15

I want to eliminate consecutive duplicates from a string like f "aaabbbcccdeefgggg" = "abcdefg"

This is my code

f :: String -> String
f "" = ""
f "_" = "_"
f (x : xs : xss)
    | x == xs   = f (xs : xss)
    | otherwise = x : f (xs : xss)

I got as error non-exhaustive patterns, I think it's from second line, the program doesn't know how to deal when it's only 1 char left. How should I fix it?

6
  • 2
    What is f "_" = "_" supposed to do?
    – michid
    Jan 19 at 10:08
  • 2
    You only process one particula single-char string, there are more of them.
    – bipll
    Jan 19 at 10:09
  • 6
    "_" matches the literal string "_". I guess what you want is [x] to match a singleton list.
    – michid
    Jan 19 at 10:10
  • 2
    Then change it to f [c] = [c] Jan 19 at 10:10
  • 2
    I believe the issue is best summarized as follows: the pattern "a" is a shorthand for the pattern ['a'] (or 'a':[]) where 'a' is a character literal -- this is not the same pattern as [a] (or a:[]) where a here is a variable name. In your case, you have the character literal '_' vs the wildcard pattern _, but the principle is the same -- these are distinct constructs.
    – chi
    Jan 19 at 18:07

5 Answers 5

26

The "_" pattern does not match a string with any character, it matches the string that contains an underscore.

You can use [_] as pattern for the singleton string, so:

f :: String -> String
f "" = ""
f s@[_] = s
f (x : xs : xss)
    | x == xs   = f (xs : xss)
    | otherwise = x : f (xs : xss)

here we use s@ to capture the string with one character as s.

or we can simplify this with:

f :: String -> String
f (x : xs : xss)
    | x == xs   = f (xs : xss)
    | otherwise = x : f (xs : xss)
f s = s
18

I want to eliminate consecutive duplicates from a string like f "aaabbbcccdeefgggg" = "abcdefg"

You can just group the letters which are equal (via Data.List.group), and then take the first of each group (via map head, which applies head to each element of the list and gives you back the list of the results):

import Data.List (group) -- so we write group instead of Data.List.group
map head $ group "aaabbbcccdeefgggg"

This can be seen as the application of map head after the application of group to the input String. Therefore, your f can be defined like the composition of those two functions:

f :: String -> String
f = map head . group

For completeness, as you seem to be new to Haskell, here are a few details:

  • Data.List.group "aaabbbcccdeefgggg" returns ["aaa","bbb","ccc","d","ee","f","gggg"];
  • f $ a b c is the same as f (a b c);
  • . is the composition operator, and it is such that (f . g) x == f (g x).
0
9

Or you can make it even simpler if you don't handle things that can be left unhandled:

f :: String -> String
f (x:y:xs) | x == y = f (y:xs)
f (x:xs) = x:f xs
f _ = ""
5

To avoid looking ahead further than necessary, you shouldn't try to match on the first two elements. Instead, keep track of the most recent element.

f :: Eq a => [a] -> [a]
f = start
  where
    start [] = []
    start (x : xs) = x : go x xs

    go _old [] = []
    go old (x : xs)
      | x == old
      = go old xs
      | otherwise
      = x : go x xs

If you want, you can also write this as a fold, where you track whether you've seen an element yet using a Maybe:

f :: Eq a => [a] -> [a]
f xs = foldr go stop xs Nothing
  where
    stop _ = []
    go x r (Just old)
      | x == old = r (Just old)
    go x r _ = x : r (Just x)

Some may find the fold easier to read if it's rearranged a bit.

f :: Eq a => [a] -> [a]
f xs = (foldr go stop xs) Nothing
  where
    stop :: Maybe a -> [a]
    stop = \_ -> []

    go :: a -> (Maybe a -> [a]) -> (Maybe a -> [a])
    go x r = \acc -> case acc of
      Just old
        | x == old -> r (Just old)
      _ -> x : r (Just x)
17
  • 1
    @WillNess, I like the equals signs to line up with the guard pipes. I guess I got used to that reading GHC code?
    – dfeuer
    Jan 20 at 8:52
  • 1
    @s4seed3sm, I wrote a version that's rearranged a bit. Does that help? If not, can you explain what you find confusing? You should try to "translate" the fold version to the recursive function it represents.
    – dfeuer
    Jan 20 at 8:56
  • 1
    @WillNess, that's true from a clarity standpoint, but not from a list fusion standpoint. Guard it like that and you won't get fusion.
    – dfeuer
    Jan 20 at 17:40
  • 1
    My code optimizes properly when marked INLINABLE and compiled with either -O2 or -O -fspec-constr. See this gist. Fusing on the other side would require build and probably some INLINE fiddling.
    – dfeuer
    Jan 20 at 21:55
  • 1
    @WillNess, your code will not fuse because drop doesn't work with list fusion at all.
    – dfeuer
    Jan 20 at 21:55
3

You also could use foldl. the logic is: comparing the last element of accumulator with current element.

f :: Eq a => [a] -> [a]
f xs = foldl (\x y -> if last x == y then x else x++[y] )  [head xs] xs

here we initiate our accumulator with [head x].

Based on @dfeuer hint I change my solution:

-- with foldl
f :: Eq a => [a] -> [a]
f xs = snd $ foldl  opr (Nothing, []) xs
  where
    opr (Just old, acc) n
      | old == n = (Just old, acc)
      | otherwise = (Just n, acc ++ [n])
    opr (Nothing, acc) n = (Just n, acc ++ [n])
-- with foldr
f2 :: Eq a =>[a] -> [a]
f2 xs = snd $ foldr opr (Nothing, []) xs
  where
    opr n (Just old, acc)
      | old == n = (Just old, acc)
      | otherwise = (Just n, n:acc)
    opr n (Nothing, acc) = (Just n, n:acc)

Thanks to @dfeuer, I learned a lot of new things. This is the third version based on comments:

-- with foldl
f :: Eq a => [a] -> [a]
f xs = snd $ foldl opr (Nothing, []) xs
  where
    opr (old, acc) n =
      ( Just n,
        case old of
          Just o
            | o == n -> acc
            | otherwise -> acc ++ [n]
          Nothing -> acc ++ [n]
      )
-- with foldr
f :: Eq a => [a] -> [a]
f xs = snd $ foldr opr (Nothing, []) xs
  where
    opr n (old, acc) =
      ( Just n,
        case old of
          Just o
            | o == n -> acc
            | otherwise -> n : acc
          Nothing -> n : acc
      )
5
  • 4
    Can you see why that would be needlessly strict and hideously inefficient? Using partial functions like head and last when you don't need to is also frowned upon. An interesting challenge for you: write an efficient, lazy version using foldr instead of foldl. Hint: define appropriate go and stop to fill in the blanks in this definition: f :: Eq a => [a] -> [a]; f xs = foldr _go _stop xs Nothing. Yes, passing four arguments to foldr is intentional.
    – dfeuer
    Jan 20 at 2:26
  • The second version is much less inefficient, and much cleaner. Nice work! It's still too strict, which will lead to garbage collection inefficiency for lists that aren't pretty short.
    – dfeuer
    Jan 20 at 9:10
  • 1
    You can make your second version properly lazy using the fact that the result "shapes" are always the same, and the fact that in the first case old = n. Can you see how?
    – dfeuer
    Jan 20 at 9:14
  • 1
    Try it first. Then check against this: gist.github.com/treeowl/a864c00e3ba5b9662c200307413ac918
    – dfeuer
    Jan 20 at 9:31
  • Never mind, I don't think that modification is enough....
    – dfeuer
    Jan 20 at 14:25

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy