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I used a function in Python/Numpy to solve a problem in combinatorial game theory.

import numpy as np
from time import time

def problem(c):
    start = time()
    N = np.array([0, 0])
    U = np.arange(c)
    
    for _ in U:
        bits = np.bitwise_xor(N[:-1], N[-2::-1])
        N = np.append(N, np.setdiff1d(U, bits).min())

    return len(*np.where(N==0)), time()-start 

problem(10000)

Then I wrote it in Julia because I thought it'd be faster due to Julia using just-in-time compilation.

function problem(c)
    N = [0]
    U = Vector(0:c)
    
    for _ in U
        elems = N[1:length(N)-1]
        bits = elems .⊻ reverse(elems)
        push!(N, minimum(setdiff(U, bits))) 
    end
    
    return sum(N .== 0)
end

@time problem(10000)

But the second version was much slower. For c = 10000, the Python version takes 2.5 sec. on an Core i5 processor and the Julia version takes 4.5 sec. Since Numpy operations are implemented in C, I'm wondering if Python is indeed faster or if I'm writing a function with wasted time complexity.

The implementation in Julia allocates a lot of memory. How to reduce the number of allocations to improve its performance?

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  • 7
    Asking yourself "is language X faster than language Y?" is usually a red herring. Aside from technicalities such as different implementations, most languages aren't used "pure" – like your Python program calling into compiled languages' code via numpy – and there's no free lunch: a JIT gains long-term performance at the cost of short-term warmup. Your specific program in Julia is slower than your specific program in Python. Jan 19 at 6:45
  • 1
    Extrapolating "Is X better then Y" from 1 datapoint is kinda dangerous, don't you think? Jan 19 at 6:47
  • 1
    I don't think this should be closed. it needs some editing, but the specific comparison is on topic. Jan 19 at 6:54
  • 8
    The code in Julia is not written efficiently. The major inefficiency is that it makes a lot of data copying and allocations (note that in Python indexing creates a view as opposed to Julia where you have to opt-in for this). I have re-written it to get around 40x speed improvement in Julia execution time. I have edited the question to reflect this and voted to re-open Jan 19 at 7:22
  • 2
    Performance of setdiff could be different between Python and Julia, but I do not see why Julia should be slower here - this is a basic library function that is likely optimized. If it is then it should be fixed in Julia. I do not have Python installed on my current machine to make a benchmark. On the other hand it was clear from the original code that it was making unnecessary allocations in several places thus my comment. Jan 19 at 8:31

1 Answer 1

15

The original code can be re-written in the following way:

function problem2(c)
    N = zeros(Int, c+2)
    notseen = falses(c+1)

    for lN in 1:c+1
        notseen .= true
        @inbounds for i in 1:lN-1
            b = N[i] ⊻ N[lN-i]
            b <= c && (notseen[b+1] = false)
        end
        idx = findfirst(notseen)
        isnothing(idx) || (N[lN+1] = idx-1)
    end
    return count(==(0), N)
end

First check if the functions produce the same results:

julia> problem(10000), problem2(10000)
(1475, 1475)

(I have also checked that the generated N vector is identical)

Now let us benchmark both functions:

julia> using BenchmarkTools

julia> @btime problem(10000)
  4.938 s (163884 allocations: 3.25 GiB)
1475

julia> @btime problem2(10000)
  76.275 ms (4 allocations: 79.59 KiB)
1475

So it turns out to be over 60x faster.

What I do to improve the performance is avoiding allocations. In Julia it is easy and efficient. If any part of the code is not clear please comment. Note that I concentrated on showing how to improve the performance of Julia code (and not trying to just replicate the Python code, since - as it was commented under the original post - doing language performance comparisons is very tricky). I think it is better to concentrate in this discussion on how to make Julia code fast.


EDIT

Indeed changing to Vector{Bool} and removing the condition on b and c relation (which mathematically holds for these values of c) gives a better speed:

julia> function problem3(c)
           N = zeros(Int, c+2)
           notseen = Vector{Bool}(undef, c+1)

           for lN in 1:c+1
               notseen .= true
               @inbounds for i in 1:lN-1
                   b = N[i] ⊻ N[lN-i]
                   notseen[b+1] = false
               end
               idx = findfirst(notseen)
               isnothing(idx) || (N[lN+1] = idx-1)
           end
           return count(==(0), N)
       end
problem3 (generic function with 1 method)

julia> @btime problem3(10000)
  20.714 ms (3 allocations: 88.17 KiB)
1475
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    The for i in 1:lN-1 loop would have to be written in e.g. Numba or Cython. I do not think it is easily doable in Python (but I might be wrong). Jan 19 at 7:52
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    I don't mean necessarily rewritten the exact same way, and am more interested in a version with just NumPy. I just think the setdiff takes most of the time and it could be replaced similarly (but still with NumPy operations). Jan 19 at 8:11
  • 1
    notseen[b+1] = (b > c) && notseen[b+1] moves the branch, maybe making this slightly faster. Jan 19 at 8:34
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    Ha! Using notseen = fill(false, c+1) allows you to use notseen[b+1] = (b > c) & notseen[b+1] without the overhead from bit twiddling, cutting the time in half at only slight memory overhead. Jan 19 at 8:42
  • 2
    On my laptop: python: 2.6 sec, julia: problem: 4.4 sec, problem2: 0.09, problem3: 0.04
    – Antonello
    Jan 19 at 13:25

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