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It seems I need some help with resizing the BMP image when the zoom factor is less than 1. You can see the most crucial part of my code below. The variable f in the code is the zoom factor. It seems logical to me but it works improperly. small.bmp - this is the image I need to resize (to make it even smaller). large - and this is the result picture which doesn't look properly. I think I failed in uploading that here, but it looks like a small green square without any white center at all.

Moreover, I tried to resize one more image - this beautiful smiley: smiley And the result was rather unexpected: smiley_resized

This makes me think that there's a problem with the for-cycles, though it seems completely logical to me.

And this is how the BMP is organized.

    // BMP-related data types based on Microsoft's own

#include <stdint.h>

// aliases for C/C++ primitive data types
// https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc230309.aspx
typedef uint8_t  BYTE;
typedef uint32_t DWORD;
typedef int32_t  LONG;
typedef uint16_t WORD;

// information about the type, size, and layout of a file
// https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd183374(v=vs.85).aspx
typedef struct
{
    WORD bfType;
    DWORD bfSize;
    WORD bfReserved1;
    WORD bfReserved2;
    DWORD bfOffBits;
} __attribute__((__packed__))
BITMAPFILEHEADER;

// information about the dimensions and color format
// https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd183376(v=vs.85).aspx
typedef struct
{
    DWORD biSize;
    LONG biWidth;
    LONG biHeight;
    WORD biPlanes;
    WORD biBitCount;
    DWORD biCompression;
    DWORD biSizeImage;
    LONG biXPelsPerMeter;
    LONG biYPelsPerMeter;
    DWORD biClrUsed;
    DWORD biClrImportant;
} __attribute__((__packed__))
BITMAPINFOHEADER;

// relative intensities of red, green, and blue
// https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd162939(v=vs.85).aspx
typedef struct
{
    BYTE rgbtBlue;
    BYTE rgbtGreen;
    BYTE rgbtRed;
} __attribute__((__packed__))
RGBTRIPLE;

Does anybody know how to fix the code below?

// Copies a BMP file

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

#include "bmp.h"

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    // ensure proper usage
    if (argc != 4)
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "Usage: resize n infile outfile\n");
        return 1;
    }

    // remember filenames
    float f=atof(argv[1]);
    int n=f;
    if(f<=0||f>=1){
        fprintf(stderr, "f, the resize factor, must be between 0 and 1.\n");
        return 1;
    }
    char *infile = argv[2];
    char *outfile = argv[3];

    // open input file
    FILE *inptr = fopen(infile, "r");
    if (inptr == NULL)
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "Could not open %s.\n", infile);
        return 2;
    }

    // open output file
    FILE *outptr = fopen(outfile, "w");
    if (outptr == NULL)
    {
        fclose(inptr);
        fprintf(stderr, "Could not create %s.\n", outfile);
        return 3;
    }

    // read infile's BITMAPFILEHEADER
    BITMAPFILEHEADER bf;
    fread(&bf, sizeof(BITMAPFILEHEADER), 1, inptr);

    // read infile's BITMAPINFOHEADER
    BITMAPINFOHEADER bi;
    fread(&bi, sizeof(BITMAPINFOHEADER), 1, inptr);

    // ensure infile is (likely) a 24-bit uncompressed BMP 4.0
    if (bf.bfType != 0x4d42 || bf.bfOffBits != 54 || bi.biSize != 40 ||
        bi.biBitCount != 24 || bi.biCompression != 0)
    {
        fclose(outptr);
        fclose(inptr);
        fprintf(stderr, "Unsupported file format.\n");
        return 4;
    }
BITMAPFILEHEADER bf_resize = bf;
BITMAPINFOHEADER bi_resize = bi;
bi_resize.biWidth = bi.biWidth * f;
bi_resize.biHeight = bi.biHeight * f;
int padding_resize = (4 - (bi_resize.biWidth * sizeof(RGBTRIPLE)) % 4) % 4;
bi_resize.biSizeImage = (bi_resize.biWidth * sizeof(RGBTRIPLE) + padding_resize) * abs(bi_resize.biHeight);
bf_resize.bfSize = bi_resize.biSizeImage + sizeof(BITMAPFILEHEADER)+sizeof(BITMAPINFOHEADER);
int padding = (4 - (bi.biWidth * sizeof(RGBTRIPLE)) % 4) % 4;
int fn = f * 10;
int x = 10 / fn;
int diff = x;
diff--;
int w = 0;
int h = 0;

// write outfile's BITMAPFILEHEADER
fwrite(&bf_resize, sizeof(BITMAPFILEHEADER), 1, outptr);

// write outfile's BITMAPINFOHEADER
fwrite(&bi_resize, sizeof(BITMAPINFOHEADER), 1, outptr);

     // iterate over infile's scanlines
       for (int i = 0, biHeight = abs(bi.biHeight); i < biHeight; i++)
    {
        if(h==0){
        // iterate over pixels in scanline
        for (int j = 0; j < bi.biWidth; j++)
        {
            // temporary storage
            RGBTRIPLE triple;

            // read RGB triple from infile
            fread(&triple, sizeof(RGBTRIPLE), 1, inptr);
            if(w==0){
            // write RGB triple to outfile
            fwrite(&triple, sizeof(RGBTRIPLE), 1, outptr);
            w++;
            }
            else{
                w++;
            }
            if(w==diff){
               w=0; 
            }
        }
        }
         h++;
        if(h==diff){
            h=0;
        }
        // skip over padding, if any
        fseek(inptr, padding, SEEK_CUR);

        // then add it back (to demonstrate how)
        for (int k = 0; k < padding; k++)
        {
            fputc(0x00, outptr);
        }
    }
    // close infile
    fclose(inptr);

    // close outfile
    fclose(outptr);

    // success
    return 0;
}
14
  • 1
    "I need some help with resizing the BMP image" gives no information to us. Please be specific about your problem. You can at least post your original image and the result (may be collapsed) image to demonstrate your problem. In addition, you are encouraged to post fully compilable (but minimum) code including the definitions of the structs. It may be a good approach to limit the code after the pixels are mapped into memory. Then we can be free from its file format, bmp or ppm or whatever.
    – tshiono
    Jan 17 at 13:00
  • BTW what kind of interpolation filter are you going to apply? A cubic filter, bilinear, or the nearest neighborhood?
    – tshiono
    Jan 17 at 13:00
  • 1
    Thank you for the update. I may have understood your problem (just by viewing the provided images, not examining your code, so far). When we resize an image, the detail will be blurred or lost especially when shrinking the image. It is the natural result due to the sampling theory and the frequency response of the interpolation filter. Then it is no wonder that the very small (possibly one pixel?) white dot in the center will visually disappear.
    – tshiono
    Jan 17 at 14:11
  • 1
    I suppose I have posted an answer with my code to solve your problem several days before. I have no idea why it has disappeared.
    – tshiono
    Jan 22 at 12:19
  • 1
    I have posted my answer. Hope it helps.
    – tshiono
    Jan 23 at 22:38

1 Answer 1

2
+50

I assume you want to shrink the image by skipping rows and columns using the variables w, h, and diff. For instance, if we set the scaling factor f to 0.5, diff is assigned to 1, and every other rows/columns will be skipped to scale the image by 0.5x. Then there are two crutial issues in the loop with i and j:

  • You are resetting w in if(w==diff){ w=0; } just after w++;. Then w keeps being 0 and no columns are skipped.
  • You are putting the if(h==0){ condition in outer block. Then the pixels are not read while h==0. In order to shrink the image, you need to keep on reading every pixels regardless of the condition, and write the pixel if the conditions meet.

Then the loop will be improved as:

    // iterate over infile's scanlines
    for (int i = 0, biHeight = abs(bi.biHeight); i < biHeight; i++) {
        // iterate over pixels in scanline
        for (int j = 0; j < bi.biWidth; j++) {
            // temporary storage
            RGBTRIPLE triple;

            // read RGB triple from infile
            fread(&triple, sizeof(RGBTRIPLE), 1, inptr);
            if (w == 0 && h == 0) {
                // write RGB triple to outfile
                fwrite(&triple, sizeof(RGBTRIPLE), 1, outptr);
            }
            w++;
            if (w > diff){
               w = 0;
            }
        }
        // skip over padding, if any
        fseek(inptr, padding, SEEK_CUR);

        // padding to the output file, if any
        if (h == 0) {
            for (int k = 0; k < padding_resize; k++) {
                fputc(0x00, outptr);
            }
        }

        h++;
        if (h > diff){
            h = 0;
        }
    }

It will work under limited conditions: f=0.5 and the image width and height are even numbers. But in general conditions it still does not work well. For instance, if we set f to 0.4, bi_resize.biWidth and bi_resize.biHeight will be calculated with multiplying original size by 0.4, while diff will be calculated to 1. Then they cause conflicts between the header information and the actual pixels.

Here is another hint to solve the problems:

  • The common approach to manipulate image is to store the entire pixels into the memory at first. Then you can random-access any pixels in the following process and the code will be more straightforward. Basic idea is to iterate over the destination coordinates and retroject back to the coordinates of the source image to pick the pixel values.
  • Your posted input image is too small to identify the problem, because thin lines and small dots are easily collapsed just with filtering even if the algorithm is appropriate. Better to use larger images to evaluate.

Here is my rewrite based on your code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

#include "bmp.h"

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    // ensure proper usage
    if (argc != 4) {
        fprintf(stderr, "Usage: resize n infile outfile\n");
        return 1;
    }

    // read the scaling factor
    float f = atof(argv[1]);
    if (f <= 0 || f > 1) {
        fprintf(stderr, "f, the resize factor, must be between 0 and 1.\n");
        return 1;
    }
    char *infile = argv[2];
    char *outfile = argv[3];

    // open input file
    FILE *inptr = fopen(infile, "r");
    if (inptr == NULL) {
        fprintf(stderr, "Could not open %s.\n", infile);
        return 2;
    }

    // open output file
    FILE *outptr = fopen(outfile, "w");
    if (outptr == NULL) {
        fclose(inptr);
        fprintf(stderr, "Could not create %s.\n", outfile);
        return 3;
    }

    // read infile's BITMAPFILEHEADER
    BITMAPFILEHEADER bf;
    fread(&bf, sizeof(BITMAPFILEHEADER), 1, inptr);

    // read infile's BITMAPINFOHEADER
    BITMAPINFOHEADER bi;
    fread(&bi, sizeof(BITMAPINFOHEADER), 1, inptr);

    // ensure infile is (likely) a 24-bit uncompressed BMP 4.0
    if (bf.bfType != 0x4d42 || bf.bfOffBits != 54 || bi.biSize != 40 ||
        bi.biBitCount != 24 || bi.biCompression != 0) {
        fclose(outptr);
        fclose(inptr);
        fprintf(stderr, "Unsupported file format.\n");
        return 4;
    }

    BITMAPFILEHEADER bf_resize = bf;
    BITMAPINFOHEADER bi_resize = bi;
    bi_resize.biWidth = bi.biWidth * f;
    bi_resize.biHeight = bi.biHeight * f;
    int padding = bi.biWidth % 4;       // you can simplify the calculation
    int padding_resize = bi_resize.biWidth % 4;
    bi_resize.biSizeImage = (bi_resize.biWidth * sizeof(RGBTRIPLE) + padding_resize) * bi_resize.biHeight;
    bf_resize.bfSize = bi_resize.biSizeImage + sizeof(BITMAPFILEHEADER) + sizeof(BITMAPINFOHEADER);

    // allocate mamory for the rgb triplets of the original (input) image
    RGBTRIPLE *pix = malloc(sizeof(RGBTRIPLE) * bi.biWidth * bi.biHeight);
    if (pix == NULL) {
        fprintf(stderr, "malloc failed.\n");
        return 5;
    }
    // temporary storage
    RGBTRIPLE triple;

    // read the entire pixels of the original image and store into the memory
    for (int i = 0; i < bi.biHeight; i++) {
        for (int j = 0; j < bi.biWidth; j++) {
            fread(&triple, sizeof(RGBTRIPLE), 1, inptr);
            pix[i * bi.biWidth + j] = triple;
        }
        // skip over padding, if any
        fseek(inptr, padding, SEEK_CUR);
    }

    // write outfile's header
    fwrite(&bf_resize, sizeof(BITMAPFILEHEADER), 1, outptr);
    fwrite(&bi_resize, sizeof(BITMAPINFOHEADER), 1, outptr);

    // write the pixels of destination (resized) image
    for (int i = 0; i < bi_resize.biHeight; i++) {
        for (int j = 0; j < bi_resize.biWidth; j++) {
            // calculate the corresponding coorinates in the original image
            int m = (i / f + 0.5);              // +0.5 for rounding
            if (m > bi.biHeight - 1) {          // limit the value
                m = bi.biHeight - 1;
            }
            int n = (j / f + 0.5);
            if (n > bi.biWidth - 1) {
                n = bi.biWidth - 1;
            }
            // pick the pixel value at the coordinate
            triple = pix[m * bi.biWidth + n];
            // write RGB triplet to outfile
            fwrite(&triple, sizeof(RGBTRIPLE), 1, outptr);
        }
        // padding for the output image, if any
        for (int j = 0; j < padding_resize; j++) {
            fputc(0x00, outptr);
        }
    }
    free(pix);
    fclose(inptr);
    fclose(outptr);

    return 0;
}

Input image: enter image description here Output image with f=0.4: enter image description here

4
  • Another problem it has the previous code was making x=(int)1/f, for numbers between 0.501 and 0.999 it will always give x=1.
    – SergioR
    Jan 23 at 23:33
  • @SergioR thank you for the comment. It should be one of the causes of the problem, but the improvement by fixing it may be limited.
    – tshiono
    Jan 23 at 23:46
  • 1
    indeed. It's also worth noting that the original code opened the file as plain text instead of binary.
    – SergioR
    Jan 23 at 23:54
  • 1
    @SergioR it depends on the platform. Adding "b" option is mandatory only for Windows based system. It may be a safe bet to always append it considering the cross-platform interoperability anyway. (Although I do not :).
    – tshiono
    Jan 24 at 0:13

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