1

I have been searching for an efficient way of uploading 100's of text files in the same folder to an SQL Server with one click of a button. I perform this every month, manually mapping the tables. It takes some time to manually choose each flat file (.txt) and map it to the correct loading table before the exact extract. I have searched many different ways, including SSIS. These are too manual and take too much time to perform and especially maintain.

I have had an idea that, for example below of 5 flat files in the same folder:

  1. Extract_ABC.txt
  2. Extract_YMCA.txt
  3. Extract_WSS.txt
  4. Extract_RMC.txt
  5. Extract_HBO.txt

To be uploaded to the SQL server in a schema [upload] with their respective file names. The final output would look like this.

  1. [servername].[upload].Extract_ABC
  2. [servername].[upload].Extract_YMCA
  3. [servername].[upload].Extract_WSS
  4. [servername].[upload].Extract_RMC
  5. [servername].[upload].Extract_HBO

These tables could then be assigned location manually in a lookup table and inserted into the correct tables. This would remove almost all manual work aside from maintaining a location table in the Server.

Note it is essential that these tables are also created when inserted as the files have unique names when extracted. Also, to note the files are pipe ( | ) delimited text files rather than CSV

Does anyone know of a way this can be performed? It would have to avoid the use of Visual Studio manual packages etc. Rather a bulk insert of every flat file into an SQL Server with their respective file names.

An efficient query/process could save me days. Also a HUGE plus if this can be run server-side at schedule times to prevent uploads from an actual active pc i.e., SQL Server Agents, etc. (Bounty to be awarded)

11
  • 3
    Powershell could likely be very useful here. You could easily iterate through the files and use sqlcmd or bcp to import the data into the relevant tables.
    – Larnu
    Jan 13 at 10:27
  • Check this answer, it is not the same case but i think it can help you thinking out of the box: stackoverflow.com/questions/54781017/…
    – Yahfoufi
    Jan 13 at 10:31
  • Side question, are your tables really all called txt and are on a schema with the file's (base)name? That is a terrible naming convention if so...
    – Larnu
    Jan 13 at 10:36
  • @Larnu no that was just the example. The files are actually extracted from SAP and have extract and variant numbers. Each of these extracts have a loading and lookup table (pre-processing needs performed on the raw data)
    – pandasman
    Jan 13 at 10:47
  • 2
    If you (now) need to CREATE the tables as well, how do you know what the definition of said tables needs to be? Do your files have accompanying format files? How do you know what data types the columns in the new table should have?
    – Larnu
    Jan 14 at 12:09

5 Answers 5

3
+25

In this answer, I will try to give some information and to provide a working example of importing several flat files with different metadata into separate SQL Server tables.

SSIS limitation

Since SSIS requires fixed metadata of the data source and destination, I suggest using a C# code rather than automating the SSIS package creation. If SSIS is required, you should use a Script Task to achieve that task.

In similar cases, I generally use C# or another scripting language such as python.

Why should you not automate the SSIS package generation?

Importing more than 100 flat files to more than 100 tables that should be created at runtime (with no fixed structure) requires creating more than 100 SSIS packages. Even if this process is automated using one of the SSIS automation tools, it is hard to manage and debug a high number of SSIS packages.

Unified SQL Server destination table?

If the destination tables structures mostly have similar structures, it is better to import all flat files into a unified SQL Server destination using a schema mapping approach, you can refer to the following answer:

Solution overview

All code provided in this solution can be improved, but it was written as a prototype

Reading flat-file

I created a class TextImport that tries to loop over all flat files within a given directory, read the flat-files metadata and store each file data within a System.Data.DataTable object. (Note that Microsoft.VisualBasic assembly should be added as a reference to use the TextFieldParser class)

TextImport txtimp = new TextImport(filename, true, 0); // TextImport(string filename, bool containsHeader, int RowsToSkip)
txtimp.BuildDataTableStructure(); //Read flat file metadata
DataTable dt = txtimp.FillDataTable(); //Convert the flat file to a DataTable object

The TextImport class tries to detect the file metadata (number of columns, delimiter, text qualifiers, encodings) based on the first 8 lines (arbitrary number) in the flat file.

Creating SQL destination table

Then this System.Data.DataTable is passed to another class called SQLExport that generates and executes a CREATE TABLE statement based on the DataTable metadata.

SQLExport.CreateDestinationTable(DataTable dt);

Inserting data into SQL

Finally, two insert methods are provided:

  1. Generate a INSERT INTO () ... VALUES (),(),()... statement and execute it to insert data into SQL destination
  2. Using System.Data.SqlClient.SqlBulkCopy class to insert data using BULK INSERT method.

The main code should look like the following:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    //You should set your database connection string
    string connectionstring = @"Data Source=.\SQLINSTANCE;Initial Catalog=tempdb;integrated security=SSPI;";
    //This is the schema of the destination table
    string Schema = "upload";
    //You should set the text files directory
    string directory = @"E:\TextFiles";
    using (SQLExport sqlExp = new SQLExport(connectionstring, Schema))
    {
        //if you don't want to traverse subfolders use System.IO.SearchOption.TopDirectoryOnly
        foreach (string filename in System.IO.Directory.GetFiles(directory,
            "*.txt",System.IO.SearchOption.AllDirectories)){

            using(TextImport txtimp = new TextImport(filename, true, 0))
            {
                txtimp.BuildDataTableStructure();
                DataTable dt = txtimp.FillDataTable();
                dt.TableName = System.IO.Path.GetFileName(filename);
                sqlExp.CreateDestinationTable(dt);
                //Insert using BULK INSERT
                sqlExp.InsertUsingSQLBulk(dt);
                        
                //Creates and Execute an INSERT INTO statment 
                //sqlExp.InsertIntoDb(dt);
            }
        }            
    }

}

Test

I tested this solution on two flat files stored on the following link (the first result of my Google search), as shown in the screenshots below, tables are created successfully, and data is inserted.

Note that all columns are created a NVARCHAR(255), you can change this within the SQLExport.cs file

enter image description here

enter image description here

You can check the complete code in the following GitHub repository (.NET Framework 4.6.1 C# console application):

If you decided to use a Script Task to run this code, you should only copy the classes from the GitHub project into your Script Task project Remember to add Microsoft.VisualBasic as a reference.

How to run a C# console application from an SQL Server Agent Job?

You can simply edit the C# Console application to pass the connection string and text files directory as arguments, then run it using a cmdExec job step:

Or even by using an SSIS package:

Alternative - using Task Scheduler

Another alternative is to use Windows Task Scheduler to periodically run the C# console application.

2

As I mentioned, I would actually use something like Powershell to do this. The script to do so is actually quite simple.

#Below is a Linux Path, as I am running SQL Server (and Powershell) on Linux
$ImportFolder = "/home/mssql/ImportSample" #The Folder your files are in
$Instance = "." #The Instance you are inserting the data into. "." means local host
$Database = "ImportSample" #The database you are inserting the data into

$Files = Get-ChildItem -Path $ImportFolder -Filter "*.txt" #Get all the txt files

#Loop the files
foreach($File in $Files){
    #Create the statement
    $SQL = "BULK INSERT dbo.[$($File.BaseName.Replace("]","]]"))] FROM '$($File.FullName.Replace("'","''"))' WITH (FORMAT = 'CSV', FIELDTERMINATOR = ',', ROWTERMINATOR = '0x0a', FIRSTROW = 2);"

    Write-Debug $SQL

    #Execute the statement
    Invoke-SqlCmd -ServerInstance $Instance -Database $Database -Query $SQL
}

This assumes Windows Authentication, however, if you are using SQL Authentication you can pass the -Username and -Password switches to Invoke-SqlCmd.


Note: This answer was written before the necessity to CREATE the tables was added. This does not meet the new requirement, however, I am leaving the answer here as it may still prove useful to others with a question similar to the original version of this question, without said requirement.

7
  • Would this method work with a pipe delimited text field instead of a CSV?
    – pandasman
    Jan 13 at 11:56
  • Just change the parameters of the BULK INSERT appropriately for your terminators, @pandasman . So you can see I state a comma (,) for the field terminator, and a line feed (0x0a) for the row terminator. I do assume you're using SQL Server 2017+ mind. Though provided you aren't using quote identifiers, then you could just remove the FORMAT for older versions.
    – Larnu
    Jan 13 at 11:58
  • I am being returned an error message saying : Invalid object name 'the actual file name' (without .txt). This doesn't seem to be working. I will post the full error below. The error shows for two extracts in the same folder
    – pandasman
    Jan 13 at 15:52
  • Invoke-SqlCmd : Invalid object name 'dbo.000088_000007'. At line:15 char:5 + Invoke-SqlCmd -ServerInstance $Instance -Database $Database -Quer ... + ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ + CategoryInfo : InvalidOperation: (:) [Invoke-Sqlcmd], SqlPowerShellSqlExecutionException + FullyQualifiedErrorId : SqlError,Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.PowerShell.GetScriptCommand Invoke-SqlCmd : Invalid object name 'dbo.000089_000003'. At line:15 char:5 + Invoke-SqlCmd -ServerInstance $Instance -Database $Database -Quer ... +
    – pandasman
    Jan 13 at 15:53
  • 2
    "Invalid object name 'dbo.000088_00000'" The error is telling you the problem. The table doesn't exist. It was assumed that the tables exist, and it's implied in your question.
    – Larnu
    Jan 13 at 15:54
1

I have posted this as a new answer, rather than editing my existing one, as the my original answer answers the original question.

Saying that, this answer simply expands on the existing answer. Unfortunately no details were given on what the data types of the data in the table should be, so I have assumed that all data will be an nvarchar(200). You can change that in the dynamic statement, however, note this solution assumes all data has the same data type. If this isn't true, and you need strongly typed data, it's time to ask a new question (don't be a chameleon).


Anyway, as I said, this expands on the existing answer from me. You'll note an additional section of code, this handles the creation of the table, dynamically.

I create a temporary table (which would be limited to the scope of the Invoke-Sqlcmd is it created in), to INSERT the first row from your file, which I assume has the headers. For the field terminator, I use a character I assume won't appear in your data, a pipe (|). If they can, use a different character. I then only INSERT the first row (hence FIRSTROW and LASTROW but having the value 1). This INSERTs the first row from the file as a delimited value.

Next I create a dynamic statement and split that value up into rows, and reaggregate, but quoting the field names, and defining the data type (nvarchar(200)). You will need to use a string splitter that respects ordinal positions here, NOT STRING_SPLIT. I use DelimitedSplitN4K_LEAD (which is located in my Utility database), and its definition can be found here.

Finally that dynamic statement is executed, created the table with the column names in the right order, all with the data type nvarchar(200). The Invoke-Sqlcmd then executes that statement.

Then we go back to the original solution, and BULK INSERT the data.

$ImportFolder = "/home/mssql/ImportSample" #The Folder your files are in
$Instance = "." #The Instance you are inserting the data into. "." means local host
$Database = "ImportSample" #The database you are inserting the data into

$Files = Get-ChildItem -Path $ImportFolder -Filter "*.txt" #Get all the txt files

#Loop the files
foreach($File in $Files){
    #Create the creation statement
    Write-Verbose "Defining table creation script for $($File.Name)."
    $CreateSQL = "CREATE TABLE #Rows (DelimitedData nvarchar(4000));`n" +
                 "BULK INSERT #Rows FROM '$($File.FullName.Replace("'","''"))' WITH(FORMAT = 'CSV', FIELDTERMINATOR = '|', ROWTERMINATOR = '0x0a', FIRSTROW = 1, LASTROW = 1);`n" + 
                 "DECLARE @SQL nvarchar(MAX);`n" +
                 "SELECT @SQL = N'CREATE TABLE dbo.[$($File.BaseName.Replace("]","]]"))] (' + STRING_AGG(QUOTENAME(DSL.Item) + N' nvarchar(200)',N',') WITHIN GROUP (ORDER BY DSL.ItemNumber) + N');' FROM #Rows R CROSS APPLY Utility.fn.DelimitedSplitN4K_LEAD(R.DelimitedData,N',') DSL;`n" + 
                 "EXEC sys.sp_executesql @SQL;"
    
    #Execute the statement
    Write-Verbose "Table creation script for $($File.Name) generated:"
    Write-Verbose $CreateSQL
    Invoke-SqlCmd -ServerInstance $Instance -Database $Database -Query $CreateSQL -Username $User -Password $Password
    
    #Create the Insert statement
    Write-Verbose "Defining BULK INSERT script for $($File.Name)."
    $InsertSQL = "BULK INSERT dbo.[$($File.BaseName.Replace("]","]]"))] FROM '$($File.FullName.Replace("'","''"))' WITH (FORMAT = 'CSV', FIELDTERMINATOR = ',', ROWTERMINATOR = '0x0a', FIRSTROW = 2);"

    Write-Verbose "BULK INSERT script for $($File.Name) generated:"
    Write-Verbose $InsertSQL

    #Execute the statement
    Invoke-SqlCmd -ServerInstance $Instance -Database $Database -Query $InsertSQL -Username $User -Password $Password
}

Couple of screenshots demonstrating this working (as can't be demonstrated with a fiddle): enter image description here

enter image description here

1

Note: I added asynchronous code to be run in console application Core3.1 or later at the bottom.

I kind of took this as a challenge to see if I could do it. Here is what I came up with in c#...

Basic concept:

  1. Loop through files

  2. Read each file into a data table using pipe(|) as delimeter

  3. Read header row into string List

  4. Create a table based on headers all of data type varchar(255)

  5. Load Data table into new table using Bulk Copy.

     public static string cstr = "Enter your connection string to destination here";
    
     //if you are going to use script task inside SSIS then this is what goes into whatever the Main is in SSIS.
     static void Main(string[] args)
     {
         var dir = @"C:\whereever";
    
         foreach(var file in new DirectoryInfo(dir).GetFiles().AsEnumerable().Where(f=>f.Extension.Contains("txt")))
         {
             DataTable dt = ConvertCSVtoDataTable(file.FullName, '|');
             //getColumnNames into an object
             List<string> colNames = new List<string>();
             foreach (DataColumn dc in dt.Columns)
                 colNames.Add(dc.ColumnName);
    
             //create table
             string tableName = Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension(file.Name);
             createTable(colNames, tableName);
             //load table
             loadDtIntoDb(dt, colNames, tableName);
         }
     }
    
     public static void loadDtIntoDb(DataTable dt, List<string> cols, string tableName)
     {
         using (var conn = new SqlConnection(cstr))
         {
             using (var bcp = new SqlBulkCopy(conn))
             {
                 bcp.DestinationTableName = tableName;
                 foreach (var col in cols)
                     bcp.ColumnMappings.Add(col, col);
                 conn.Open();
                 bcp.WriteToServer(dt);
             }
         }
     }
    
     public static void createTable(List<string> dcs,string tableName)
     {
         StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
             sb.AppendLine(string.Format("Create table {0}(", tableName));
         foreach (var dc in dcs)
             sb.AppendLine(string.Format("{0} varchar(255),", dc));
         //Clean sql by removing final ',' and adding a close paren 
         string sql = sb.ToString().TrimEnd(',') + ")";
         using (var conn = new SqlConnection(cstr))
         {
             using (var cmd = new SqlCommand(sql, conn))
             {
                 conn.Open();
                 cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
             }
         }
     }
    
     public static DataTable ConvertCSVtoDataTable(string strFilePath, char delim)
     {
         DataTable dt = new DataTable();
         using (StreamReader sr = new StreamReader(strFilePath))
         {
             string[] headers = sr.ReadLine().Split(delim);
             foreach (string header in headers)
             {
                 dt.Columns.Add(header);
             }
             while (!sr.EndOfStream)
             {
                 string[] rows = sr.ReadLine().Split(delim);
                 DataRow dr = dt.NewRow();
                 for (int i = 0; i < headers.Length; i++)
                 {
                     dr[i] = rows[i];
                 }
                 dt.Rows.Add(dr);
             }
         }
         return dt;
     }
    

Here is a list of my using statements:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Data;
using System.IO;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using Microsoft.Data.SqlClient;

I see you are looking for efficiency. Here is how to do it asynchronously:

public static string cstr = "Enter your connection string to destination here";

 //This cannot be done in SSIS
 static async Task Main(string[] args)
 {
     var dir = @"C:\whereever";
 
     var files = new DirectoryInfo(dir).GetFiles().AsEnumerable().Where(f=>f.Extension.Contains("txt")))
     await Task.WhenAll(files.Select(async f=> await processFile(f)));
  }

 public statis async Task processFile(File file)
 {
     DataTable dt = await ConvertCSVtoDataTable(file.FullName, '|');
     //getColumnNames into an object
     List<string> colNames = new List<string>();
     foreach (DataColumn dc in dt.Columns)
         colNames.Add(dc.ColumnName);

     //create table
     string tableName = Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension(file.Name);
     await createTable(colNames, tableName);
     //load table
     await loadDtIntoDb(dt, colNames, tableName);
 }



public static async Task loadDtIntoDb(DataTable dt, List<string> cols, string tableName)
 {
     using (var conn = new SqlConnection(cstr))
     {
         using (var bcp = new SqlBulkCopy(conn))
         {
             bcp.DestinationTableName = tableName;
             foreach (var col in cols)
                 bcp.ColumnMappings.Add(col, col);
             conn.Open();
             await bcp.WriteToServerAsync(dt);
         }
     }
 }

 public static async Task createTable(List<string> dcs,string tableName)
 {
     StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
         sb.AppendLine(string.Format("Create table {0}(", tableName));
     foreach (var dc in dcs)
         sb.AppendLine(string.Format("{0} varchar(255),", dc));
     //Clean sql by removing final ',' and adding a close paren 
     string sql = sb.ToString().TrimEnd(',') + ")";
     using (var conn = new SqlConnection(cstr))
     {
         using (var cmd = new SqlCommand(sql, conn))
         {
             conn.Open();
             await cmd.ExecuteNonQueryAsync();
         }
     }
 

 public static async Task<DataTable> ConvertCSVtoDataTable(string strFilePath, char delim)
 {
     DataTable dt = new DataTable();
     using (StreamReader sr = new StreamReader(strFilePath))
     {
         string[] headers = await sr.ReadLineAsync().Split(delim);
         foreach (string header in headers)
         {
             dt.Columns.Add(header);
         }
         while (!sr.EndOfStream)
         {
             string[] rows = await sr.ReadLineAsync().Split(delim);
             DataRow dr = dt.NewRow();
             for (int i = 0; i < headers.Length; i++)
             {
                 dr[i] = rows[i];
             }
             dt.Rows.Add(dr);
         }
     }
     return dt;
 }
2
  • 2
    You can easily make this asynchronous but not inside SSIS so I left it in this format.
    – KeithL
    Jan 13 at 18:51
  • Note: this is written net5.0 Microsoft.Data.SqlClient is a Nuget, if using SSIS you will need to reference System.Data.SqlClient instead.
    – KeithL
    Jan 13 at 18:56
1

Here is a stored procedure that uses a dynamic script to:

  1. BULK INSERT the file into table [My_bulk_insert_data] assuming that the first line of the file contains the column names:
  2. Then bulk insert using a dynamic script taking into account the column names

create proc usp_bulkinsert_file(@fullfilename as nvarchar(max))

as
begin
   

declare @filename as nvarchar(max)
set @filename = substring(@fullfilename,1 + LEN(@fullfilename) - CHARINDEX('\', REVERSE(@fullfilename)) + 1, len(@fullfilename))

declare @script as nvarchar(max)
if exists(select 1 from sysobjects where name = 'My_bulk_insert_data') drop table My_bulk_insert_data
set @script = 'if exists(select 1 from sysobjects where name =''' + @filename + ''') drop table [' + @filename + ']'
exec(@script)

create table My_bulk_insert_data(data nvarchar(max))

set @script='
BULK INSERT dbo.My_bulk_insert_data
FROM ''' + @fullfilename + '''
WITH
(
   FIELDTERMINATOR = ''''
) 
'
print @script

exec(@script)

declare @data as nvarchar(max)
select top 1 @data = data from My_bulk_insert_data



set @script = 'Create Table [' + @filename + ']('
select @script = @script + '[' + value + ']' + ' nvarchar(max) ,' from string_split(@data, '|') My_bulk_insert_data

set @script = SUBSTRING(@script, 1, len(@script) - 1) + ')'

print @script

exec(@script)

set @script='BULK INSERT [' + @filename + ']' + ' from ''' + @fullfilename + '''
with
(
FIELDTERMINATOR = ''|''
)
' 
print @script
exec(@script)

end

Results Screenshot

enter image description here

1
  • Even if I think that using a script language approach gives more flexibility, I liked doing that with dynamic SQL. +1
    – Hadi
    Jan 24 at 10:20

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