1

I have a enum and I let each value of the enum as a key in my interface whose value is specific to the key.

Example:

enum Fruits {
  Apple = "Apple",
  Banana = "Banana",
}

// EDIT: These slicers can have completely different shapes.
interface AppleSlicer { foo: () => string }
interface BananaSlicer { bar: () => number }

interface FruitSlicers {
  [Fruits.Apple]: AppleSlicer,
  [Fruits.Banana]: BananSlicer,
}

This works well, but I want have similar code in several places and I want them to give me compile errors when there's a new entry in the enum. Currently, this doesn't do any exhaustive check, so it does not. Is it possible to achieve that with TypeScript?

3 Answers 3

3

You probably want to make use of the Record utility type, which works great with enums.

Something like:

enum Fruits {
  Apple = 'Apple',
  Banana = 'Banana',
}

type Slicer = Function; // Quick example case

type FruitSlicers = Record<Fruits, Slicer>; // <- Ensures every enum value is a key

const fruitSlicers: FruitSlicers = {
  [Fruits.Apple]: () => {},
  [Fruits.Banana]: () => {},
};

Now if I add another Fruit:

enum Fruits {
  Apple = 'Apple',
  Banana = 'Banana',
  Cherry = 'Cherry',
}

I get:

Property 'Cherry' is missing in type '{ Apple: () => void; Banana: () => void; }' but required in type 'FruitSlicers'
3
  • Thanks, I forgot to mention this, but I can't really use a Record since AppleSlicer and BananaSlicer can have completely different shapes. If I use Record, then I have two problems. 1) I'll need to list every slice as possible types, i.e. Record<string, AppleSlicer | BananaSlicer>. 2) I want Apple to map to AppleSlicer only, but in your example, fruitSlicers can have BananaSlicer assigned to Apple and vice versa. Jan 13 at 0:02
  • Yes - undoubtedly a problem - I don't know of a way to say Record<Fruit, Slicer<Fruit>> and enforce that each key and value "line up" in terms of the Fruit instance they are talking about ...
    – millhouse
    Jan 13 at 0:05
  • if there is a pattern that the interfaces for each fruit would have then we could maybe create a helper type, but without that knowledge it's a little harder to know.
    – Jhecht
    Jan 13 at 0:07
3

For this you will need type compatibility checks. My recommended library for this is ts-expect: https://github.com/TypeStrong/ts-expect

Here is a complete sample (I've inlined expectType and TypeOf from ts-expect):

export const expectType = <Type>(value: Type): void => void 0;
export type TypeOf<Target, Value> = Exclude<Value, Target> extends never
  ? true
  : false;

type AppleSlicer = { apples: number }
type BananaSlicer = { bananas: number }

enum Fruits {
  Apple = "Apple",
  Banana = "Banana",
}

type FruitSlicersComplete = {
  [Fruits.Apple]: AppleSlicer,
  [Fruits.Banana]: BananaSlicer,
}
type FruitSlicersIncomplete = {
  [Fruits.Apple]: AppleSlicer,
  // [Fruits.Banana]: BananaSlicer,
}

type FruitSlicersExhaustive = {[key in Fruits]: any}

expectType<TypeOf<FruitSlicersExhaustive,FruitSlicersComplete>>(true); // Success ✅
expectType<TypeOf<FruitSlicersExhaustive,FruitSlicersIncomplete>>(true); // Error ❌
1

You can use an identity function to constrain the input parameter type so that that it must include all of the keys in the string enum, and also all of the entries in the interface:

TS Playground

enum Fruit {
  Apple = 'Apple',
  Banana = 'Banana',
  Orange = 'Orange',
}

interface AppleSlicer { foo: () => string }
interface BananaSlicer { bar: () => number }

interface FruitSlicers {
  [Fruit.Apple]: AppleSlicer;
  [Fruit.Banana]: BananaSlicer;
}

function createSlicers <T extends Record<Fruit, unknown> & FruitSlicers>(value: T): T {
  return value;
}

const slicers1 = createSlicers({
  Apple: { foo: () => 'apple' },
  Banana: { bar: () => 1 },
}); // Error (2345)

const slicers2 = createSlicers({
  Apple: { foo: () => 'apple' },
  Banana: { bar: () => 1 },
  Orange: 'not in the interface, so can be any value',
}); // ok

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