7

I have code of this format:

fn f(n: usize) -> Result<Vec<usize>, String> {
  ...
  if some_runtime_condition {
    return Err("failure".to_string()); // LINE A
  }

  let mut v = Vec::with_capacity(n);
  while v.len() < n { // THE EXPENSIVE LOOP
    ... // complex logic building v
  }
  Ok(v)
}

and I found a 30-40% performance degradation when I changed line A to

return Err(format!("failure on {}", n)); // LINE A

Debugging (on release mode), I found that practically 0 time was spent formatting the error string, and instead the loop was 30-40% slower. As I understand, the only consequential difference between the two versions of line A (as far as the loop is concerned) is that I've allocated other data on the heap in the current scope with the format string.

I was able to solve the performance issue and keep the format string by changing my code to:

#[inline(never)]
fn the_loop(n) -> Vec<usize> {
  let mut v = Vec::with_capacity(n);
  while v.len() < n { // THE EXPENSIVE LOOP
    ... // complex logic building v
  }
  Ok(v)
}

fn f(n: usize) -> Result<Vec<usize>, String> {
  ...
  if some_runtime_condition {
    return Err(format!("failure on {}", n)); // LINE A
  }

  Ok(the_loop(n))
}

I hadn't expected that one heap allocation could hurt performance of different code, so why does this happen? And is there any better way to tell Rust's compiler how to handle this (other than #[inline(never)])?

7
  • 4
    Can you create a minimal reproducible example that demonstrates the problem? Inspecting the resulting assembly may be the best path forward here. Also could you elaborate how the profiled results were obtained, including what compilation settings (eg debug vs release)?
    – eggyal
    Jan 30, 2022 at 3:28
  • The formatting machinery is not optimized for performance. We cannot answer without MRE, but maybe it was consuming too much registers, hurting register allocation. Jan 30, 2022 at 3:29
  • "As I understand, the only consequential difference between the two versions of line A (as far as the loop is concerned) is that I've allocated other data on the heap in the current scope with the format string." — the original case of "failure".to_string() also performed a heap allocation; more likely it's that n is for some reason seen as being less stable, eg having to be reloaded from memory and tested on each iteration of the loop... but that's really rather peculiar so would definitely like to see the assembly here.
    – eggyal
    Jan 30, 2022 at 3:33
  • I've been having trouble creating an MRE because of the finicky nature of this issue - I need to trick the compiler into making the same mistake it's making in my more complicated code. I'm compiling for release.
    – mwlon
    Jan 30, 2022 at 3:50
  • 1
    @mwlon Rather than force your fast path to go through a function call, do you get the same perf improvement if you do a cold call? rust.godbolt.org/z/qErMjPfzY.
    – GManNickG
    Jan 30, 2022 at 21:23

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