10

I Have a form with one textbox called(ProductTitle)

if I write as example "Étuit" in the textbox and click on Save, I post the data in a table called Product. The result int the database for ProductTitle is Étuit. My concern is about the Special character. Instead of putting É in the database , I got that É

When I Load the Product Title ("Étuit") from the database into a span. That show correctly.
BUT When I load it inside a Textbox to Edit the Product Title, that show Étuit.

Anybody know why.

I Put that in the html head

<head>
     <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" />

Note : When I Click save on the form, the data is posted with jquery ajax method.

  • What is your database's collation? – sdleihssirhc Aug 16 '11 at 3:40
  • 1
    it's utf8_general_ci on both database and table – Jean-Francois Aug 16 '11 at 3:44
  • +1 this is a common issue. – AlienWebguy Aug 16 '11 at 4:00
  • @Jean-Francois There's nothing "special" about the character "É". Also, please review the currently accepted answer. It is wrong. – deceze Aug 16 '11 at 5:06
6

Take a look at utf8_encode() and utf8_decode(). Also take a look at multibyte string functions.

  • 1
    thanks, it's seem to work now . – Jean-Francois Aug 16 '11 at 3:49
  • Glad to help! :) – AlienWebguy Aug 16 '11 at 4:01
  • Sorry, but unless you can explain what utf8_encode actually does and why this would be better than @gview's solution, I'll have to give you a -1. – deceze Aug 16 '11 at 4:34
  • 1
    Try saving the text "エンコード" into your UTF-8 database (which should be able to handle it, right?) using utf8_encode/utf8_decode and tell me if it's still working. – deceze Aug 16 '11 at 6:14
  • 2
    Thanks deceze, I configured my database correctly. You absolutely right. Do thing properly paid one day :) – Jean-Francois Aug 24 '11 at 14:48
9

Probably what is happening is that the default character set for the client is not set to UTF-8, so you're getting tranposition in one direction or the other. This is covered in a number of different ways here:

Often an initialization query of "SET NAMES utf8" just after the connection is instantiated will solve the issue going forward but make sure that what you think is stored (utf8) is actually what was stored. You might have a cleanup job if not.

  • +1 for the only really correct answer in this thread. – deceze Aug 16 '11 at 4:38
  • The problem here, is all the answer work really good, it's hard to find who got the best answer. I Use Doctrine , and it's not necessary to apply Set Name on mysql_query. Thanks for your help too – Jean-Francois Aug 16 '11 at 16:48
  • 1
    Jean-Francois, you might want to go back and edit your question to indicate that Doctrine was involved. It would have been helpful information. Are you configuring your connection using $manager->setCharset('utf8'); It would be good to know how this was ultimately handled for future reference. – gview Aug 16 '11 at 21:14
  • As the guide in @gview's link suggests, setting the html form attribute "<form accept-charset="utf-8">" solved the OP's issue for me. – yunusual Mar 25 '13 at 12:32
9

Try seting the client encoding before using the DB.

mysql_query("SET NAMES 'utf8'");

If the above doesn't work use the utf8 encode/decode functions:

<?
$string ="Étuit";
?>
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" />
</head>
<?
echo $string; // echo's '?tuit'
echo utf8_encode($string); // echo's 'Étuit'
?>
  • Either or. If you set everything to UTF-8, there's no need for utf8_encode. Do you know what this function actually does? – deceze Aug 16 '11 at 4:36
  • deceze : it encodes a string to utf8. Nice picture you've on your profile ;) – Pedro Lobito Aug 16 '11 at 4:50
  • 1
    But the string is already encoded in UTF-8, at least it's supposed to be! While you're on my profile, please click through to the long ranty article I wrote about encodings, which goes through this in more detail. – deceze Aug 16 '11 at 4:52
  • 2
    @deceze you're taking this function way too personally and come across as a douche with all the righteous downvoting. – AlienWebguy Aug 16 '11 at 11:34
  • @Alien Yes, encodings are my current pet peeve, because too many people are spreading bad advice and half-truths about them without understanding how they really work. If you have some advice for me how I can make people understand that their knowledge about encodings is incomplete without coming across as a douche, please let me know, I'm always open to improvement. – deceze Aug 16 '11 at 11:53
0

Not to bother with SET NAMES before every connection in the code, a parameter in mysql connection string can be used:

"jdbc:mysql://hostAddress:port/databaseName?characterEncoding=UTF-8"
0

This post explains how to configure and work with UTF-8 in PHP and MySQL. Hope that saves your time.

A UTF-8 Primer for PHP and MySQL

0

These work for me:

In the HTML headers:

<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" />

After the PHP connection:

$conexion = @mysql_connect($servidor, $usuario, $contrasenha);
mysql_select_db($BD, $conexion) or die(mysql_error($conexion));
mysql_query("SET NAMES 'utf8'");
0

I just use set_charset method when i'm using mysqli lib.

error_reporting(E_ALL);

$mysqli = new mysqli('localhost', 'login', "pass", 'database');

if ( ! $mysqli->set_charset("utf8") )
{
   printf("Error loading character set utf8: %s\n", $mysqli->error);
}
0

I also had difficulties with this, but the following always works for me ! Before manipulating your data, make sure to set the encoding as follows:

try{
  $dbh = new PDO($dsn, $user, $pass);
  $dbh->query("SET NAMES 'utf8'");
  print "Connected";
 }

catch(PDOException $e){
  print "Error!!   " . $e->getMessage()."<br/>";
  die();
 }

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