2

I have been struggling for a long time to figure how to define a generator function of a ruler sequence in Python, that follows the rules that the first number of the sequence (starting with 1) shows up once, the next two numbers will show up twice, next three numbers will show up three times, etc.

So what I am trying to get is 1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 5, 5, 5, 6, 6, 6, 7, 7, 7, 7 etc.

I understand that the way to do this is to have two separate count generators (itertools.count(1)) and then for every number in one generator yield number from the other generator:

def rul():
    num = itertools.count(1) 
    repeator = itertools.count(1)
    for x in range(next(repeator)):
        yield from num

But if I hit next() on this function, I get back just the regular 1,2,3,4.. sequence...

Any help on this would be appreciated.

4 Answers 4

2

how about regular old python with no itertools?

def ruler():
    counter = 1
    n = 1
    while True:
        for i in range(counter):
            for j in range(counter):
                yield n
            n += 1
        counter += 1

in my humble opinion this is the clearest and most straighforward solution for these types of situations

5
  • Unfortunately, this returns first number once, second twice, third three times etc. which is not the solution to the problem, as we need first once, next two numbers twice, next three numbers three times etc.
    – MedvidekPu
    Jan 28, 2022 at 18:15
  • you're right, changed - but im honestly baffled by that response since it's easy to change that from here... actually wait that's not right yet lmao Jan 28, 2022 at 18:17
  • Thank you for the change! Almost there but I am not sure if there is an easy solution without using itertools tbh. This sequence is not the solution either, as it is supposed to return first number once, next TWO numbers TWICE and next THREE number THREE times
    – MedvidekPu
    Jan 28, 2022 at 18:23
  • yeah i reread the output... honestly would help if you gave a bigger output as an example but here you go this one works Jan 28, 2022 at 18:24
  • Looks less clever now, but still a good one! Jan 28, 2022 at 18:25
1

How about itertools.repeat?

import itertools

def ruler():
    num = rep_count = 0
    while True:
       rep_count += 1
       for i in range(rep_count):
           num += 1
           yield from itertools.repeat(num, rep_count)
2
  • 1
    I don't think this makes 1,2,2,3,3,4,4,4,5,5,5, etc but 1,2,2,3,3,3,4,4,4,4, instead Jan 28, 2022 at 18:07
  • @RichardKYu Oh sorry I misread the question! Jan 28, 2022 at 18:08
1

You can obtain such a generator without writing your own function using count() and repeat() from itertools:

from itertools import repeat,count

i   = count(1,1)
rul = (n for r in count(1,1) for _ in range(r) for n in repeat(next(i),r))

for n in rul: print(n, end = " ")

# 1 2 2 3 3 4 4 4 5 5 5 6 6 6 7 7 7 7 8 8 8 8 9 9 9 9 10 10 10 10 11 11 ...
1
  • I like this! Thanks Alain:)
    – MedvidekPu
    Feb 21, 2022 at 23:54
1

If you want to go all in on itertools, you'll need count, repeat, and chain.

You can group the numbers in your sequence as follows, with each group corresponding to a single instance of repeat:

1          # repeat(1, 1)
2 2        # repeat(2, 2)
3 3        # repeat(3, 2)
4 4 4      # repeat(4, 3)
5 5 5      # repeat(5, 3)
6 6 6      # repeat(6, 3)
7 7 7 7    # repeat(7, 4)
...

So we can define ruler_numbers = chain.from_iterable(map(repeat, col1, col2)), as long as we can define col1 and col2 appropriately.

col1 is easy: it's just count(1).

col2 is not much more complicated; we can group them similarly to the original seqeunce:

1         # repeat(1, 1)
2 2       # repeat(2, 2)
3 3 3     # repeat(3, 3)
4 4 4 4   # repeat(4, 4)
...

which we can also generate using chain.from_iterable and map: chain.from_iterable(map(repeat, count(1), count(1))).

In the end, we get our final result in our best attempt at writing Lisp in Python :)

from itertools import chain, repeat, count
ruler_numbers = chain.from_iterable(
                  map(repeat, 
                      count(1),
                      chain.from_iterable(
                        map(repeat,
                            count(1),
                            count(1)))))

or if you want to clean it up a bit with a helper function:

def concatmap(f, *xs):
    return chain.from_iterable(map(f, *xs))

ruler_numbers = concatmap(repeat, 
                          count(1),
                          concatmap(repeat,
                                    count(1),
                                    count(1)))
1
  • This is a very clean solution! Thanks:)
    – MedvidekPu
    Feb 21, 2022 at 23:53

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