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Is there a way to specify the type that goes into lists in Go? I am new to Go and most of what I see from Google searches mentions slices and I even meant to ask this question. I am stuck with the code with lists and can't modify to slices.

The documentation mentions that lists use an interface for the element.

I ask because I wrote this code:

a := list.New()
a.PushBack(x)

and got this error from the code that runs my file.

panic: interface conversion: interface {} is int, not fileA.TypeA

My hunch is to create a list that only accepts fileA.TypeA but am open to suggestions if there are other ways to fix this.

2
  • 2
    Are you sure you need a linked list structure and not just a slice?
    – rustyx
    Jan 30, 2022 at 13:17
  • I wish I could use slices but I can't change the code the calls mine. It might be a bad design but it is what I am stuck with. Jan 30, 2022 at 13:19

1 Answer 1

1

I guess when you're reading data from list, you use wrong type to convert data.

For example.

package main

import (
    "container/list"
    "fmt"
)

type User struct {
    name string
}

func main() {
    l := list.New()
    l.PushBack(User{name: "Jack"})
    l.PushBack(2)

    for e := l.Front(); e != nil; e = e.Next() {
        fmt.Println(e.Value.(int))
    }
}
// panic: interface conversion: interface {} is main.User, not int

The list have User & int two types, but if you only use int to convert all data in list, it'll throw panic error. You need to use correct type to convert.

Then you could detect type like following example.

package main

import (
    "container/list"
    "fmt"
)

type User struct {
    name string
}

func do(i interface{}) {
    switch v := i.(type) {
    case int:
        fmt.Printf("This type is int: %d", v)
    case User:
        fmt.Printf("This is User type: %#v\n", v)
    default:
        fmt.Printf("I don't know about type %T!\n", v)
    }
}

func main() {
    l := list.New()
    l.PushBack(User{name: "Jack"})
    l.PushBack(2)
    l.PushBack(3)

    for e := l.Front(); e != nil; e = e.Next() {
        do(e.Value)
    }
}

2
  • Everything is of the same type but I am now curious as to how I would be able to distinguish whether e is of type User or int in the for loop Jan 30, 2022 at 12:32
  • @heretoinfinity I update my answer, you could check it.
    – Jack Yu
    Jan 30, 2022 at 12:44

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