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When dealing with MySQL database corruption, if the MYI index file is missing or if its header is corrupted you can't use a myisamchk command:

myisamchk --safe-recover --force --sort_buffer_size=2G --key_buffer_size=2G /var/lib/mysql/*/*.MYI

You have to do the repair from the MySQL command prompt with the use_frm option:

repair tbl_name use_frm;

Per MySQL documentation's on repairing tables

The USE_FRM option is available for use if the .MYI index file is missing or if its header is corrupted. This option tells MySQL not to trust the information in the .MYI file header and to re-create it using information from the .frm file. This kind of repair cannot be done with myisamchk.

With myisamchk, you can easily drop into each database folder and repair every table by using asterisks at the end of command:

/var/lib/mysql/*/*.MYI

You can't do anything similar from the MySQL command prompt.

There's a StackOverflow question with an answer that explains how to repair all tables within one specific database from the MySQL command prompt with a procedure:

CREATE DEFINER = 'root'@'localhost'
PROCEDURE MYDATABASE.repair_all()
BEGIN
  DECLARE endloop INT DEFAULT 0;
  DECLARE tableName char(100);
  DECLARE rCursor CURSOR FOR SELECT `TABLE_NAME` FROM `information_schema`.`TABLES` WHERE `TABLE_SCHEMA`=DATABASE();
  DECLARE CONTINUE HANDLER FOR SQLSTATE '02000' SET endloop=1;

  OPEN rCursor;
  FETCH rCursor INTO tableName;

  WHILE endloop = 0 DO
    SET @sql = CONCAT("REPAIR TABLE `", tableName, "`");
    PREPARE statement FROM @sql;
    EXECUTE statement;

    FETCH rCursor INTO tableName;
  END WHILE;

  CLOSE rCursor;
END

Is it possible to modify a procedure like this to loop through all your MySQL databases and repair every table within those databases?

I think this could be useful for anyone who has a large number of databases and runs into serious corruption.

1
  • Was your snarky comment really necessary? I am in a situation where it is not feasible in the foreseeable future to switch to InnoDB.
    – Drew
    Commented Aug 17, 2011 at 18:40

2 Answers 2

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mysqlcheck is a more convenient command-line interface to the MySQL CHECK, REPAIR, ANALYZE and OPTIMIZE statements.

mysqlcheck --repair --use-frm --all-databases
4
  • Like myisamchk, mysqlcheck does not work if the .MYI index file is missing or if its header is corrupted. It can only be done from the MySQL command prompt.
    – Drew
    Commented Aug 17, 2011 at 18:28
  • 1
    Haven't tested it myself, but the existence of the --use-frm option would seem to disagree. Mostly mysqlcheck is exactly equivalent to manually running the statements. Commented Aug 17, 2011 at 21:06
  • You're right! MySQL should probably update their documentation for REPAIR TABLE to let people know that mysqlcheck can also be used. Thanks for being persistent in telling me I'm wrong! "mysqlcheck is similar in function to myisamchk, but works differently. The main operational difference is that mysqlcheck must be used when the mysqld server is running, whereas myisamchk should be used when it is not. The benefit of using mysqlcheck is that you do not have to stop the server to perform table maintenance." Thank you!
    – Drew
    Commented Aug 17, 2011 at 21:48
  • Now that I can upvote. I just wanted to again thank you John for your answer. For anyone else reading this, in most cases, if a normal repair doesn't work, then mysqlcheck as suggested by John is the usually the best option. It seems to me to be a bit faster than the myisamchk command with use-frm. Make sure that you have taken down your webserver and no one is actively querying the database.
    – Drew
    Commented Jan 31, 2012 at 0:36
2

Here's my solution for when I had to fix all of the MyISAM files in my DB:

find ./ -name "*.MYI" -exec myisamchk -r {} \;

It traverses all of the databases.

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