5

I originally asked this question in data.table forum, and received some good answers but I hope to find a less-than-a-sec solution (real data dims 3M x 303)

The link to my post in R community, and MWE in julia (using DataFrames.jl if I am using wrong packages please let me know)

julia> using DataFrames

julia> df = DataFrame(v1 = [1.0,2.1,3.0], v2 = [1,3,3], v3 = [missing,2.1,3.0])
3×3 DataFrame
 Row │ v1       v2     v3
     │ Float64  Int64  Float64?
─────┼───────────────────────────
   1 │     1.0      1  missing
   2 │     2.1      3        2.1
   3 │     3.0      3        3.0

julia> desired = [true,false,true]
3-element Vector{Bool}:
 1
 0
 1

6 Answers 6

9

In Julia using a matrix for such operation, similarly to R, is also natural:

julia> using BenchmarkTools

julia> function helper(x)
           nonempty = false
           local fv
           for v in x
               if !ismissing(v)
                   if nonempty
                       v == fv || return false
                   else
                       fv = v
                       nonempty = true
                   end
               end
           end
           return true
       end
helper (generic function with 1 method)

julia> mat = rand([1, 2, missing], 3_000_000, 303);

julia> @benchmark helper.(eachrow($mat))
BenchmarkTools.Trial: 34 samples with 1 evaluation.
 Range (min … max):  139.440 ms … 154.628 ms  ┊ GC (min … max): 5.74% … 5.15%
 Time  (median):     147.890 ms               ┊ GC (median):    5.27%        
 Time  (mean ± σ):   147.876 ms ±   3.114 ms  ┊ GC (mean ± σ):  5.23% ± 0.95%

                    ▃    ▃   ▃  ▃  ██ ▃
  ▇▁▁▁▁▁▁▁▁▁▇▁▁▁▁▁▁▁█▁▁▁▁█▇▇▇█▁▁█▇▁██▇█▁▇▁▇▇▁▇▇▁▇▁▇▇▇▁▁▁▁▇▁▁▁▁▇ ▁
  139 ms           Histogram: frequency by time          155 ms <

 Memory estimate: 114.80 MiB, allocs estimate: 6.

The operation can be also done in DataFrames.jl, here is an example how to do it:

julia> function helper2(x, i)
           nonempty = false
           local fv
           for v in x
               vv = v[i]
               if !ismissing(vv)
                   if nonempty
                       vv == fv || return false
                   else
                       fv = vv
                       nonempty = true
                   end
               end
           end
           return true
       end
helper2 (generic function with 1 method)

julia> df = DataFrame(mat, :auto, copycols=false); # copycols to avoid copying as data is large

julia> @benchmark helper2.(Ref(identity.(eachcol($df))), 1:nrow($df))
BenchmarkTools.Trial: 46 samples with 1 evaluation.
 Range (min … max):  105.265 ms … 123.345 ms  ┊ GC (min … max): 0.00% … 0.00%
 Time  (median):     110.682 ms               ┊ GC (median):    0.00%
 Time  (mean ± σ):   110.581 ms ±   2.692 ms  ┊ GC (mean ± σ):  0.00% ± 0.00%

                ▄ ▂ ▄█▂
  ▄▁▁▄▄▁▁▆▄▁▁▁▆▆█▄█▆███▄▄▁█▄▁▁▁▁▁▁▁▁▁▁▁▄▁▁▁▁▁▁▁▁▁▁▁▁▁▁▁▁▁▁▁▁▁▁▄ ▁
  105 ms           Histogram: frequency by time          123 ms <

 Memory estimate: 385.28 KiB, allocs estimate: 15.

(if anything in the code is not clear please let me know and I can explain)


EDIT

If you a small union of unique eltypes do:

helper2.(Ref(collect(Union{unique(typeof.(eachcol(df)))...}, eachcol(df))), 1:nrow(df))

If Union{unique(typeof.(eachcol(df)))...} is not a small collection then another solution would be better so please comment if this is good enough for you.

13
  • As I mentioned above the data structure isn't really a matrix, it is a non-homogeneous list of vectors (abstractvector of vectors in julian terminology), MWE is just to illustrate the problem. Jan 18 at 7:42
  • do you have a 3_000_000 element vector of 303 element vectors or a 303 element vector of 3_000_000 element vectors? In the first case use the first solution. In the second case use the second one (a syntax would need to be minimally changed but in general the same pattern should be used). If you update your question with a concrete data structure you use I will be able to update my answer. Jan 18 at 7:48
  • 3
    This signals that there is a significant heterogenity in your source columns eltype. This is something that was not present in your original question. Since you are asking for "most efficient" code the exact characteristic of data matters a lot - I optimized the code for data you shared. I would recommend you to update your question with the data for which you want to get the most efficient code. Then I can update my answer. Jan 18 at 10:03
  • 1
    I have updated the answer for the case of small union mixing floats and ints. On my computer it runs in around 116.094 ms. Jan 18 at 12:28
  • 1
    @BogumiłKamiński FYI, based on my discussion with OP, the dataset has 30-70% rows with identical values. I guess that's the bottleneck. Faster solutions likely require parallelism.
    – ekoam
    Jan 19 at 5:28
2

Structure matters. Here is a matrix approach in R, using the matrixStats package (source), which ships optimized matrix functions implemented in C.

x = sample.int(3, size = 303*3e6, replace = T)            
m = matrix(x, ncol = 303, byrow = T)
bench::mark(
  var = matrixStats::rowVars(m, na.rm = T) == 0
)

On my (certainly not high performance) machine this takes roughly 3.5 seconds for a 3 million row matrix.

2
  • but my data structure isn't really a matrix, and converting it to a matrix isn't very efficient. Jan 18 at 7:39
  • In original post some answers showed up using as.matrix, however, this is not cost effective. remember as.matrix needs to make an extra copy of data frame. Jan 18 at 8:38
2

Do you have about 350MB of RAM available? If so, you can try this function

rowequal <- function(x) {
  undetermined <- function(x, can_del) {
    if (length(can_del) < 1L)
      return(x)
    x[-can_del]
  }
  if (ncol(x) < 1L)
    return(logical())
  out <- logical(nrow(x))
  if (ncol(x) < 2L)
    return(!out)
  x1 <- x[[1L]]
  need_compare <- undetermined(seq_len(nrow(x)), which(x1 != x[[2L]]))
  x1[nas] <- x[[2L]][nas <- which(is.na(x1))]
  if (ncol(x) > 2L) {
    for (j in 3:ncol(x)) {
      need_compare <- undetermined(
        need_compare, which(x1[need_compare] != x[[j]][need_compare])
      )
      x1[nas] <- x[[j]][nas <- which(is.na(x1))]
      if (length(need_compare) < 1L)
        return(out)
    }
  }
  `[<-`(out, need_compare, TRUE)
}

Below is the benchmark

> dim(d)
[1] 3000000     300
> bench::mark(f(d), rowequal(d), iterations = 10)
# A tibble: 2 x 13
  expression       min   median `itr/sec` mem_alloc `gc/sec` n_itr  n_gc total_time result memory time  gc   
  <bch:expr>  <bch:tm> <bch:tm>     <dbl> <bch:byt>    <dbl> <int> <dbl>   <bch:tm> <list> <list> <lis> <lis>
1 f(d)           2.97s    2.98s     0.335    34.4MB        0    10     0      29.8s <lgl ~ <Rpro~ <ben~ <tib~
2 rowequal(d)  88.52ms  93.34ms    10.7     352.2MB        0    10     0    932.5ms <lgl ~ <Rpro~ <ben~ <tib~

, where f (I got this from this post) and d are

f <- function(x) {
  v1 = do.call(pmin, c(x, na.rm = TRUE))
  v2 = do.call(pmax, c(x, na.rm = TRUE))
  v1 == v2
}

mkDT <- function(rows, cols, type = as.integer) {
  data.table::setDT(
    replicate(cols, sample(type(c(1:10, NA)), rows, replace = TRUE), simplify = FALSE)
  )
}

d <- mkDT(3e6, 300)

An Rcpp version of the code. It could achieve its best performance (in terms of both memory usage and speed) if you can ensure that all the columns in your dataframe are of the numeric type. I guess this is the most efficient solution to your problem (in R).

rowequalcpp <- function(x) {
  if (ncol(x) < 1L)
    return(logical())
  out <- logical(nrow(x))
  if (ncol(x) < 2L)
    return(!out)
  mark_equal(out, x)
  out
}

Rcpp::sourceCpp(code = '
#include <Rcpp.h>

// [[Rcpp::export]]
void mark_equal(Rcpp::LogicalVector& res, const Rcpp::DataFrame& df) {
  Rcpp::NumericVector x1 = df[0];
  int n = df.nrows();
  int need_compare[n];
  for (int i = 0; i < n; ++i)
    need_compare[i] = i;
  for (int j = 1; j < df.length(); ++j) {
    Rcpp::NumericVector dfj = df[j];
    for (int i = 0; i < n; ) {
      int itmp = need_compare[i];
      if (Rcpp::NumericVector::is_na(x1[itmp]))
        x1[itmp] = dfj[itmp];
      if (!Rcpp::NumericVector::is_na(dfj[itmp]) && x1[itmp] != dfj[itmp]) {
        need_compare[i] = need_compare[n - 1];
        need_compare[n-- - 1] = itmp;
      } else
        ++i;
    }
    if (n < 1)
      return;
  }
  for (int i = 0; i < n; ++i)
    res[need_compare[i]] = TRUE;
}
')

Benchmark (the type of your columns are crucial for the performance):

> d <- mkDT(3000000, 300, as.integer)
> bench::mark(rowequal(d), rowequalcpp(d), iterations = 10)
# A tibble: 2 x 13
  expression        min  median `itr/sec` mem_alloc `gc/sec` n_itr  n_gc total_time result memory time  gc   
  <bch:expr>     <bch:> <bch:t>     <dbl> <bch:byt>    <dbl> <int> <dbl>   <bch:tm> <list> <list> <lis> <lis>
1 rowequal(d)     100ms   147ms      7.07     398MB     3.03     7     3      991ms <lgl ~ <Rpro~ <ben~ <tib~
2 rowequalcpp(d)  101ms   102ms      9.35     309MB     2.34     8     2      855ms <lgl ~ <Rpro~ <ben~ <tib~
> d <- mkDT(3000000, 300, as.numeric)
> bench::mark(rowequal(d), rowequalcpp(d), iterations = 10)
# A tibble: 2 x 13
  expression          min   median `itr/sec` mem_alloc `gc/sec` n_itr  n_gc total_time result  memory   time 
  <bch:expr>     <bch:tm> <bch:tm>     <dbl> <bch:byt>    <dbl> <int> <dbl>   <bch:tm> <list>  <list>   <lis>
1 rowequal(d)     103.7ms  110.8ms      8.05   349.3MB    0.895     9     1      1.12s <lgl [~ <Rprofm~ <ben~
2 rowequalcpp(d)   26.3ms   27.3ms     36.3     11.4MB    0        10     0    275.2ms <lgl [~ <Rprofm~ <ben~
# ... with 1 more variable: gc <list>
12
  • rowequal is about 18 seconds, rowequalcpp is 1.9 seconds on my real data. rowequalcpp works fine for for the first row, but return false for other rows. Jan 18 at 9:28
  • @هنروقتان Hi, there is a bug in the code. I have corrected it. Try the updated one.
    – ekoam
    Jan 18 at 10:10
  • thanks for your update, it produces the right answer, but the new version took 10.4 seconds. is it expected? Jan 18 at 10:26
  • Interesting benchmarking result, upvoted! Jan 18 at 10:31
  • @هنروقتان Yes. The old version skipped some operations unexpectedly. Also, based on your update, your columns are not all of the same numeric type. This makes the code slower cuz I wrote it based on that assumption. Perhaps it can be further optimized to account for this. But first, is it possible for you to convert the dataframe into all numerics?
    – ekoam
    Jan 18 at 10:50
0

A quick update about this question, I manage to reduce the time to about 2 seconds (less than 3 MiB memory usage!) using the following functions, no parallelism is used yet: (the magic is in using @.)

julia> f(x,y) = ismissing(x) || ismissing(y) ? true : x == y

julia> function rowequal(df, cols)
           res=ones(Bool, nrow(df))
           for i in 2:length(cols)
               @. res &= ifelse(f(df[!, cols[i-1]], df[!,cols[i]]), true, false)
           end
           res
       end
0

Another update on this, Now I am able to reduce the time to under a second (in fact under 0.5 second) using InMemoryDatasets, thanks to this discussion in Julia lang discourse.

julia> using InMemoryDatasets
julia> df = Dataset(df)
julia> f(x,y) = ismissing(x) || ismissing(y) ? true : x == y
julia> byrow(df, isless, [:v1, :v2, :v3], with = byrow(df, coalesce, :), lt = f)

Update

with the new update from the discourse discussion I am able to almost half the previous insane record :D, i.e. 0.27 (Julia community really loves SPEED)

julia> byrow(df, issorted, [:v1, :v2, :v3], lt = !f)
-3

I suggest you to use python, it has two great products for this, pandas the most popular data frame library and polars the fastest data frame library in the world! (db-benchmark).

import time
t1=time.time();df.max(axis=1)==df.min(axis=1);t2=time.time()
1
  • thanks for your suggestion. I am aware of pandas and polars. They are good products, no doubt, but, the exact website you mentioned in your post, suggests that I shouldn't use pandas if performance is the high priority and I shouldn't use polars if efficiency is the high priority, AND, I should use data.table if I am looking for speed and efficiency! PS your answer took about 6 seconds, but I am not sure pandas is as good as this for the rest of workflow. polars took 28 seconds. Jan 19 at 4:27

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