2

Consider the following stream:

interval(1000)
  .pipe(
    take(5),
    concatMap((val) => {
      console.log(val, 'process');
      return of(val).pipe(delay(3000));
    })
  )
  .subscribe((val) => console.log(val, 'emit'));

As expected, 0 emits and hits the concat map. We see 'process' logged. During this time, 1 and 2 have emitted from the source. What i'd like to do is say "Now that my concatmap has finished, give me all items that are currently in the stream." So the next emit would be [1, 2], and we would see '[1,2] process'.

I am not sure how to achieve this. I have tried using a buffer and emitting every time concatMap emits, but it never gets an initial emit on that buffer, which resorted in hacking with timers and race and even then it did not work very well.

This is my current solution:

const dequeueSignal$ = new Subject();

interval(5000)
  .pipe(
    buffer(dequeueSignal$),
    concatMap((val) => {
      console.log(val, 'process');
      return of(val).pipe(
        delay(getRandomInt(20000)),
        tap(() => dequeueSignal$.next(null))
      );
    })
  )
  .subscribe((val) => console.log(val, 'emit'));

dequeueSignal$.next(null)

This is the closest I can get. This means that if theres nothing in the buffer, it still emits and the cycle continues. However, this has major drawbacks:

  • While nothing is in the queue, its constantly looping (the delay is only there for debug purposes. In my real scenario, this is a http call)
  • Relies on an external call to start the whole thing off.

As such, this feels hacky and brittle. Is there an operator set I can use to create this scenario?

2 Answers 2

1

The requirement can be covered by a custom operator which leverages concatMap but modifies its behavior as desired.

The custom operator has to keep some state:

  • a bufferedNotifications buffer where it stores elements it receives from upstream in case there is already a request on fly
  • a processing boolean which, if true, signals that there is a request currently processed, any notification received while processing is added to bufferedNotifications

It is important to note that a custom operator is a function that returns a function of type (observable: Observable) => Observable.

Having said that, let's look at the code of the custom operator

// the custom operator requires a function as input
// this function represents the actual processing that happens in the stream
// a type T is also added for better type checking and support
function concatBufferedMap<T>(processor: (val: T[]) => Observable<T[]>) {
  // as said above, the custom operator returns a function which expects 
  // an Obaservable as input and returns another Obaservable
  return (sourceObservable: Observable<T>) =>
    // the Observable to be returned is constructed using the Observable constructor
    new Observable<T[]>((subscriber) => {
      // this function will be called each time this
      // Observable is subscribed to.

      // here we define the variables holding the state
      // the state is initialized any time the Observable is subscribed 
      let bufferedNotifications = [] as T[];
      let processing = false;

      // the Observable returned by the custom operator transforms the
      // source observable via a pipe and then subscribes to it
      const subscription = sourceObservable
        .pipe(
          // the first thing we do when a value is notified by the 
          // source observable (i.e. by upstream) is to push the value
          // into the buffer
          tap((val) => {
            bufferedNotifications.push(val);
          }),
          // then we leverage concatMap to make sure that we concatenate
          // the various processings
          concatMap(() => {
            // if we are processing a previous request 
            // or if there are no items in the buffer 
            // just complete without notifying anything
            // concatMap requires that the value returned by the function
            // passed in as parameter is an Observable, so in this case
            // we return EMPTY, which is an Observable that does nothing
            // and immediately completes
            if (processing || bufferedNotifications.length === 0) {
              return EMPTY;
            }
            // otherwise, if there is no processing on fly and there are 
            // values in the buffer, we return the Observable created by
            // the processor function and we set the state so that it reflects
            // that we have started processing something
            processing = true;
            // we create a copy of the buffer so that the param passed
            // to the processor function is not altered by other potential
            // values which can be added to the buffer during the execution
            // of processor logic
            const _buffer = [...bufferedNotifications];
            // the buffer is also reset
            bufferedNotifications = [];
            return processor(_buffer).pipe(
              tap({
                complete: () => {
                  console.log("DONE concatMap");
                  // when processor completes its processing, the processing
                  // state variable is set to false
                  processing = false;
                },
              })
            );
          })
        )
        // in the subscription logic, we notify the subscriber (i.e. 
        // downstream) of the values notified by the processor logic
        .subscribe({
          next(value) {
            subscriber.next(value);
          },
          error(err) {
            // We need to make sure we're propagating our errors through.
            subscriber.error(err);
          },
          complete() {
            console.log("subscriber complete");
            subscriber.complete();
          },
        });

      // Return the teardown logic. This will be invoked when
      // the result errors, completes, or is unsubscribed.
      return () => {
        subscription.unsubscribe();
      };
    });
}

This stackblitz shows how the code works and should produce the expected results.

2
  • Will take some time I imagine to wrap my head around this one haha, but judging by the output this seems to be the result i'm after. Thanks for your effort.
    – plusheen
    Feb 2, 2022 at 12:52
  • Triggered by your case, here an article that develops in more details the solution based on a custom operator. If you want let me have your feedback.
    – Picci
    Jun 24, 2022 at 7:12
1

If I understand the problem right, I would proceed like this.

First we isolate the source stream. Consider that we use the share operator to make sure that the source$ stream is shared by the other Observables we are going to create later on starting from source$.

const source$ = interval(1000).pipe(share(), take(5));

Then I think that delay you put in the example represents some kind of processing performed by some kind of function, probably a call to an async service. If this is true, then we could have a process function which returns an Observable. A simulated version of this function could be this

function process(val) {
  return of(val).pipe(
    delay(3000),
    tap({
      next: (val) => console.log(val, "processed"),
    })
  );
}

now, if all these assumptions are true, then we can define a dequeueSignal$ Subject, as in your example, and then 2 different streams, a stream that takes just the first element notified by source$ and a stream that take all other elements, like this

const dequeueSignal$ = new Subject<any>();

const first$ = source$.pipe(
  first(),
  concatMap((val) => {
    return process(val).pipe(
      tap({
        complete: () => {
          dequeueSignal$.next(null);
        },
      })
    );
  })
);

const afterFirst$ = source$.pipe(skip(1)).pipe(
  buffer(dequeueSignal$),
  concatMap((val) => {
    return process(val).pipe(
      tap({
        complete: () => {
          dequeueSignal$.next(null);
        },
      })
    );
  })
);

dequeueSignal$ is used to trigger the release of the buffer stored with the buffer operator.

dequeueSignal$ is nexted in the first$ stream once and any time the afterFirst$ stream notifies.

A notification of dequeueSignal$ triggers the release of the buffered items.

Here a stackblitz that shows the code.

Probably a more elegant solution can be implemented as a variation of the mergeMap operator code, but it may look a bit more complex.

2
  • 1
    Thanks for the stackblitz. The result is basically identical to what I have now however. We have this looping process (if there's no items, theres no delay, so the process loops infinitely while waiting for more). I've updated your Stackblitz with a test case to show this (note the empty emissions): stackblitz.com/edit/rxjs-dwxg4v?file=index.ts The end goal would be for the emissions to pause until the next [0,1] comes through. The merge fork could be a possibility, but I really wanted to avoid 'hacking' this, I expected it to be a pretty common use case, but I may be wrong!
    – plusheen
    Jan 26, 2022 at 16:10
  • 1
    You are right, my response was not covering the requirement. I have added a new one with a totally different approach, hoping to provide some help. By the way, I also tend to think this could be a common use case, but did not come with any simpler solution than to create a custom Observable as you can see in the last answer I just added.
    – Picci
    Jan 29, 2022 at 8:32

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