5

The following code compiles in both GNU gfortran and Intel ifort. But only the gfortran compiled version will run successfully.

    program fort_tst
        use iso_c_binding

        INTEGER, POINTER :: a(:) 
        TYPE(C_PTR) :: ptr 

        INTEGER, POINTER :: b(:) 

        ALLOCATE(a(5)) 

        ptr = c_loc(a) 

        CALL c_f_pointer(ptr,b,[5]) 

        DEALLOCATE(b) 
    end program fort_tst

The error in the Intel compiled code is :

forrtl: severe (173): A pointer passed to DEALLOCATE points to an object that cannot be deallocated
Image              PC                Routine            Line        Source             
fort_tst           000000000040C5A1  Unknown               Unknown  Unknown
fort_tst           0000000000403A17  Unknown               Unknown  Unknown
fort_tst           0000000000403812  Unknown               Unknown  Unknown
libc-2.17.so       00002AAAAB20F555  __libc_start_main     Unknown  Unknown
fort_tst           0000000000403729  Unknown               Unknown  Unknown

The gfortran code runs to completion. A quick valgrind check does not find any leaks.

Can someone confirm whether the code above is valid/legal code?

I am running

    ifort (IFORT) 2021.2.0 20210228

and

    GNU Fortran (GCC) 9.2.0
    Copyright (C) 2019 Free Software Foundation, Inc.

UPDATE :

What is interesting is that gfortran does the right thing, (i.e. deallocates only allocated memory), even when the user tries to confound it with improper index remapping, or a bogus shape argument. So the internal array descriptor is being properly copied over with gfortran's c_f_pointer.

4
  • 1
    Se the update of my answer regarding your UPDATE. Commented Jan 31, 2022 at 17:27
  • Makes sense that gfortran mimics the C malloc/free behavior. I guess I just didn't realize it was that explicit. I thought gfortran was a "native" fortran compiler?
    – Donna
    Commented Jan 31, 2022 at 17:44
  • 1
    It IS a native compiler. But all these compilers normally use the system memory allocators under the hood. In Linux most often the malloc()/free() pair from GLIBC (the GNU C library), but one could also use some other implementation or even a custom allocater. That means that allocate calls malloc under the hood and deallocate calls free under the hood. But does more than that, it also fills in various descriptor data fields. This is common to all compilers I know, including Intel. Commented Jan 31, 2022 at 17:48
  • 1
    This is similar to what new and delete do in C++, they will also most often call malloc and free under the hood. Commented Jan 31, 2022 at 18:01

4 Answers 4

4

The error is issued, because the compiler claims that the pointer that is being allocated was not allocated by an allocate statement.

The rules are (F2018):

9.7.3.3 Deallocation of pointer targets

1 If a pointer appears in a DEALLOCATE statement, its association status shall be defined. Deallocating a pointer that is disassociated or whose target was not created by an ALLOCATE statement causes an error condition in the DEALLOCATE statement. If a pointer is associated with an allocatable entity, the pointer shall not be deallocated. A pointer shall not be deallocated if its target or any subobject thereof is argument associated with a dummy argument or construct associated with an associate name.

Your pointer b was associated using the c_f_pointer subroutine. The error condition mentioned is the

forrtl: severe (173): A pointer passed to DEALLOCATE points to an object that cannot be deallocated

Now we have to be careful, the exact wording is

or whose target was not created by an ALLOCATE statement

The target arguably was created by an allocatable statement. And then went through this indirect chain of association. I am not such an expert language lawyer to be sure whether this makes the target to be applicable or not, when it passed through c_loc() and c_f_pointer().

Gfortran does not issue this error condition and then it works fine because at the end of the day, under the hood, what matters is that the address passed to the system free() function was allocated by the matching system malloc() function.

I think we can conclude that one of the compilers is wrong here, because the mention of the error condition is clear in the standard and either it should be issued or it should not. A third option, that gfortran just leaves it too work, should not happen. Either it is allowed, or an error condition shall be issued.


Re UPDATE: What gfortran does is really sending the address to free(). As long as the pointer is contiguous and starts at the first element, it will work in practice. The size is not necessary and is not passed to free(). The system allocator malloc()/free() stores the size of each allocated system in its own database.

There are even worse abuse cases that can happen and will work just by chance due to this, even if completely illegal in Fortran.

See this:

use iso_c_binding

character, allocatable, target :: a
type(c_ptr) :: p
real, pointer :: b(:)

allocate(a)

p = c_loc(a)

call c_f_pointer(p, b, [1000])

deallocate(b)

end
6
  • 1
    Yes: allocate(a(5)); b=>a(1:1); deallocate(b) is accepted quite happily by gfortran (and several other compilers). Commented Jan 31, 2022 at 17:32
  • I don't see this as such a terrible thing, actually. The above is simply a cooler way to doing what fortran has always allowed with array "reshaping" via subroutine calls.
    – Donna
    Commented Jan 31, 2022 at 17:41
  • 1
    @Donna Well, is is really horrible. a is not even an array. And the types may be mismatched (edited). And the b array is much bigger and any access would lead to a segfault. Fortran's reshaping is meant to be safe. Commented Jan 31, 2022 at 17:50
  • I agree - it is bad in the sense that if one isn't careful, invalid writes/reads can occur. But is it worse that what fortran has always allowed to slip past its compilers? e.g. remapping indices of arguments passed into subroutines? This has been the way memory has been managed in fortran for decades ...The index remapping with pointers just allows the user a way to do this without the need for a subroutine call.
    – Donna
    Commented Jan 31, 2022 at 19:20
  • 1
    @Donna This is really worse. Try placing all this into a subroutine locally. It will crash, because a is allocatabke and the compiler wil try to deallocate it automatically. Commented Jan 31, 2022 at 19:24
3

gfortran is arguably missing a diagnostics opportunity when it comes to the DEALLOCATE statement. ifort is arguably too conservative when it comes to the DEALLOCATE statement.

The error message from ifort is an explicit design choice prohibiting the pointer from C_F_POINTER appearing in a DEALLOCATE statement:

Since the resulting data pointer fptr could point to a target that was not allocated with an ALLOCATE statement, fptr cannot be freed with a DEALLOCATE statement.

There seems little in Fortran 2018 explicitly to support that restriction (even in the case where the target was created by an ALLOCATE statement), and ifort itself isn't consistent in applying it:

  use iso_c_binding

  integer, pointer :: a, b
  type(c_ptr) :: ptr 

  allocate(a)
  ptr = c_loc(a) 
  call c_f_pointer(ptr,b) 
  deallocate(b)

end program

However, consider the case

  use iso_c_binding

  integer, pointer, dimension(:) :: a, b
  type(c_ptr) :: ptr 

  allocate(a(5))
  ptr = c_loc(a) 
  call c_f_pointer(ptr,b,[4])
  deallocate(b)

end program

One would surely expect deallocation here to be problematic but this doesn't cause an error condition with gfortran: gfortran isn't carefully checking whether the target is deallocatable (note that it doesn't have to).

There is some subtlety in Fortran 2018's wording of C_F_POINTER (F2018 18.2.3.3)

If both X and FPTR are arrays, SHAPE shall specify a size that is less than or equal to the size of X, and FPTR becomes associated with the first PRODUCT (SHAPE) elements of X (this could be the entirety of X).

and whether "the entirety" of a forms a valid thing to deallocate but ifort's documentation is seemingly too strict and gfortran's checking is not going to catch all invalid cases. There is a case for talking to the vendor of each compiler.


That said, the use of a C_F_POINTER's pointer in a DEALLOCATE statement clearly is more prone to error than "simpler" pointers, and these errors are not ones where we can rely on a compiler to point them out. Even with a conclusion of "clearly this is allowed" I personally would recommend that one avoids this approach where possible without other bad things.

5
  • @francecalus Thanks for pointing out the c_f_pointer docs. That does clarify the situation, and I guess there is some logic to Intel's design choice. This just severely limits some basic use cases, especially with legacy code. Example : Fortran SUB allocates memory, C stores the pointers for later referencing; then a second Fortran SUB deallocates memory. A possible solution is to allocate everything in C, but this could require substantial rewriting of code for cases in which a large number of arrays must be managed.
    – Donna
    Commented Jan 31, 2022 at 16:24
  • 1
    It's certainly worth having a conversation about Intel with this. Note that the scalar example is valid in Fortran 2008, where the array one is only Fortran 2018. This could be just a temporary restriction while refined diagnostics are worked on. Commented Jan 31, 2022 at 17:06
  • What is the best way to contact Intel about this? I have seen the issue show up on numerous Intel related forums. In fact, my example above was borrowed from this post : groups.google.com/g/comp.lang.fortran/c/7n8APYUs3Xk
    – Donna
    Commented Jan 31, 2022 at 17:12
  • 1
    That newsgroup post captures some of the really quite subtle aspects (which I wanted to avoid bringing up). Regarding contacting Intel, when you acquired the software you should also have been told how to contact them. One way could be to use their forum. Commented Jan 31, 2022 at 17:37
  • 1
    I posted a comment on the Intel Forum : community.intel.com/t5/Intel-Fortran-Compiler/…
    – Donna
    Commented Feb 1, 2022 at 3:07
2

Usage of c_f_pointer is pretty standard behavior in case a Fortran derived type is to be passed to a C++ class as an opaque pointer type, see e.g. the following interoperable class:

module mytype_m
    use iso_c_binding
    implicit none
    private

    type, public :: mytype
        real, allocatable :: data(:)
        contains
        procedure :: destroy
        procedure :: init
        procedure :: printout
    end type mytype

    public :: mytype_print_c
    public :: mytype_init_c
    public :: mytype_destroy_c

    contains

    subroutine init(this,data)
       class(mytype), intent(inout), target :: this
       real, intent(in) :: data(:)
       call destroy(this)
       this%data = data
    end subroutine init

    elemental subroutine destroy(this)
       class(mytype), intent(inout), target :: this
       integer :: ierr
       deallocate(this%data,stat=ierr)
    end subroutine destroy

    subroutine printout(this)
       class(mytype), intent(inout), target :: this
       integer :: ndata,i
       ndata = merge(size(this%data),0,allocated(this%data))
       write(*,1) ndata,(this%data(i),i=1,ndata)
       1 format('mytype object has data(',i0,')',:,' = ',*(f3.1,:,', '))
    end subroutine printout

    subroutine mytype_print_c(this) bind(C,name='mytype_print_c')
        type(c_ptr), intent(inout) :: this
        type(mytype), pointer      :: fortranclass
        call c_f_pointer(this, fortranclass)
        call fortranclass%printout()
    end subroutine mytype_print_c

    subroutine mytype_destroy_c(this) bind(C,name='mytype_destroy_c')
        type(c_ptr), intent(inout) :: this
        type(mytype), pointer      :: fortranclass

        call c_f_pointer(this, fortranclass)
        if (associated(fortranclass)) then
            call fortranclass%destroy()
            deallocate(fortranclass)
        end if
        ! Nullify C pointer
        this = c_null_ptr
    end subroutine mytype_destroy_c

    subroutine mytype_init_c(this,ndata,data) bind(C,name='mytype_init_c')
        type(c_ptr), intent(inout) :: this
        integer(c_int), intent(in), value :: ndata
        real(c_float), intent(in) :: data(ndata)

        type(mytype), pointer :: fortranclass
        integer :: ierr

        ! In case it was previously allocated
        call c_f_pointer(this, fortranclass)
        allocate(fortranclass,stat=ierr)
        call fortranclass%init(data)
        this = c_loc(fortranclass)

    end subroutine mytype_init_c

end module mytype_m

that would be bound to an opaque pointer in c++:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

// Fortran interoperability
typedef void* mytype;
extern "C" { void mytype_print_c(mytype self);
             void mytype_destroy_c(mytype self);
             void mytype_init_c(mytype self, const int ndata, float *data); }

// Class definition
class mytype_cpp
{
    public:
        mytype_cpp(std::vector<float> data) { mytype_init_c(this,data.size(),data.data()); };
        ~mytype_cpp() { mytype_destroy_c(this); };
        void printout() { mytype_print_c(this); };
};

int main()
{

    // Print 8--size
    std::vector<float> data {1.,2.,3.,4.,5.,6.,7.,8.};
    mytype_cpp obj(data); obj.printout();

    return 0;
}

which, with gfortran-10, returns

mytype object has data(8) = 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, 5.0, 6.0, 7.0, 8.0

I don't have a chance to test with ifort, but it works seamlessly with gcc, how can this approach not be Fortran standard-compliant?

5
  • I have also used this idea for C wrappers of large legacy codes and it works flawlessly with gcc. So the Intel behavior really surprised me. But apparently, this is an Intel design choice, and not something they are are likely to consider changing. See my post on the Intel Forum : community.intel.com/t5/Intel-Fortran-Compiler/…
    – Donna
    Commented Feb 2, 2022 at 16:56
  • Can you provide a complete code (with main) so I can try out your code above?
    – Donna
    Commented Feb 2, 2022 at 17:01
  • 1
    I've just edited it now, works with gcc/gfortran 10 Commented Feb 2, 2022 at 17:18
  • 1
    Of course there's no certainty about what happens on the C++ side with that pointer, not messing up with the memory is fully up to the coder - but the original ALLOCATE statement for that object definitely took place on the Fortran side, so it should be standard compliant anyways Commented Feb 2, 2022 at 17:25
  • 1
    Your code works fine with Intel. The key idea, it seems, is that your C/Fortran pointer points to a scalar object (of type `mytype'), which does work in Intel. Wrapping the actual data array in a scalar object seems to be the correct way to handle this situation. Thanks!
    – Donna
    Commented Feb 3, 2022 at 0:15
1

Posts above inspired the following solution. The idea is to create a type that wraps the actual data array. Then, c_loc/c_f_pointer sequence works fine with a pointer to a scalar object. The data array stored in the type can be safely allocated, along with the array type itself.

MODULE arraytype_m
    TYPE, PUBLIC :: arraytype
        INTEGER, ALLOCATABLE :: data(:)
    END TYPE arraytype  
END MODULE arraytype_m


PROGRAM fort_tst
    USE iso_c_binding
    USE arraytype_m

    TYPE(arraytype), POINTER  :: a, b
    TYPE(C_PTR) :: ptr 

    ALLOCATE(a)
    ALLOCATE(a%data(5))

    !! Set to C-style pointer, and then copy back to Fortran pointer.
    ptr = c_loc(a) 
    CALL c_f_pointer(ptr,b)

    DEALLOCATE(b%data)
    DEALLOCATE(b) 
END PROGRAM fort_tst

This works with both Intel and gfortan, and is really a better solution than what I was trying to do.

Special thanks for @Federico for posting the C++/Fortran code that made this solution obvious.

Update : A complete code, which shows how the ptr above can be stored in C.

// C code
typedef void* arraytype;

void allocate_array(arraytype *ptr);
void deallocate_array(arraytype *ptr);
void do_something(arraytype *ptr);

int main()
{
    arraytype ptr;
    allocate_array(&ptr);    
    do_something(&ptr);
    deallocate_array(&ptr);
    return 0;
}

and the corresponding Fortran :

!! Fortran code
MODULE arraytype_mod
    TYPE, PUBLIC :: arraytype
        DOUBLE PRECISION, POINTER :: data(:)
    END TYPE arraytype  
END MODULE arraytype_mod

SUBROUTINE allocate_array(ptr) BIND(C,name='allocate_array')
    USE iso_c_binding
    USE arraytype_mod
    TYPE(c_ptr) :: ptr
    TYPE(arraytype), POINTER :: a
    ALLOCATE(a)
    ALLOCATE(a%data(5))
    ptr = c_loc(a)
END

SUBROUTINE deallocate_array(ptr) BIND(C,name='deallocate_array')
    USE iso_c_binding
    USE arraytype_mod
    TYPE(C_PTR) :: ptr
    TYPE(arraytype), pointer :: a
    CALL c_f_pointer(ptr,a)
    DEALLOCATE(a%data)
    DEALLOCATE(a)
END

SUBROUTINE do_something(ptr) BIND(C,name='do_something')
    USE iso_c_binding
    USE arraytype_mod
    TYPE(c_ptr) :: ptr
    TYPE(arraytype), POINTER :: a
    CALL c_f_pointer(ptr,a)
    a%data = 2.5
    WRITE(6,*) a%data
END 

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