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The error -> TypeError: unhashable type: 'list' disappears after saving the data frame and loading it again ...

Both data frames [saved and loaded, generated] have the same dtypes ...

Reproducible ->

--> import pandas as pd
--> l1 = [[1], [1], [1], [1], [1], [1], [1], [1], [6], [1], [6], [1], [6], [6], [6], [6], [6], [6], [6], [6], [6]]

## len(l1) is 21 ##

--> l2 = ['a']*21
--> l3 = ['c']*10 + ['d']*10 + ['e']
--> df = pd.DataFrame()
--> df['col1'], df['col2'], df['col3'] = l1, l3, l2
--> df
        col1 col2 col3
        0   [1]    c    a
        1   [1]    c    a
        2   [1]    c    a
        3   [1]    c    a
        4   [1]    c    a
        5   [1]    c    a
        6   [1]    c    a
        7   [1]    c    a
        8   [6]    c    a
        9   [1]    c    a
        10  [6]    d    a
        11  [1]    d    a
        12  [6]    d    a
        13  [6]    d    a
        14  [6]    d    a
        15  [6]    d    a
        16  [6]    d    a
        17  [6]    d    a
        18  [6]    d    a
        19  [6]    d    a
        20  [6]    e    a

--> df.dtypes
        col1    object
        col2    object
        col3    object
        dtype: object

--> df.drop_duplicates(subset=['col1', 'col2', 'col3'], keep='last', inplace=True)
        
        ## TypeError: unhashable type: 'list' ##

## Here if I save it as an excel and load again, then this error does not come up ... ##

--> df.to_excel('test.xlsx')
--> df_ = pd.read_excel('test.xlsx')
--> df_.dtypes
        Unnamed: 0     int64
        col1    object
        col2    object
        col3    object
        dtype: object
--> df_.drop_duplicates(subset=['col1', 'col2', 'col3'], keep='last', inplace=True)
--> df_
         Unnamed: 0 col1 col2 col3
        8       8   [6]    c    a
        9       9   [1]    c    a
        11      11  [1]    d    a
        19      19  [6]    d    a
        20      20  [6]    e    a

Does this behaviour have an explanation ?

Extended Traceback of Issue

Traceback (most recent call last):

File "", line 1, in

File "C:\Users\Agnij\Anaconda3\lib\site-packages\pandas\core\frame.py", line 4811, in drop_duplicates

duplicated = self.duplicated(subset, keep=keep)

File "C:\Users\Agnij\Anaconda3\lib\site-packages\pandas\core\frame.py", line 4888, in duplicated labels, shape = map(list, zip(*map(f, vals)))

File "C:\Users\Agnij\Anaconda3\lib\site-packages\pandas\core\frame.py", line 4863, in f vals, size_hint=min(len(self), _SIZE_HINT_LIMIT)

File "C:\Users\Agnij\Anaconda3\lib\site-packages\pandas\core\algorithms.py", line 636, in factorize values, na_sentinel=na_sentinel, size_hint=size_hint, na_value=na_value

File "C:\Users\Agnij\Anaconda3\lib\site-packages\pandas\core\algorithms.py", line 484, in _factorize_array uniques, codes = table.factorize(values, na_sentinel=na_sentinel, na_value=na_value)

File "pandas_libs\hashtable_class_helper.pxi", line 1815, in pandas._libs.hashtable.PyObjectHashTable.factorize

File "pandas_libs\hashtable_class_helper.pxi", line 1731, in pandas._libs.hashtable.PyObjectHashTable._unique

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2 Answers 2

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drop_duplicates hashes the objects to keep track of which ones have been seen or not, efficiently.

lists are not hashable (as they are mutable), thus you can't use drop_duplicates on them directly. When you save and load the data, chances are that it is converted to string, which enables the hash to be calculated.

To overcome the issue, you can convert the lists to tuples, that are hashable:

df['col1'] = df['col1'].apply(tuple)
# now this runs with no error
df.drop_duplicates(subset=['col1', 'col2', 'col3'], keep='last', inplace=True)
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  • Thanks! as pointed out by @enke I directly converted it to str -> df['col1'] = df['col1'].astype(str), will consider the tuple way if I encounter lists having more than one value.
    – Agnij
    Jan 15 at 6:14
  • @Agnij yes of course, that works too. The issue is only that it might be harder to reverse the operation if you need to have lists again. Btw, if you have single elements, why use a list at all? Just store the elements in the column directly, no?
    – mozway
    Jan 15 at 6:19
  • currently not reversing it back ... but If required I will refer this. Thought of that, but just wanted to be on the safer side in case multiple elements come up ... this is a case where the scope of the number of elements is not exactly defined
    – Agnij
    Jan 15 at 6:27
1

Because even though both columns are dtype objects, the items in them are different types:

>>> df.loc[0,'col1']
[1]


>>> df_.loc[0, 'col1']
'[1]'

Since strings are hashable, you don't see the error that you had before with lists.

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  • Understood Thanks!, was only looking at dtype objects
    – Agnij
    Jan 15 at 6:17

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