15

This has been asked here before, but several years ago, and there was no cross-platform solution at the time (other than the setTimeout solution, which is really not very handy).

I'd like to do onblur="foo(parm);" and have foo be able to determine which element now has focus.

I'm using regular javascript; no jQuery for this one, please.

Is that possible these days?

  • Well it is doable in jQuery, which means it's doable in Javascript. I have no idea though, good question. +1 – Madara Uchiha Aug 17 '11 at 16:19
  • Hmmm. Can you post the jQuery in an answer and maybe I can work backwards from that? – Jonathan M Aug 17 '11 at 16:20
  • 3
    @Daniel: Yes, I mentioned that in the post, but the answers at the time were not cross-platform. – Jonathan M Aug 17 '11 at 16:22
  • 2
    There's nothing not handy about setTimeout. It's the best solution, and the only one which actually works. All the others fail because the "active element" when the blur event is fired is not yet the one that was clicked or tabbed to: it will only receive the focus following another event, when the blur event's processing's done! – Tom Jul 22 '12 at 21:12
7

You can try something like this:

function whereDidYouGo() {
    var all = document.getElementsByTagName('*');

        for (var i = 0; i < all.length; i++)
            if (all[i] === all[i].ownerDocument.activeElement)
                return all[i];
}

EDIT:

function whereDidYouGo() { return document.activeElement; }
  • 2
    Hmmm. Interesting. Doing some reading on activeElement. Wouldn't I just be able to do elementWithFocus=document.activeElement; ? – Jonathan M Aug 17 '11 at 16:32
  • 1
    @JonathanM: lol, yup, I just grabbed jQuery's :focus filter – qwertymk Aug 17 '11 at 16:34
  • Yes, I think so. This seems to show it: help.dottoro.com/external/examples/ljmiswgp/activeElement_1.htm – Jonathan M Aug 17 '11 at 16:34
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    Excellent. Thanks much. Good teamwork between you and Rikudo. :) Give him some upvotes. :D – Jonathan M Aug 17 '11 at 16:37
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    @WolfgangAdamec -- apparently not. In some browsers, I'm getting the body returned if I don't use setTimeout. In IE8, no timeout needed. In FF 18.0.1, setTimeout is needed. In Chrome, it looks like an anchor doesn't get focus. jsfiddle-ige – ruffin Feb 1 '13 at 18:30
3

In jQuery, at the OP's request:

$(':input').blur(function() {
    $focusedElement = $(':input:focus');
    //Do stuff with $focusedElement
}
  • Thanks, Rikudo. It's a starting point. Anyone have ideas on how to devolve this to regular javascript? – Jonathan M Aug 17 '11 at 16:25
  • 2
    @Daniel: In the comments, I asked for this as a starting point. It's cool. – Jonathan M Aug 17 '11 at 16:26
  • 1
    You are better off using jQuery or some other JavaScript library because the good ones are functional across multiple browsers. – DwB Aug 17 '11 at 16:37
  • @DwB: Yes, but the activeElement solution accepted here is also cross-platform, so it's a legit way to go. If interested, see: help.dottoro.com/ljmiswgp.php – Jonathan M Aug 17 '11 at 18:53
2

Interesting question. The heart of the matter is - when does the 'focus' event fire, before or after the blur event? If it fires before the blur event, the problem is easy, because you can just store the current focus in a variable that your blur event can access.

However, at least in Chrome 13, it appears the blur event happens before the focus event. One possible solution.

Given the following HTML:

<input id="foo" value='foo' />
<input id="bar" value='bar' />

You can then:

var currentFocus;
var pendingBlur;

var foo = document.getElementById('foo');
foo.addEventListener('focus', function(){ 
    currentFocus = foo;
    if(pendingBlur !== undefined){
        pendingBlur();
        pendingBlur = undefined;
    }
});
foo.addEventListener('blur', function(){
    pendingBlur = function(){
        console.log('new focus:', currentFocus);
    };
});

var bar= document.getElementById('bar');
bar.addEventListener('focus', function(){ 
   currentFocus = bar;
   if(pendingBlur !== undefined){
        pendingBlur();
        pendingBlur = undefined;
   }
});
bar.addEventListener('blur', function(){
    pendingBlur = function(){
        console.log('new focus:', currentFocus);
    };
});

Basically, I just not the blur callback so it is handy for the focus event to call after we know about which element was focused.

Here is a working example on JSFiddle.

EDIT: This solution suffers from the problem that if you blur on the form by clicking on something other than another form element, the blur event never fires (since we wait for the focus event). The only way around that, that I can conceive, is using a timer to check if pendingBlur is defined, and if so, call it. At which point you don't really need the focus event to call the blur callback anymore...

  • Thanks, Matt. I'll have to digest this after lunch. :) – Jonathan M Aug 17 '11 at 16:38
  • +1 for considering the timing of blur() vs. focus() and testing it on chrome. However, a perhaps better approach to dealing with the lag between blur() and focus() may be to employ a setTimeout() with the function called by onblur. – Jonathan M Aug 17 '11 at 18:50
  • @Jonathan M, yes, I'd be inclined to use a timeout. I just avoided it given your request in the question :) – Matt Aug 17 '11 at 19:10
  • Sorry to throw you off of that. I wasn't necessarily against using setTimeout(), just the solution that involved it. That solution requires setting a variable for every onclick...very messy. Thanks much for your help. – Jonathan M Aug 17 '11 at 19:16

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