1

While I was reading code, I found that in the KeyDown event you can set Key := 0; to stop processing the event any further. For example: TIncrementalForm.FormKeyDown is coded as:

procedure TIncrementalForm.FormKeyDown(Sender: TObject; var Key: Word; Shift: TShiftState);
begin
  if Key = VK_RETURN then begin
    Key := 0; // Stop processing by input window
    if Shift = [ssShift] then
      btnPrevClick(nil)
    else
      btnNextClick(nil);
  end;
end;

Another example is from unit FindFrm:

procedure TFindForm.cboFindTextKeyUp(Sender: TObject; var Key: Word; Shift: TShiftState);
begin
  if Key = VK_TAB then begin
    cboFindText.SelText := #9;
    Key := 0; // prevent propagation
  end;
end;

I tested it myself, but it doesn't work:

unit Unit1;

interface

uses
  Winapi.Windows, Winapi.Messages, System.SysUtils, System.Variants, System.Classes, Vcl.Graphics,
  Vcl.Controls, Vcl.Forms, Vcl.Dialogs, Vcl.StdCtrls;

type
  TForm1 = class(TForm)
    Memo1: TMemo;
    Memo2: TMemo;
    Button1: TButton;
    procedure Memo1KeyDown(Sender: TObject; var Key: Word; Shift: TShiftState);
  private const
    VK_X = Ord('X');
  public
    { Public declarations }
  end;

var
  Form1: TForm1;

implementation

{$R *.dfm}

procedure TForm1.Memo1KeyDown(Sender: TObject; var Key: Word; Shift: TShiftState);
begin
  if Key = VK_X then
  begin
    Key := 0;
    Memo2.Lines.Add('yes');
  end;
end;

end.

My intention is: whenever the user holds down the key x in the TMemo control I do some business logic (i.e. add "yes" to the memo) and stop further processing. But the result is that the key x is still inserted to the TMemo text. I want to know how to disable the default key holding down event behavior (inserting the corresponding key).

2 Answers 2

3

The key here (no pun intended) is to use OnKeyPress instead of OnKeyDown:

procedure TForm1.Memo1KeyPress(Sender: TObject; var Key: Char);
begin
  if Key = 'x' then
  begin
    Key := #0;
    Memo1.Lines.Add('yes');
  end;
end;
10
  • KeyPress doesn't have the additional parameter Shift: TShiftState. In my actually code, I need to test the TShiftState value, so I have to use KeyDown event. Is there a way to do it for the KeyDown event? Jan 20 at 9:16
  • @FajelaTajkiya: Which particular modifier key are you interested in? If Shift, this is trivial: Use if Key = 'x' then for X and if Key = 'X' then for Shift+X. Jan 20 at 9:18
  • It's ctrl and ctrl + alt. Jan 20 at 9:20
  • If so, the best approach by far is to drop a TActionList on your form. Double-click it. Create an action, name it aTestAction and set its ShortCut to Ctrl+X. As its OnExecute handler, write Memo1.Lines.Add('yes'). Then try Ctrl+X at runtime. You'll see that your OnExecute is executed and no cutting is done in the memo. That is, Ctrl+X is handled by your action and the poor memo will never even realise that someone pressed Ctrl+X. But beware that this will disable Ctrl+X (cutting) in your entire application. This can be worked around. Jan 20 at 9:22
  • 1
    @FajelaTajkiya: Mostly not. You still get the KeyPress and the KeyUp. Jan 20 at 11:44
3

Not an answer, but a comment, but I need to publish code, so...

You can test the current Shift-state using these functions:

CONST
  VK_ALT        = VK_MENU;
  VK_CTRL       = VK_CONTROL;

FUNCTION KeyPressed(VirtualKey : WORD) : BOOLEAN;
  BEGIN
    Result:=(GetKeyState(VirtualKey) AND $80000000<>0)
  END;

FUNCTION Shift : BOOLEAN;
  BEGIN
    Result:=KeyPressed(VK_SHIFT)
  END;

FUNCTION Alt : BOOLEAN;
  BEGIN
    Result:=KeyPressed(VK_ALT)
  END;

FUNCTION Ctrl : BOOLEAN;
  BEGIN
    Result:=KeyPressed(VK_CTRL)
  END;

But beware that you must call these function at the tail end of a keyboard event and before a new keyboard event occurs, as this call will return the state as it was from the latest keyboard event and not the one that necessarily were active at the time you want (if you call it outside the keyboard event handler).

6
  • Just wanted to mention that GetKeyState (according to the documentation) retrieves the state of the key when the input message was generated and is usually what you want. GetAsyncKeyState retrieves the "right now" value.
    – MarkF
    Jan 20 at 12:40
  • 1
    Yes, but that requires that you call it at the right time (ie. before the next key is pressed). I'll clarify it in the description...
    – HeartWare
    Jan 20 at 12:46
  • 1
    When testing for more than one shift key (i.e. CTRL+ALT) it is performance wise a better approach to call KeyPressed( VK_CTRL or VK_ALT ) instead of the other functions individually. Which shows how fast supposed helpers become futile.
    – AmigoJack
    Jan 20 at 13:48
  • @AmigoJack: Are you absolutely sure about that? VK_CTRL and VK_ALT are not bitmasks - they are key codes. VK_CTRL = $11 and VK_ALT = $12. (VK_CTRL OR VK_ALT) = $13 which is also the value of VK_PAUSE so how are we to distinguish between "VK_CTRL OR VK_ALT" ($13) and "VK_PAUSE" (also $13) being pressed, if we pass $13 as the value to KeyPressed??? Not to mention that your approach doesn't allow you to test for SHIFT and CTRL at the same time, as VK_SHIFT =$10 and VK_CTRL = $11 and (VK_SHIFT OR VK_CTRL) = $11 = VK_CTRL so the "VK_SHIFT" is ignored in that "OR".
    – HeartWare
    Jan 21 at 9:09
  • Virtual Key Codes: docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/win32/inputdev/…
    – HeartWare
    Jan 21 at 9:14

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.