15

I have a method similar to:

public static void DoSomething (string param1, string param2, SomeObject o) 
{
   //.....

   lock(o) 
   {
       o.Things.Add(param1);
       o.Update();
       // etc....
   }
}

A few points:

  1. Is locking in this way bad practice?
  2. Should I lock on a private static object instead?
  3. If so, why?
20

To minimize side effects, the object being locked on should not be the object being manipulated but rather a separate object designated for locking.

Depending on your requirements, there are a few options for handling this issue:

Variant A: Private locking object

Choose this if you just want to ensure that DoSomething does not conflict with a parallel instance of DoSomething.

private static readonly object doSomethingLock = new object();

public static void DoSomething (string param1, string param2, SomeObject o) 
{
   //.....

   lock(doSomethingLock) 
   {
       o.Things.Add(param1);
       o.Update();
       // etc....
   }
}

Variant B: Pass locking object as a parameter

Choose this if access to o must be thread-safe even outside of DoSomething, i.e., if the possibility exists that someone else writes a method DoSomethingElse which runs in parallel to DoSomething and which must not interfere with the lock block in DoSomething:

public static void DoSomething (string param1, string param2, SomeObject o, object someObjectLock) 
{
   //.....

   lock(someObjectLock) 
   {
       o.Things.Add(param1);
       o.Update();
       // etc....
   }
}

Variant C: Create SyncRoot property

If you have control over the implementation of SomeObject, it might be convenient to provide the locking object as a property. That way, you can implement Variant B without having to pass around a second parameter:

class SomeObject
{
    private readonly object syncRoot = new object();

    public object SyncRoot { get { return syncRoot; } }

    ...
}

Then, you just use lock(o.SyncRoot) in DoSomething. That's the pattern some of the BCL classes use, e.g., Array.SyncLock, ICollection.SyncRoot.

  • 2
    I believe that doSomethingLock is usually called syncRoot. – Sung M. Kim Aug 16 '11 at 13:16
  • I think I see why now. I cannot lock on the reference passed to the method because anyone using that object will also be able to lock on it. In effect, its the same as doing lock(this) but to a different class. – ghostJago Aug 16 '11 at 13:22
  • Lock objects should also be readonly. – Tim Lloyd Aug 16 '11 at 13:23
  • @Sung: Thanks for mentioning SyncRoot -- I've added Variant C which elaborates on this concept. – Heinzi Aug 16 '11 at 13:27
  • 1
    Variant C is the approach .NET types like IList use. – Paul Stovell Aug 16 '11 at 13:30
2

Just answering your 3rd question:

Imagine that latter on you decide to lock on another method parameter, maybe something like:

public void XXX(object o)
{
    lock(o)
    {

    }
}

You will have a hard time trying to see if there is a deadlock. You will need to check that the object passed as parameter to SomeObject o is never passed as parameter to object o at the same time.

0

Here is an example on how you should use lock:

class Account
{
    decimal balance;
    private Object thisLock = new Object();

    public void Withdraw(decimal amount)
    {
        lock (thisLock)
        {
            if (amount > balance)
            {
                throw new Exception("Insufficient funds");
            }
            balance -= amount;
        }
    }
}

And this means that you lock an Object that is a private variable and is used only for locking and nothing else,

You might wana look at this:

lock Statement (C# Reference)

and

Thread Synchronization (C# and Visual Basic)

  • I've seen this example from various sources and I understand that what you have said is best practice. But, specifically, what is wrong with locking the entire object thats passed into the method? After all, it is an object too. – ghostJago Aug 16 '11 at 13:13
  • If you habitually lock the object that is passed in, you increase the likelihood of creating a deadlock. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deadlock Essentially, two threads are waiting on a lock for an object that can never be released. – Richard June Nov 6 '17 at 13:20

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