0

function myFunction() {
    if(rock == true){console.log("dd")}
}
    <div class="overview">
        <div class="userSide">
            <h4>User:</h4><span> </span>
            <img id="userImg" src="img/Paper.png" style="width: 220px; height: 220px;">
        </div>
        <div class="compSide">
            <h4>CPU:</h4><span> </span>
            <img id="compImg" src="img/Paper.png" style="width: 220px; height: 220px;">
        </div>
    </div>
    <div class="userBTN">
        <button id="rock" onclick="myFunction()">Rock</button>
        <button id="paper" onclick="myFunction()">Paper</button>
        <button id="scissors" onclick="myFunction()">Scissors</button>
    </div>
I have one function on 3 buttons and want the function to analyze which button was clicked than perform a task. Is this possible or do I have to add 3 separate functions?

4 Answers 4

4

One easy way... make your function take an argument like:

function myFunction(whichOne) {
    if(whichOne == "rock"){console.log("dd")}
}

and then call each with the right value:

<div class="userBTN">
    <button id="rock" onclick="myFunction('rock')">Rock</button>
    <button id="paper" onclick="myFunction('paper')">Paper</button>
    <button id="scissors" onclick="myFunction('scissors')">Scissors</button>
</div>
1
  • 1
    Also, the handler could take the event and determine who called it based on event.target.id, then you wouldn't have to hard code what the DOM element is already discussing Jan 17, 2022 at 21:17
0

add a data-attribute.

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Learn/HTML/Howto/Use_data_attributes

<button data-name="rock" id="rock" onclick="myFunction">rock</button>

...

and you can check if selected with:


function myFunction(event) { 
if (event.target.dataset.name === "rock") {

       // do something......
  }
}

Or you could check for it's ID.

if (event.target.id === 'rock') {

// do something

}

But it looks semantically more clean if you give it a data attribute if you look at the HTML file.

0

You can do it this way

var id =""
function myFunction() {

    if(event.target.id == "rock"){alert("rock")}
  if(event.target.id == "paper"){alert("paper")}
  if(event.target.id == "scissors"){alert("scissors")}
}
<div class="overview">
        <div class="userSide">
            <h4>User:</h4><span> </span>
            <img id="userImg" src="img/Paper.png" style="width: 220px; height: 220px;">
        </div>
        <div class="compSide">
            <h4>CPU:</h4><span> </span>
            <img id="compImg" src="img/Paper.png" style="width: 220px; height: 220px;">
        </div>
    </div>
    <div class="userBTN">
        <button id="rock" onclick="myFunction()">Rock</button>
        <button id="paper" onclick="myFunction()">Paper</button>
        <button id="scissors" onclick="myFunction()">Scissors</button>
    </div>

2
  • 1
    you can just pass the id to the function or even better use event.target.id to determine the element that had triggered the event.
    – F. Müller
    Jan 17, 2022 at 21:22
  • I changed it now. Jan 17, 2022 at 21:26
0

Solution

You could do it like the following:

window.onload = () => {
  const clickHandler = (e) => {
    switch (e.target.dataset.rps) {
      case "rock":
        console.log('🗿');
        break;
      case "paper":
        console.log('📃');
        break;
      case "scissors":
        console.log('✂️');
        break;
      default:
        console.log('undefined');
    }
  };
  document.querySelectorAll('button[data-rps]').forEach(it => it.addEventListener('click', clickHandler));
}
<div class="userBTN">
  <button data-rps="rock">Rock</button>
  <button data-rps="paper">Paper</button>
  <button data-rps="scissors">Scissors</button>
</div>

data-attribute vs id

I feel working with the data-attribute instead of the id is better when working with this kind of functionality. Because you are not limited to a specific id. Basically, you could copy that component and place it somewhere else and it would still work.

In this specific case, you only have to manage 3 ids, but if you want to extend functionality it is easy to quickly add another data-attribute instead (in general) and you don't have to rebuild the logic, because it uses the same dataset again.

Besides, you can avoid adding the onClick handler three times and use a more general selector to produce clean html and avoid boilerplate code.

The provided data-attribute data-rps can then be used to determine the type.

using the onclick-event

e.target refers to the event target, which is the element that has triggered the onClick-event.

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