1

What I'm looking to achieve is each child having a diffrent color than the previous one (result would be gradient-like) by multiplying the color value with the child index.

Pseudo-code:

.parent > div:nth-child() {
    background-color: rgb(index * 10, 255, 255);
}
4
  • 1
    use a Sass loop for this, you cannot with CSS Jan 30 at 15:10
  • Do you know in advance how many children there are? Jan 30 at 15:12
  • @T.J.Crowder Yes, I do know the children count
    – lumetorm
    Jan 30 at 15:34
  • 1
    Then you can just make as many rules as there are children, each with an explicit number. A Sass loop would just generate that.
    – Noam
    Jan 30 at 17:56

2 Answers 2

1

NOTE: This answer does NOT use basic CSS, but rather shows an example of using a SASS @for loop to avoid handwriting each rule. If OP does not have GULP or another way to compile the SASS/SCSS, there are online compilers such as SassMeister or using CodePen, changing the settings on the CSS box to add a preprocessor:

enter image description here

And then viewing the compiled CSS:

enter image description here

@for $i from 1 to 12 {
    .parent > div:nth-child( #{$i}) {
        background-color: rgb($i * 20, 255, 255);
    }
}

You can enter the total number of children as the last value (the 12 in this example. This will output:

.parent > div:nth-child(1) {
  background-color: #14ffff;
}

.parent > div:nth-child(2) {
  background-color: #28ffff;
}

.parent > div:nth-child(3) {
  background-color: #3cffff;
}

.parent > div:nth-child(4) {
  background-color: #50ffff;
}

.parent > div:nth-child(5) {
  background-color: #64ffff;
}

.parent > div:nth-child(6) {
  background-color: #78ffff;
}

.parent > div:nth-child(7) {
  background-color: #8cffff;
}

.parent > div:nth-child(8) {
  background-color: #a0ffff;
}

.parent > div:nth-child(9) {
  background-color: #b4ffff;
}

.parent > div:nth-child(10) {
  background-color: #c8ffff;
}

.parent > div:nth-child(11) {
  background-color: #dcffff;
}
1

As one of the solutions, you can assign values directly from JavaScript. But if you really want to manage this through CSS, then you can force the elements to set indexes using JS and CSS Variables and using calc() the necessary calculations in CSS rules. Example below:

document.querySelectorAll('.parent > div').forEach((el, index) => el.style.setProperty('--custom-index', index));
.parent > div {
  height: 50px;
  width: calc(30px + 50px * (var(--custom-index) * 0.5));
  margin-top: 5px;
  background-color: rgb(calc(var(--custom-index) * 10), calc(var(--custom-index) * 40), calc(var(--custom-index) * 50));
}
<div class="parent">
  <div></div>
  <div></div>
  <div></div>
  <div></div>
  <div></div>
  <div></div>
</div>

But if you delete or add elements, then in this case you will need to re-run the script provided in the JS example to recalculate.

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