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Here is a basic Spinlock implemented with std::atomic_flag.
The author of the book claims that second while in the lock() boosts performance.

class Spinlock
{
    std::atomic_flag flag{};
public:
    void lock() {
        while (flag.test_and_set(std::memory_order_acquire)) {
            while (flag.test(std::memory_order_acquire)); //Spin here
        }
    }
    void unlock() {
        flag.clear(std::memory_order_release);
    }
};

The reason we use test() in an extra inner loop is performance: test() doesn't invalidate cache line, whereas test_and_set() does.

Can someone please elaborate on this quote? Test is still a read operation and need to be read from memory right?

0

2 Answers 2

19

Reading a memory address does not clear the cache line.

Writing does.

So in a modern computer, there is RAM, and there are multiple layers of cache "around" the CPU (they are called L1, L2 and L3 cache, but the important part is that they are layers, and the CPU is at the middle). In a multi-core system, often the outer layers are shared; the innermost layer is usually not, and is specific to a given CPU.

Clearing the cache line means informing every other cache holding this memory "the data you own may be stale, throw it out".

Test and set writes true and atomically returns the old value. It clears the cache line, because it writes.

Test does not write. If you have another thread unsynchronized with this one, it reading the cache of this memory doesn't have to be poked.

The outer loop writes true, and exits if it replaced false. The inner loop waits until there is a false visible, then falls to outer loop. The inner loop need not clear every other cpu's cache status of the value of the atomic flag, but the outer has to (as it could change the false to true). As spinning could go on for a while, avoiding continuous cache clearing seems like a good idea.

3
  • I think the poster is more confused about CPU memory caching (i.e. a read may not actually access RAM) Jan 28 at 0:47
  • @CollinDauphinee Added a paragraph about CPU memory caching. Jan 28 at 1:03
  • 1
    Need to explain the low level combined testAndSet machine instruction and what it does to the cache line if it does not do the set. Jan 28 at 9:55
2

An (atomic) store need exclusive access to a cache line, but a plain atomic (release) store is still relatively efficient because store buffer 'caching' is involved; ie. immediate access to the cache line is not required.

In the spinlock example, the store (test_and_set) is an atomic read-modify-write (RMW) operation, which is significantly slower due to its nature; it both reads and writes in a single operation.
That requires instant access to the cache line while anything still pending in the store buffer must be flushed before it can proceed. In addition, the cache line must be locked to ensure exclusive access between the read and write. This is expensive, but it's required for the spinlock to guarantee exclusive lock access.

When multiple threads are stomping on the same test_and_set operation, the cache line keeps bouncing between CPU cores.
The inner loop (with the atomic read) is an optimization because multiple threads/cores can have read-only access to the same cache line ('SHARED' in the MESI cache coherency protocol). Once the inner-loop test operation reads false, the test_and_set in the outer-loop acquires the lock and only at that point, std::memory_order_acquire is needed. Using 'acquire' on the test operation in the inner loop is therefore pointless and a pessimization on weaker architectures where memory_order_acquire entails an extra CPU instruction (eg. PowerPC).
Since the inner loop is all about optimization, it should use std::memory_order_relaxed.

    void lock() {
        while (flag.test_and_set(std::memory_order_acquire)) {
            while (flag.test(std::memory_order_relaxed)); //Spin here
        }
    }

To optimize further, a standalone fence could be used so that the CPU fencing instruction is only called after a thread has acquired the lock flag.

class Spinlock
{
    std::atomic_flag flag{};
public:
    void lock() {
        while (flag.test_and_set(std::memory_order_relaxed)) {
            while (flag.test(std::memory_order_relaxed)); //Spin here
        }
        std::atomic_thread_fence(std::memory_order_acquire);
    }
    void unlock() {
        flag.clear(std::memory_order_release);
    }
};

Is having an inner loop a useful optimization? - perhaps.. it won't hurt, but if the inner loop is frequently reached, there is some contention and a spin lock is probably not the right tool.

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