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I'm trying to drop my database and create a new one through the command line.

I log in using psql -U username and then do a \connect template1, followed by a DROP DATABASE databasename;.

I get the error

database databasename is being accessed by other users

I shut down Apache and tried this again but I'm still getting this error. Am I doing something wrong?

closed as off topic by Dave Jarvis, DocMax, Bohemian, brenjt, user177800 Jan 20 '13 at 7:52

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  • 1
    What happens if you just run the dropdb databasename command from the command line? – Dylan Markow Aug 16 '11 at 5:02
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    It says "ERROR: cannot drop the currently open database" – iman453 Aug 16 '11 at 5:04
  • 4
    Use psql -U <user> -c "drop database protodb" (without database name) – user May 23 '14 at 12:36
  • 3
    This will restart postgres and disconnect everyone: sudo service postgresql restart Then do a: dropdb -h localhost -p 5432 -U "youruser" "testdb" Notice the "" to make sure special characters go in without a hitch. – unom Jun 26 '14 at 6:11
  • drop database <dataabase_name>; Don't forget the comma. – Sandip Subedi Jun 4 at 20:44
410

You can run the dropdb command from the command line:

dropdb 'database name'

Note that you have to be a superuser or the database owner to be able to drop it.

You can also check the pg_stat_activity view to see what type of activity is currently taking place against your database, including all idle processes.

SELECT * FROM pg_stat_activity WHERE datname='database name';
  • 3
    I'm using dropuser command to remove also the user. – pl1nk Sep 5 '12 at 15:26
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    Not helpful answer as for version 9. The error about opened connections appears still. – Pavel Vlasov Apr 17 '14 at 9:25
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    This will restart postgres and disconnect everyone: sudo service postgresql restart Then do a: dropdb -h localhost -p 5432 -U "youruser" "testdb" Notice the "" to make sure special characters go in without a hitch. – unom Jun 26 '14 at 6:10
  • 1
    using the postgres user: sudo -u postgres dropdb 'database name' – leszek.hanusz Jan 24 '15 at 12:06
  • \l to see all the databases you have. – Sandip Subedi Jun 4 at 20:39
105

This worked for me:

select pg_terminate_backend(pid) from pg_stat_activity where datname='YourDatabase';

for postgresql earlier than 9.2 replace pid with procpid

DROP DATABASE "YourDatabase";

http://blog.gahooa.com/2010/11/03/how-to-force-drop-a-postgresql-database-by-killing-off-connection-processes/

  • 11
    Had to change it a bit to work: select pg_terminate_backend(pid) from pg_stat_activity where datname='YourDatabase'; – mrt Aug 16 '13 at 9:47
  • column "procpid" does not exist for amazon RDS postgres 9.6 instance – anon58192932 May 9 '18 at 13:10
  • Hm. Ran this, but it just reconnected immediately, after saying, "SSL connection closed unexpectedly [...] attempting to reset: Succeeded." Annnd, I'm back. – mlissner Nov 12 '18 at 19:03
61

Try this. Note there's no database specified - it just runs "on the server"

psql -U postgres -c "drop database databasename"

If that doesn't work, I have seen a problem with postgres holding onto orphaned prepared statements.
To clean them up, do this:

SELECT * FROM pg_prepared_xacts;

then for every id you see, run this:

ROLLBACK PREPARED '<id>';
  • Sorry I am new to databases, so this is probably a stupid question, but where do I type this out? Before logging into the database right? And I should replace databasename with the name of my database right? – iman453 Aug 16 '11 at 5:11
  • @iman453: You'd run that straight from your shell/command-line. – mu is too short Aug 16 '11 at 5:26
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    There's no such things as "just on the server" for postgresql. You must connect to a database. In this case you'll be connecting to the postgres database which is pretty much there just for cases like this. And a good point on prepared transactions, but in that case you should get an error message saying that's the issue. – Scott Marlowe Aug 17 '11 at 3:11
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    Sorry Bohemian, but you are the one who's wrong. Here's pg_stat_activity while running createdb from the command line: postgres=# select * from pg_stat_activity ; 11564 | postgres | 22223 | 16384 | smarlowe | CREATE DATABASE test; | f | 2011-08-19 16:18:26.918933-06 | 2011-08-19 16:18:26.918933-06 | 2011-08-19 16:18:26.916578-06 | | -1 Note that this happens while running createdb from the command line in another terminal. That first field is the db that my createdb script was connected to – Scott Marlowe Aug 19 '11 at 22:19
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    Why isn't this the top, #1 answer? – Henley Chiu Oct 31 '16 at 14:22
14

When it says users are connected, what does the query "select * from pg_stat_activity;" say? Are the other users besides yourself now connected? If so, you might have to edit your pg_hba.conf file to reject connections from other users, or shut down whatever app is accessing the pg database to be able to drop it. I have this problem on occasion in production. Set pg_hba.conf to have a two lines like this:

local   all         all                               ident
host    all         all         127.0.0.1/32          reject

and tell pgsql to reload or restart (i.e. either sudo /etc/init.d/postgresql reload or pg_ctl reload) and now the only way to connect to your machine is via local sockets. I'm assuming you're on linux. If not this may need to be tweaked to something other than local / ident on that first line, to something like host ... yourusername.

Now you should be able to do:

psql postgres
drop database mydatabase;

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