23

Let's say we have these 3 classes:

class A { }
class B extends A { }

public class App {
    static void f(int i, A a) { }
    static void f(float j, B b) { }
   
    static public void main() {
        int i = 0;
        B b = new B();
        App.f(i, b);
    }
}

This produces the error:

App.java:11: error: reference to f is ambiguous
        App.f(i, b);
           ^
  both method f(int,A) in App and method f(float,B) in App match
1 error

Why does it not choose the type f(int, A) since i is an integer?

4
  • 4
    Why should it not choose the type f(float, B) when b is a B and i can be automatically widened to float? Jan 13 at 20:18
  • 1
    @thatotherguy that's what i thought about but then why when you have for example f(int a){ } and f(float b) {} and you pass an integer to f , it doesn't generate this error? Jan 13 at 20:22
  • 2
    @thatotherguy: Since conversions from int and long to float are potentially lossy, it would make sense for a language to regard a "precise" fit of the numeric type as more significant than a precise fit of a reference type. Java's rules, however, were designed to prioritize simplicity over sensible corner-case behaviors, with the effect that passing a value of type long to Math.round() will yield a value of type int.
    – supercat
    Jan 13 at 20:24
  • 9
    @RafikBouloudene: If an overload exists which for which every argument matches the passed value as well or better than any alternative, it will be used. In your two-argument example, the first overload doesn't offer as good a match for the second argument as the second one does, and the second overload doesn't offer as good a match for the first argument as the first one does.
    – supercat
    Jan 13 at 20:28
29

It is ambiguous because of two reasons:

  • both overloads are applicable, and;
  • neither overload is more specific than the other

Notice that both the f(int, A) overload and the f(float, B) overload can be called with the parameters (i, b), since there is an implicit conversion from int to float, and an implicit conversion from B to A.

What happens when there are more than one applicable method? Java is supposed to choose the most specific method. This is described in §15.12.2.5 of the language spec. It turns out that it is not the case that one of these overloads are more specific than the other.

One applicable method m1 is more specific than another applicable method m2, for an invocation with argument expressions e1, ..., ek, if any of the following are true:

  • m2 is generic [...]

  • m2 is not generic, and m1 and m2 are applicable by strict or loose invocation, and where m1 has formal parameter types S1, ..., Sn and m2 has formal parameter types T1, ..., Tn, the type Si is more specific than Ti for argument ei for all i (1 ≤ i ≤ n, n = k).

  • m2 is not generic, and m1 and m2 are applicable by variable arity invocation [...]

Only the second point applies to the two overloads of f. For one of the overloads to be more specific than the other, every parameter type of one overload has to be more specific than the corresponding parameter type in the other overload.

A type S is more specific than a type T for any expression if S <: T (§4.10).

Note that"<:" is the subtyping relationship. B is clearly a subtype of A. float is actually a supertype (not subtype!) of int. This can be derived from the direct subtyping relations listed in §4.10.1. Therefore, neither of the overloads is more specific than the other.

The language spec goes on to talk about maximally specific methods, which doesn't really apply to f here. Finally, it says:

Otherwise, the method invocation is ambiguous, and a compile-time error occurs.

More Examples

static void f(int x) {}
static void f(float x) {}

when called with an int are not ambiguous because the int overload is more specific.

static void f(int x, B a) {}
static void f(float x, A a) {}

when called with argument types (int, A) are not ambiguous because the (int, B) overload is more specific.

static void f(int x, A a) {}
static void f(float x, A a) {}

when called with argument types(int, A) are not ambiguous because the (int, A) overload is more specific. Note that the subtyping relationship is reflexive (i.e. A is a subtype of A).

0
0

Note that for calling an overloaded method in java :

Priority Order for Primitive types:

Same type > Auto Widening > Boxing > Upcasting(Parent Class) > Super Class

Priority Order for Reference types:

Same type > Upcasting(Parent Class) > Super Class > Unboxing

Explanation :

    // you have here a method who accept an int = same Type 
    //  f(int i, A a) { } and this method can accept the other parameter 
    //  because B is a subclass of A
    int i = 0;
    // But You have a method who accept a B reference = same Type 
    // f(float j, B b) { } and this method can accept the other parameter 
    // because float is actually a supertype of int as mentionned by Sweeper
    B b = new B();

 // So calling the method with an int and a B reference 
 // will confuse the compiler because both of the two methods
 // accept one parameter as "same type" 
 // and can accept the other parameter
    App.f(i, b);
1
  • 2
    This “priority order” is completely made up and not even remotely matching, how the language rules work.
    – Holger
    Jan 14 at 8:53

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.