simply rearranging the express middleware order. On another note, this needs a little more security. if the origin is not in the allowed domain then the request is still processed, only the browser won't be able to see it plus the origin can be spoofed. My advice would be to do a check and if the origin is not in the allowed list then return 403 immediately. Also is any sensitive information is being served, validate the user via a session.
    – Xerri
    Sep 19, 2013 at 10:52
  • 1
    @mcfedr Could you please explain what do you mean by space separated array?
    – tkit
    Mar 26, 2014 at 20:27
214

To answer your main question, the CORS spec only requires the OPTIONS call to precede the POST or GET if the POST or GET has any non-simple content or headers in it.

Content-Types that require a CORS pre-flight request (the OPTIONS call) are any Content-Type except the following:

  1. application/x-www-form-urlencoded
  2. multipart/form-data
  3. text/plain

Any other Content-Types apart from those listed above will trigger a pre-flight request.

As for Headers, any Request Headers apart from the following will trigger a pre-flight request:

  1. Accept
  2. Accept-Language
  3. Content-Language
  4. Content-Type
  5. DPR
  6. Save-Data
  7. Viewport-Width
  8. Width

Any other Request Headers will trigger the pre-flight request.

So, you could add a custom header such as: x-Trigger: CORS, and that should trigger the pre-flight request and hit the OPTIONS block.

See MDN Web API Reference - CORS Preflighted requests

4
  • 33
    Can you provide an example? Apr 29, 2018 at 17:53
  • 3
    The page I linked to seems to have a number of examples. Could you tell me what example you think is missing? Apr 30, 2018 at 19:26
  • 9
    In general though, link-only answers are fragile because they could, at any moment, be broken. That said, this answer seems good enough in that it's highlighting the general conditions under which OPTIONS blocks don't send. Would be nice if it had the list of accepted HEADERS, or which content-types require OPTIONS, etc but it's a good start
    – dwanderson
    Jun 19, 2018 at 1:38
  • Great answer thank you, but adding a custom x-Trigger header only to trigger the pre-flight sounds odd to me, is that suggested only for "educational" purposes here or it's something actually useful?
    – aderchox
    Apr 25 at 8:53
129

To stay in the same idea of routing. I use this code :

app.all('/*', function(req, res, next) {
  res.header("Access-Control-Allow-Origin", "*");
  res.header("Access-Control-Allow-Headers", "X-Requested-With");
  next();
});

Similar to http://enable-cors.org/server_expressjs.html example

4
  • 1
    This goes in the grunt.js file? Jan 2, 2015 at 2:13
  • 6
    What about preflight?
    – backdesk
    Feb 4, 2015 at 13:01
  • No @OliverDixon, this is on the server side Jul 4, 2019 at 22:17
  • 2
    the best solution and without any packages. thanks! Mar 5, 2021 at 9:15
97

do

npm install cors --save

and just add these lines in your main file where your request going (keep it before any route).

const cors = require('cors');
const express = require('express');
let app = express();
app.use(cors());
app.options('*', cors());
1
  • 3
    app.options('*', cors()) // include before other routes
    – Rajeshwar
    Nov 12, 2018 at 10:47
59

I have made a more complete middleware suitable for express or connect. It supports OPTIONS requests for preflight checking. Note that it will allow CORS access to anything, you might want to put in some checks if you want to limit access.

app.use(function(req, res, next) {
    var oneof = false;
    if(req.headers.origin) {
        res.header('Access-Control-Allow-Origin', req.headers.origin);
        oneof = true;
    }
    if(req.headers['access-control-request-method']) {
        res.header('Access-Control-Allow-Methods', req.headers['access-control-request-method']);
        oneof = true;
    }
    if(req.headers['access-control-request-headers']) {
        res.header('Access-Control-Allow-Headers', req.headers['access-control-request-headers']);
        oneof = true;
    }
    if(oneof) {
        res.header('Access-Control-Max-Age', 60 * 60 * 24 * 365);
    }

    // intercept OPTIONS method
    if (oneof && req.method == 'OPTIONS') {
        res.send(200);
    }
    else {
        next();
    }
});
8
  • Hey there, I came across your solution and was wondering if the 'oneof' flag should be set false if one of the headers wasn't detected?
    – Leonidas
    Mar 19, 2013 at 21:14
  • 1
    Some requests will not have all the headers. Specifically a GET request will be sent by the browser, and when it doesn't get a correct allow-origin response an error is given to js. Whereas for a POST request, the OPTIONS request is first sent, with the allow-method header, and only afterwards, the actual POST request will be sent.
    – mcfedr
    Mar 20, 2013 at 8:06
  • 1
    Ah, I see. Thanks. Did you ever run into trouble by not putting res.send(200) in there if the req method was 'options'?
    – Leonidas
    Mar 20, 2013 at 14:24
  • I dont think i have tried sending something else, I would imagine any other response will cause the browser to refuse the request that it is preflighting.
    – mcfedr
    Mar 20, 2013 at 15:19
  • 1
    I don't know how to thank you. Thanks a Lot, pal🤩 Feb 13, 2021 at 15:31
42

Do something like this:

app.use(function(req, res, next) {
    res.header("Access-Control-Allow-Origin", "*");
    res.header("Access-Control-Allow-Headers", "Origin, X-Requested-With, Content-Type, Accept");
    next();
});
0
39

install cors module of expressjs. you can follow these steps >

Installation

npm install cors

Simple Usage (Enable All CORS Requests)

var express = require('express');
var cors = require('cors');
var app = express();
app.use(cors());

for more details go to https://github.com/expressjs/cors

2
  • 2
    TypeError: Cannot read property 'headers' of undefined The most basic app setup. Dec 3, 2017 at 19:51
  • 1
    Are you sure you have request object ? :)
    – codebased
    Apr 12, 2018 at 23:25
22

Testing done with express + node + ionic running in differente ports.

Localhost:8100

Localhost:5000

// CORS (Cross-Origin Resource Sharing) headers to support Cross-site HTTP requests

app.all('*', function(req, res, next) {
       res.header("Access-Control-Allow-Origin", "*");
       res.header("Access-Control-Allow-Headers", "X-Requested-With");
       res.header('Access-Control-Allow-Headers', 'Content-Type');
       next();
});
1
  • 4
    In which file do we need to add this lines? Dec 15, 2016 at 10:24
21

first simply install cors in your project. Take terminal(command prompt) and cd to your project directory and run the below command:

npm install cors --save

Then take the server.js file and change the code to add the following in it:

var cors = require('cors');


var app = express();

app.use(cors());

app.use(function(req, res, next) {
   res.header("Access-Control-Allow-Origin", "*");
   res.header('Access-Control-Allow-Methods', 'DELETE, PUT, GET, POST');
   res.header("Access-Control-Allow-Headers", "Origin, X-Requested-With, Content-Type, Accept");
   next();
});

This worked for me..

3
  • 8
    You don't need cors if you're doing the res.header stuff. cors is a library that handles all that for you. Delete your first & 3rd lines (AKA everything with cors) and you'll find that it still works.
    – thisissami
    Sep 7, 2017 at 19:25
  • heck i'm pretty sure all you really need is this line res.header("Access-Control-Allow-Origin", "*");
    – thisissami
    Sep 7, 2017 at 19:26
  • though do keep in mind that you're compromising your security by doing that. :)
    – thisissami
    Sep 7, 2017 at 19:27
12

Some time ago, I faced this problem so I did this to allow CORS in my nodejs app:

First you need to install cors by using below command :

npm install cors --save

Now add the following code to your app starting file like ( app.js or server.js)

var express = require('express');
var app = express();

var cors = require('cors');
var bodyParser = require('body-parser');

//enables cors
app.use(cors({
  'allowedHeaders': ['sessionId', 'Content-Type'],
  'exposedHeaders': ['sessionId'],
  'origin': '*',
  'methods': 'GET,HEAD,PUT,PATCH,POST,DELETE',
  'preflightContinue': false
}));

require('./router/index')(app);
1
  • tried this after installing cors. Cors is not a function Jul 6, 2018 at 13:27
10

This works for me, as its an easy implementation inside the routes, im using meanjs and its working fine, safari, chrome, etc.

app.route('/footer-contact-form').post(emailer.sendFooterMail).options(function(req,res,next){ 
        res.header('Access-Control-Allow-Origin', '*'); 
        res.header('Access-Control-Allow-Methods', 'GET, POST');
        res.header('Access-Control-Allow-Headers', 'Origin, X-Requested-With, Content-Type, Accept');
        return res.send(200);

    });
0
8

If you want to make it controller specific, you can use:

res.setHeader("X-Frame-Options", "ALLOWALL");
res.setHeader("Access-Control-Allow-Origin", "*");
res.setHeader("Access-Control-Allow-Methods", "POST, GET");
res.setHeader("Access-Control-Allow-Headers", "Origin, X-Requested-With, Content-Type, Accept");

Please note that this will also allow iframes.

7

In my index.js I added:

app.use((req, res, next) => {
   res.header("Access-Control-Allow-Origin", "*");
   res.header("Access-Control-Allow-Headers", "Origin, X-Requested-With, Content-Type, Accept");
   res.header("Access-Control-Allow-Methods", "GET, POST, PUT, DELETE, OPTIONS");
   next();
}) 
1
  • 2
    I should comment that Access-Control-Allow-Origin = * means that you won't be able to send Cookies to the server, they will be rejected by the CORS Policy - source : developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/HTTP/… . So, dont use this if you want to use cookies.
    – Eksapsy
    Aug 19, 2019 at 13:59
6

Can refer the code below for the same. Source: Academind/node-restful-api

const express = require('express');
const app = express();

//acts as a middleware
//to handle CORS Errors
app.use((req, res, next) => { //doesn't send response just adjusts it
    res.header("Access-Control-Allow-Origin", "*") //* to give access to any origin
    res.header(
        "Access-Control-Allow-Headers",
        "Origin, X-Requested-With, Content-Type, Accept, Authorization" //to give access to all the headers provided
    );
    if(req.method === 'OPTIONS'){
        res.header('Access-Control-Allow-Methods', 'PUT, POST, PATCH, DELETE, GET'); //to give access to all the methods provided
        return res.status(200).json({});
    }
    next(); //so that other routes can take over
})
1
  • I saw many answer and this have something which is importan, I tried to use this part of the code after some other configurations and it didn't work and for some reason, I tried putting the code after app const app = express(); and works! I think is important to mention it.
    – rfcabal
    Jan 13, 2019 at 0:45
6

The easiest answer is to just use the cors package.

const cors = require('cors');

const app = require('express')();
app.use(cors());

That will enable CORS across the board. If you want to learn how to enable CORS without outside modules, all you really need is some Express middleware that sets the 'Access-Control-Allow-Origin' header. That's the minimum you need to allow cross-request domains from a browser to your server.

app.options('*', (req, res) => {
  res.set('Access-Control-Allow-Origin', '*');
  res.send('ok');
});

app.use((req, res) => {
  res.set('Access-Control-Allow-Origin', '*');
});
6

cors package is recommended way to for solving the CORS policy issue in express.js, but you also need to make sure to enable it for app.options as well, like below:

const cors = require('cors');

// enable cors
app.use(
  cors({
    origin: true,
    optionsSuccessStatus: 200,
    credentials: true,
  })
);
app.options(
  '*',
  cors({
    origin: true,
    optionsSuccessStatus: 200,
    credentials: true,
  })
);
4

My simplest solution with Express 4.2.0 (EDIT: Doesn't seem to work in 4.3.0) was:

function supportCrossOriginScript(req, res, next) {
    res.status(200);
    res.header("Access-Control-Allow-Origin", "*");
    res.header("Access-Control-Allow-Headers", "Content-Type");

    // res.header("Access-Control-Allow-Headers", "Origin");
    // res.header("Access-Control-Allow-Headers", "Origin, X-Requested-With, Content-Type, Accept");
    // res.header("Access-Control-Allow-Methods","POST, OPTIONS");
    // res.header("Access-Control-Allow-Methods","POST, GET, OPTIONS, DELETE, PUT, HEAD");
    // res.header("Access-Control-Max-Age","1728000");
    next();
}

// Support CORS
app.options('/result', supportCrossOriginScript);

app.post('/result', supportCrossOriginScript, function(req, res) {
    res.send('received');
    // do stuff with req
});

I suppose doing app.all('/result', ...) would work too...

4

Below worked for me, hope it helps someone!

const express = require('express');
const cors = require('cors');
let app = express();

app.use(cors({ origin: true }));

Got reference from https://expressjs.com/en/resources/middleware/cors.html#configuring-cors

2
  • What file does that go in? peanutbutter.js? Mar 18, 2019 at 18:12
  • not sure about peanutbutter.js, for me it is express.js. basically, it should be the file where you require your express app, initialize it, and require route files. Mar 19, 2019 at 5:02
3

Try this in your main js file:

app.use((req, res, next) => {
res.header("Access-Control-Allow-Origin", "*");
res.header(
  "Access-Control-Allow-Headers",
  "Authorization, X-API-KEY, Origin, X-Requested-With, Content-Type, Accept, Access-Control-Allow-Request-Method"
);
res.header("Access-Control-Allow-Methods", "GET, POST, OPTIONS, PUT, DELETE");
res.header("Allow", "GET, POST, OPTIONS, PUT, DELETE");
next();
});

This should solve your problem

2

In typescript, if you want to use the node.js package cors

/**
* app.ts
* If you use the cors library
*/

import * as express from "express";
[...]
import * as cors from 'cors';

class App {
   public express: express.Application;

   constructor() {
       this.express = express();
       [..]
       this.handleCORSErrors();
   }

   private handleCORSErrors(): any {
       const corsOptions: cors.CorsOptions = {
           origin: 'http://example.com',
           optionsSuccessStatus: 200
       };
       this.express.use(cors(corsOptions));
   }
}

export default new App().express;

If you don't want to use third part libraries for cors error handling, you need to change the handleCORSErrors() method.

/**
* app.ts
* If you do not use the cors library
*/

import * as express from "express";
[...]

class App {
   public express: express.Application;

   constructor() {
       this.express = express();
       [..]
       this.handleCORSErrors();
   }

   private handleCORSErrors(): any {
       this.express.use((req, res, next) => {
           res.header("Access-Control-Allow-Origin", "*");
           res.header(
               "Access-Control-ALlow-Headers",
               "Origin, X-Requested-With, Content-Type, Accept, Authorization"
           );
           if (req.method === "OPTIONS") {
               res.header(
                   "Access-Control-Allow-Methods",
                   "PUT, POST, PATCH, GET, DELETE"
               );
               return res.status(200).json({});
           } 
           next(); // send the request to the next middleware
       });
    }
}

export default new App().express;

For using the app.ts file

/**
* server.ts
*/
import * as http from "http";
import app from "./app";

const server: http.Server = http.createServer(app);

const PORT: any = process.env.PORT || 3000;
server.listen(PORT);
2
  • 1
    "If the server is written in typescript" — It isn't. The question says it is written in CoffeeScript.
    – Quentin
    Jul 9, 2018 at 9:44
  • 3
    @Quentin I just wanted to show an alternative in typesript, hoping that this could help somebody.
    – overcomer
    Jul 9, 2018 at 9:49
2

Using Express Middleware works great for me. If you are already using Express, just add the following middleware rules. It should start working.

app.all("/api/*", function(req, res, next) {
  res.header("Access-Control-Allow-Origin", "*");
  res.header("Access-Control-Allow-Headers", "Cache-Control, Pragma, Origin, Authorization, Content-Type, X-Requested-With");
  res.header("Access-Control-Allow-Methods", "GET, PUT, POST");
  return next();
});

app.all("/api/*", function(req, res, next) {
  if (req.method.toLowerCase() !== "options") {
    return next();
  }
  return res.send(204);
});

Reference

2

using CORS package. and put this parameters:

cors({credentials: true, origin: true, exposedHeaders: '*'})
1
  • 1
    The exact answer I was looking to allow my auth-token header to be visible in response header May 24, 2021 at 19:45
1

I found it to be extremely easy to do this with the npm request package (https://www.npmjs.com/package/request)

Then I based my solution on this post http://blog.javascripting.com/2015/01/17/dont-hassle-with-cors/

'use strict'

const express = require('express');
const request = require('request');

let proxyConfig = {
    url : {
        base: 'http://servertoreach.com?id=',
    }
}

/* setting up and configuring node express server for the application */
let server = express();
server.set('port', 3000);


/* methods forwarded to the servertoreach proxy  */
server.use('/somethingElse', function(req, res)
{
    let url = proxyConfig.url.base + req.query.id;
    req.pipe(request(url)).pipe(res);
});


/* start the server */
server.listen(server.get('port'), function() {
    console.log('express server with a proxy listening on port ' + server.get('port'));
});
1

This is similiar to Pat's answer with the difference that I finish with res.sendStatus(200); instead of next();

The code will catch all the requests of the method type OPTIONS and send back access-control-headers.

app.options('/*', (req, res, next) => {
    res.header('Access-Control-Allow-Origin', '*');
    res.header('Access-Control-Allow-Methods', 'GET,PUT,POST,DELETE,OPTIONS');
    res.header('Access-Control-Allow-Headers', 'Content-Type, Authorization, Content-Length, X-Requested-With');
    res.sendStatus(200);
});

The code accepts CORS from all origins as requested in the question. However, it would be better to replace the * with a specific origin i.e. http://localhost:8080 to prevent misuse.

Since we use the app.options-method instead of the app.use-method we don't need to make this check:

req.method === 'OPTIONS'

which we can see in some of the other answers.

I found the answer here: http://johnzhang.io/options-request-in-express.

1

The simplest approach is install the cors module in your project using:

npm i --save cors

Then in your server file import it using the following:

import cors from 'cors';

Then simply use it as a middleware like this:

app.use(cors());

Hope this helps!

0
1

You can use Express middleware, block your domain and methods.

app.use(function(req, res, next) {
  res.header("Access-Control-Allow-Origin", process.env.DOMAIN); // update to match the domain you will make the request from
  res.header("Access-Control-Allow-Methods", "GET,PUT,POST,DELETE");
  res.header(
    "Access-Control-Allow-Headers",
    "Origin, X-Requested-With, Content-Type, Accept"
  );
  next();
});
0
1

simple is hard:

 let my_data = []
const promise = new Promise(async function (resolve, reject) {
    axios.post('https://cors-anywhere.herokuapp.com/https://maps.googleapis.com/maps/api/directions/json?origin=33.69057660000001,72.9782724&destination=33.691478,%2072.978594&key=AIzaSyApzbs5QDJOnEObdSBN_Cmln5ZWxx323vA'
        , { 'Origin': 'https://localhost:3000' })
        .then(function (response) {
            console.log(`axios response ${response.data}`)
            const my_data = response.data
            resolve(my_data)
        })
        .catch(function (error) {
            console.log(error)
            alert('connection error')
        })
})
promise.then(data => {
    console.log(JSON.stringify(data))
})
1

If you want to get CORS working without the cors NPM package (for the pure joy of learning!), you can definitely handle OPTIONS calls yourself. Here's what worked for me:

app.options('*', (req, res) => {
    res.writeHead(200, '', {
        'Access-Control-Allow-Origin': '*',
        'Access-Control-Allow-Methods': 'OPTIONS',
    }).end();
});

Nice and simple, right? Notice the use of res.writeHead() instead of res.header(), which I am unfamiliar with.

0
1

If your Express Server has Authorization enabled, you can achieve that like this

const express = require('express');
const app=express();
const cors=require("cors");
app.use(cors({
   credentials: true, // for authorization
}));
...

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