10

If I have a generic type parameter that is a value type and I want to know if a value is equal to the default I test it like this:

static bool IsDefault<T>(T value){
    where T: struct
    return value.Equals(default(T));
}

If I don't have a generic type parameter, then it seems like I would have to use reflection. If the method has to work for all value types, then Is there a better way to perform this test than what I am doing here? :

static bool IsDefault(object value){
   if(!(value is ValueType)){
      throw new ArgumentException("Precondition failed: Must be a ValueType", "value");
   }
   var @default = Activator.CreateInstance(value.GetType());
   return value.Equals(@default);  
}

On a side note, Is there anything I am not considering here with respect to evaluating Nullable structs?

3
  • 1
    Looks okay to me. Good thing that the value is ValueType test will also check for null. :)
    – cdhowie
    Aug 15, 2011 at 17:04
  • Two questions: 1. why not use the generic method? 2. Why not make the parameter to second method a ValueType since you're just going to complain anyway?
    – dlev
    Aug 15, 2011 at 17:11
  • 2
    Or do if (!(value is ValueType)) return value == null;
    – cdhowie
    Aug 15, 2011 at 17:15

4 Answers 4

8

I have found the following extension methods useful and will work for all types:

public static object GetDefault(this Type t)
{
    return t.IsValueType ? Activator.CreateInstance(t) : null;
}

public static T GetDefault<T>()
{
    var t = typeof(T);
    return (T) GetDefault(t);
}

public static bool IsDefault<T>(T other)
{
    T defaultValue = GetDefault<T>();
    if (other == null) return defaultValue == null;
    return other.Equals(defaultValue);
}
2
  • 1
    this doesn't appear to work in a pure reflection scenario where you don't know the type of either, the one coming in is an object. So the T in IsDefault is just object, and .Equals just checks for reference equality. At least in my case boxed 0 was not equal to Activator.CreateInstance(property.PropertyType) where propertyType is int
    – Maslow
    Feb 12, 2013 at 20:23
  • I've been trying your solution and I've found even shorter (I believe that it should work all right too): public static object GetDefault<T>(T obj) { return default(T); } Aug 28, 2013 at 7:08
5

Old question but the accepted answer doesn't work for me so I submit this (probably can be made better):

public static object GetDefault(this Type type)
{   
    if (type.IsGenericType && type.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(Nullable<>))
    {
        var valueProperty = type.GetProperty("Value");
        type = valueProperty.PropertyType;
    }

    return type.IsValueType ? Activator.CreateInstance(type) : null;
}

With the following results:

typeof(int).GetDefault();       // returns 0
typeof(int?).GetDefault();      // returns 0
typeof(DateTime).GetDefault();  // returns 01/01/0001 00:00:00
typeof(DateTime?).GetDefault(); // returns 01/01/0001 00:00:00
typeof(string).GetDefault();    // returns null
typeof(Exception).GetDefault(); // returns null
1
2

I would require ValueType as the parameter to simplify:

static bool IsDefault(ValueType value){
   var @default = Activator.CreateInstance(value.GetType());
   return value.Equals(@default);  
}
1
  • cdhowie's comment has me rethinking this solution, as it does not handle the potential NullReferenceException. Be sure to handle that case or throw an ArgumentNullException if the parameter is null.
    – Gene C
    Aug 15, 2011 at 17:32
0

On a side note, Is there anything I am not considering here with respect to evaluating Nullable structs?

Yes, you are missing something. By taking an object as the parameter in you are requiring calling code to box Nullable<T> types (which converts them to null or to their T Value). So if you pass a nullable, your is/throw will throw because null will never be a value type.

Edit: As @cdhowie said, you'll need to check for null. This will work for Nullable types as well.

1
  • Another thing to consider with nullable structs is that there's no way to distinguish between e.g. an int with value zero and an int? with value zero, even though zero is the default value for the first of those types, but is not the default value for the second.
    – supercat
    Jul 16, 2013 at 18:29

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