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As I am writing a cross-platform application, I want my code to work on both platforms.

In Windows, I use this code to compare 2 single characters.

for( int i = 0;  i < str.size();  i++ )
    if( str.substr( i, 1 ) == std::string( "¶" ) )
        printf( "Found!\n" );

Now, in Linux, the character is not found. It is found when I change the substring to a length of 2.

for( int i = 0;  i < str.size();  i++ )
    if( str.substr( i, 2 ) == std::string( "¶" ) )
        printf( "Found!\n" );

How do convert this character comparison code to be cross platform?

9
  • 1
    Which encoding do you use/expect?
    – Jarod42
    Jan 19 at 13:38
  • I'm not sure, I didn't set any specifically. But I guess UTF-8 would be sufficient?
    – Z0q
    Jan 19 at 13:39
  • Ensure your code has appropriate encoding. How do you feed str?
    – Jarod42
    Jan 19 at 13:41
  • Do not tag C for C++ questions. Jan 19 at 13:45
  • @EricPostpischil Well, initially I wanted to compare char to wchar_t. But I converted into std::strings. So I use both
    – Z0q
    Jan 19 at 14:14

1 Answer 1

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Solved using str.compare() and size() of character string:

std::string str = "Some string ¶ some text ¶ to see";
std::string char_to_compare = "¶";

for( int i = 0;  i < str.size();  i++ )
    if( str.compare( i, char_to_compare.size(), char_to_compare ) == 0 )
        printf( "Found!\n" );

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