3

I have two dataframes like as shown below

import numpy as np
import pandas as pd
from numpy.random import default_rng
rng = default_rng(100)
cdf = pd.DataFrame({'Id':[1,2,3,4,5],
                   'grade': rng.choice(list('ACD'),size=(5)),
                   'dash': rng.choice(list('PQRS'),size=(5)),
                   'dumeel': rng.choice(list('QWER'),size=(5)),
                   'dumma': rng.choice((1234),size=(5)),
                   'target': rng.choice([0,1],size=(5))
})

tdf = pd.DataFrame({'Id': [1,1,1,1,3,3,3],
                   'feature': ['grade=Rare','dash=Q','dumma=rare','dumeel=R','dash=Rare','dumma=rare','grade=D'],
                   'value': [0.2,0.45,-0.32,0.56,1.3,1.5,3.7]})

My objective is to

a) Replace the Rare or rare values in feature column of tdf dataframe by original value from cdf dataframe.

b) To identify original value, we can make use of the string before = Rare or =rare or = rare etc. That string represents the column name in cdf dataframe (from where original value to replace rare can be found)

I was trying something like the below but not sure how to go from here

replace_df = cdf.merge(tdf,how='inner',on='Id')
replace_df ["replaced_feature"] = np.where(((replace_df["feature"].str.contains('rare',regex=True)]) & (replace_df["feature"].str.split('='))]) 

I have to apply this on a big data where I have million rows and more than 1000 replacements to be made like this.

I expect my output to be like as shown below

enter image description here

1
  • you have not explained how your replaced dumma=rare with dumma=1123 and dumma=849 in row #2 and 5 respectively. Perhaps you can expand b) by explaining how you selected values for replacement for each of the rare/Rare rows? Feb 7 at 14:36

3 Answers 3

1

Here is one possible approach using MultiIndex.map to substitute values from cdf into tdf:

s = tdf['feature'].str.split('=')
m = s.str[1].isin(['rare', 'Rare'])
v = tdf[m].set_index(['Id', s[m].str[0]]).index.map(cdf.set_index('Id').stack())

tdf.loc[m, 'feature'] = s[m].str[0] + '=' + v.astype(str)

print(tdf)

   Id     feature  value
0   1     grade=D   0.20
1   1      dash=Q   0.45
2   1  dumma=1123  -0.32
3   1    dumeel=R   0.56
4   3      dash=P   1.30
5   3   dumma=849   1.50
6   3     grade=D   3.70
0
1
# list comprehension to find where rare is in the feature col
tdf['feature'] = [x if y.lower()=='rare' else x+'='+y for x,y in tdf['feature'].str.split('=')]
# create a mask where feature is in columns of cdf
mask = tdf['feature'].isin(cdf.columns)
# use loc to filter your frame and use merge to join cdf on the id and feature column - after you use stack
tdf.loc[mask, 'feature'] = tdf.loc[mask, 'feature']+'='+tdf.loc[mask].merge(cdf.set_index('Id').stack().to_frame(),
                                                                            right_index=True, left_on=['Id', 'feature'])[0].astype(str)

   Id     feature  value
0   1     grade=D   0.20
1   1      dash=Q   0.45
2   1  dumma=1123  -0.32
3   1    dumeel=R   0.56
4   3      dash=P   1.30
5   3   dumma=849   1.50
6   3     grade=D   3.70
0
1

My feeling is there's no need to look for Rare values. Extract the column name from tdf to lookup in cdf. After, flatten your cdf dataframe to extract the right values:

r = tdf.set_index('Id')['feature'].str.split('=').str[0].str.lower()

tdf['feature'] = r.values + '=' + cdf.set_index('Id').unstack() \
                                     .loc[zip(r.values, r.index)] \
                                     .astype(str).values

Output:

>>> tdf
   Id     feature  value
0   1     grade=D   0.20
1   1      dash=Q   0.45
2   1  dumma=1123  -0.32
3   1    dumeel=R   0.56
4   3      dash=P   1.30
5   3   dumma=849   1.50
6   3     grade=A   3.70

>>> r
Id           # <- the index is the row of cdf
1     grade  # <- the values are the column of cdf
1      dash
1     dumma
1    dumeel
3      dash
3     dumma
3     grade
Name: feature, dtype: object
8
  • thanks, upvoted for the help
    – The Great
    Feb 7 at 14:43
  • Thanks. Same for you well documented question! Let me know if you need more explanation.
    – Corralien
    Feb 7 at 14:46
  • I will fix my answer because my feeling isn't right :)
    – Corralien
    Feb 7 at 14:49
  • while I realize now that there is no need to identify rare values (for this data), how would you know which records to replace? of course, column names are matching..So, you assume that all values other than rare/Rare/RARE will be exact match with Original value in cdf dataframe?
    – The Great
    Feb 7 at 14:49
  • Yes that's right but the last row transform grade=D to grade=A...
    – Corralien
    Feb 7 at 14:50

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