236

In other words, is this Singleton implementation thread safe:

public class Singleton
{
    private static Singleton instance;

    private Singleton() { }

    static Singleton()
    {
        instance = new Singleton();
    }

    public static Singleton Instance
    {
        get { return instance; }
    }
}
  • It is thread-safe. Suppose several threads want to get the property Instance at once. One of the threads will be told to first run the type initializer (also known as the static constructor). Meanwhile all other threads wanting to read the Instance property, will be locked until the type initializer has finished. Only after the field initializer has concluded, will threads be allowed to get the Instance value. So no-one can see Instance being null. – Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jul 7 '14 at 12:51
  • @JeppeStigNielsen The other threads are not locked. From my own experience I got nasty errors because of that. The guarantee is that only the fist thread will start the static initializer, or constructor, but then the other threads will try to use a static method, even if the construction process did not finish. – Narvalex Aug 20 '18 at 13:06
  • 1
    @Narvalex This sample program (source encoded in URL) cannot reproduce the problem you describe. Maybe it depends on what version of the CLR you have? – Jeppe Stig Nielsen Aug 20 '18 at 19:23
  • @JeppeStigNielsen Thanks for taking your time. Can you please explain to me why here the field is overriden? – Narvalex Aug 21 '18 at 12:57
  • 2
    @Narvalex With that code, upper-case X ends up being -1 even without threading. It is not a thread-safety issue. Instead, the initializer x = -1 runs first (it is on an earlier line in the code, a lower line number). Then the initializer X = GetX() runs, which makes upper-case X equal to -1. And then the "explicit" static constructor, the type initializer static C() { ... } runs, which changes only lower-case x. So after all that, the Main method (or Other method) can go on and read upper-case X. Its value will be -1, even with just one thread. – Jeppe Stig Nielsen Aug 21 '18 at 13:18

10 Answers 10

182

Static constructors are guaranteed to be run only once per application domain, before any instances of a class are created or any static members are accessed. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa645612.aspx

The implementation shown is thread safe for the initial construction, that is, no locking or null testing is required for constructing the Singleton object. However, this does not mean that any use of the instance will be synchronised. There are a variety of ways that this can be done; I've shown one below.

public class Singleton
{
    private static Singleton instance;
    // Added a static mutex for synchronising use of instance.
    private static System.Threading.Mutex mutex;
    private Singleton() { }
    static Singleton()
    {
        instance = new Singleton();
        mutex = new System.Threading.Mutex();
    }

    public static Singleton Acquire()
    {
        mutex.WaitOne();
        return instance;
    }

    // Each call to Acquire() requires a call to Release()
    public static void Release()
    {
        mutex.ReleaseMutex();
    }
}
  • 51
    Note that if your singleton object is immutable, using a mutex or any synchronization mechanism is an overkill and should not be used. Also, I find the above sample implementation extremely brittle :-). All code using Singleton.Acquire() is expected to call Singleton.Release() when it's done using the singleton instance. Failing to do this (e.g. returning prematurely, leaving scope via exception, forgetting to call Release), next time this Singleton is accessed from a different thread it will deadlock in Singleton.Acquire(). – Milan Gardian Jun 25 '09 at 13:16
  • 2
    Agreed, though I'd go further. If your singleton is immutable, using a singleton is overkill. Just define constants. Ultimately, using a singleton properly requires that the developers know what they are doing. As brittle as this implementation is, it is still better than the one in the question where those errors manifest randomly rather than as an obviously unreleased mutex. – Zooba Jun 30 '09 at 5:25
  • 25
    One way to lessen the brittleness of the Release() method is to use another class with IDisposable as a sync handler. When you acquire the singleton, you get the handler and can put the code requiring the singleton into a using block to handle the release. – CodexArcanum Aug 19 '10 at 17:23
  • 5
    For others who might be tripped up by this: Any static field members with initializers are initialized before the static constructor is called. – Adam W. McKinley Dec 15 '11 at 16:25
  • 10
    The answer these days is to use Lazy<T> - anyone who uses the code I originally posted is doing it wrong (and honestly it wasn't that good to begin with - 5-years-ago-me wasn't as good at this stuff as current-me is :) ). – Zooba Feb 4 '14 at 21:45
82

While all of these answers are giving the same general answer, there is one caveat.

Remember that all potential derivations of a generic class are compiled as individual types. So use caution when implementing static constructors for generic types.

class MyObject<T>
{
    static MyObject() 
    {
       //this code will get executed for each T.
    }
}

EDIT:

Here is the demonstration:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var obj = new Foo<object>();
    var obj2 = new Foo<string>();
}

public class Foo<T>
{
    static Foo()
    {
         System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine(String.Format("Hit {0}", typeof(T).ToString()));        
    }
}

In the console:

Hit System.Object
Hit System.String
  • typeof(MyObject<T>) != typeof(MyObject<Y>); – Karim Agha Oct 28 '11 at 1:06
  • 5
    I think that is the point i'm trying to make. Generic types are compiled as individual types based upon which generic parameters are used, so the static constructor can and will be called multiple times. – Brian Rudolph Nov 3 '11 at 14:56
  • 1
    This is right when T is of value type, for reference type T only one generic type would be generated – sll Nov 28 '11 at 10:12
  • 1
    @sll: Not True... See my Edit – Brian Rudolph Dec 15 '11 at 15:59
  • 2
    Interesting but really static cosntructor called for all types, just tried for multiple reference types – sll Dec 15 '11 at 16:31
26

Using a static constructor actually is threadsafe. The static constructor is guaranteed to be executed only once.

From the C# language specification http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa645612(VS.71).aspx:

The static constructor for a class executes at most once in a given application domain. The execution of a static constructor is triggered by the first of the following events to occur within an application domain:

  • An instance of the class is created.
  • Any of the static members of the class are referenced.

So yes, you can trust that your singleton will be correctly instantiated.

Zooba made an excellent point (and 15 seconds before me, too!) that the static constructor will not guarantee thread-safe shared access to the singleton. That will need to be handled in another manner.

7

Here's the Cliffnotes version from the above MSDN page on c# singleton:

Use the following pattern, always, you can't go wrong:

public sealed class Singleton
{
   private static readonly Singleton instance = new Singleton();

   private Singleton(){}

   public static Singleton Instance
   {
      get 
      {
         return instance; 
      }
   }
}

Beyond the obvious singleton features, it gives you these two things for free (in respect to singleton in c++):

  1. lazy construction (or no construction if it was never called)
  2. synchronization
  • 2
    Lazy if the class is doesn't have any other unrelated statics (like consts). Otherwise accessing any static method or property will result instance creation. So I wouldn't call it lazy. – Schultz9999 Jun 11 '13 at 23:26
  • 1
    @ShmilTheCat: What does C++ have to do with this? – stakx Dec 26 '16 at 16:33
5

Static constructors are guaranteed to fire only once per App Domain so your approach should be OK. However, it is functionally no different from the more concise, inline version:

private static readonly Singleton instance = new Singleton();

Thread safety is more of an issue when you are lazily initializing things.

4

The static constructor will finish running before any thread is allowed to access the class.

    private class InitializerTest
    {
        static private int _x;
        static public string Status()
        {
            return "_x = " + _x;
        }
        static InitializerTest()
        {
            System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine("InitializerTest() starting.");
            _x = 1;
            Thread.Sleep(3000);
            _x = 2;
            System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine("InitializerTest() finished.");
        }
    }

    private void ClassInitializerInThread()
    {
        System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine(Thread.CurrentThread.GetHashCode() + ": ClassInitializerInThread() starting.");
        string status = InitializerTest.Status();
        System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine(Thread.CurrentThread.GetHashCode() + ": ClassInitializerInThread() status = " + status);
    }

    private void classInitializerButton_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        new Thread(ClassInitializerInThread).Start();
        new Thread(ClassInitializerInThread).Start();
        new Thread(ClassInitializerInThread).Start();
    }

The code above produced the results below.

10: ClassInitializerInThread() starting.
11: ClassInitializerInThread() starting.
12: ClassInitializerInThread() starting.
InitializerTest() starting.
InitializerTest() finished.
11: ClassInitializerInThread() status = _x = 2
The thread 0x2650 has exited with code 0 (0x0).
10: ClassInitializerInThread() status = _x = 2
The thread 0x1f50 has exited with code 0 (0x0).
12: ClassInitializerInThread() status = _x = 2
The thread 0x73c has exited with code 0 (0x0).

Even though the static constructor took a long time to run, the other threads stopped and waited. All threads read the value of _x set at the bottom of the static constructor.

3

The Common Language Infrastructure specification guarantees that "a type initializer shall run exactly once for any given type, unless explicitly called by user code." (Section 9.5.3.1.) So unless you have some whacky IL on the loose calling Singleton::.cctor directly (unlikely) your static constructor will run exactly once before the Singleton type is used, only one instance of Singleton will be created, and your Instance property is thread-safe.

Note that if Singleton's constructor accesses the Instance property (even indirectly) then the Instance property will be null. The best you can do is detect when this happens and throw an exception, by checking that instance is non-null in the property accessor. After your static constructor completes the Instance property will be non-null.

As Zoomba's answer points out you will need to make Singleton safe to access from multiple threads, or implement a locking mechanism around using the singleton instance.

2

Just to be pedantic, but there is no such thing as a static constructor, but rather static type initializers, here's a small demo of cyclic static constructor dependency which illustrates this point.

1

Static constructor is guaranteed to be thread safe. Also, check out the discussion on Singleton at DeveloperZen: http://www.developerzen.com/2007/07/15/whats-wrong-with-this-code-1-discussion/

0

Although other answers are mostly correct, there is yet another caveat with static constructors.

As per section II.10.5.3.3 Races and deadlocks of the ECMA-335 Common Language Infrastructure

Type initialization alone shall not create a deadlock unless some code called from a type initializer (directly or indirectly) explicitly invokes blocking operations.

The following code results in a deadlock

using System.Threading;
class MyClass
{
    static void Main() { /* Won’t run... the static constructor deadlocks */  }

    static MyClass()
    {
        Thread thread = new Thread(arg => { });
        thread.Start();
        thread.Join();
    }
}

Original author is Igor Ostrovsky, see his post here.

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