6

We are putting a process in place where all architecture changes must be documented.

Are there any standard templates for documenting alternatives and decisions?

10

Depends on how detailed / formal you want to be. In terms of a Decisions Register we'd normally use one doc per area / decision, although recently we've been experimenting with OneNote.

At the very least you want to record (for each option):

  • Option Description
  • Pros and Cons
  • Risks and Issues
  • Assumptions and Constraints
  • Points of Note

A succinct bullet-point list of pros & cons (etc) is usually sufficient - it doesn't need to be a big doc.

For a more in-depth / formal / complex scenario you'd want to go further, this is the format we were using in such cases:

Summary

  • Problem Definition
  • Solution Context
  • Assumptions
  • Constraints

Evaluation Criteria

(This is important as it sets out the criteria you used to score the available options, including weightings etc).

Summary of Recommendations

  • Summary
  • High-Level Comparison Table (This is good for providing an "at a glance" comparison for people who don't want to read a long document; and having a side-by-side comparison is a good idea anyway).

[Option 1…N]

  • Option Description
  • Pros and Cons
  • Risks and Issues
  • Assumptions and Constraints
  • Points of Note

Recommendation

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2

github:npryce/adr-tools uses this simple template

  • Title
    • Date
  • Status
  • Context
  • Decision
  • Consequences
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1

This depends on whether you use a specific architecture framework - most of them come with some sort of templates. If you don't use any, I would recommend the SPAMMED Architecture Framework - it is extremely lightweight. Even if you won't find this framework usable, you can still benefit from the templates it provides.

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1

In my company we have found that using the following format works well for us:

  • Context (What is the issue we're seeing that is motivating this decision or change)
  • Decision (What is the change that we're actually doing)
  • Consequences (What becomes easier or more difficult to do because of this change)

It is similar to how we structure our tests:

given a scenario, when I do X, I expect Y to be the result,

so I think that makes it more natural for us to write and read. YMMV.

Blog post of Michael Nygard doing something similar: http://thinkrelevance.com/blog/2011/11/15/documenting-architecture-decisions

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  • There is the tool adr-tools, which offers management of these architectural decisions in a source code repository. – koppor Jul 5 '17 at 16:31
1

We collect information regarding architectural decision records at https://adr.github.io/.

MADR - The Markdown Architecture Decision Records

MADR establishes an easy markdown format for architectural decisions.

The template reads as follows:

# [short title of solved problem and solution]

User Story: [ticket/issue-number] <!-- optional -->

[context and problem statement]
[decision drivers | forces | facing] <!-- optional -->

## Considered Options

* [option 1]
* [option 2]
* [option 3]
* ... <!-- numbers of options can vary -->

## Decision Outcome

Chosen option: [option 1], because [justification. e.g., only option, which meets k.o. criterion decision driver | which resolves force force | ... | comes out best (see below)].

Positive Consequences: <!-- optional -->
  - [e.g., improvement of quality attribute satisfaction, follow-up decisions required, ...]
  - ...

Negative consequences: <!-- optional -->
  - [e.g., compromising quality attribute, follow-up decisions required, ...]
  - ...

## Pros and Cons of the Options <!-- optional -->

### [option 1]

* Good, because [argument a]
* Good, because [argument b]
* Bad, because [argument c]
* ... <!-- numbers of pros and cons can vary -->

### [option 2]

* Good, because [argument a]
* Good, because [argument b]
* Bad, because [argument c]
* ... <!-- numbers of pros and cons can vary -->

### [option 3]

* Good, because [argument a]
* Good, because [argument b]
* Bad, because [argument c]
* ... <!-- numbers of pros and cons can vary -->

The template is available at https://github.com/adr/madr/blob/master/docs/adr/template.md.

Sustainable Architectural Decision

The blog post Sustainable Architectural Design Decisions proposes following text:

In the context of <use case/user story u>, facing <concern c> we decided for <option o> to achieve <quality q>, accepting <downside d>.

In some projects, we use the following extension:

In the context of <use case/user story u>, facing <concern c> we decided for <option o> and neglected <other options>, to achieve <system qualities/desired consequences>, accepting <downside d/undesired consequences>, because <additional rationale>.

Other Solutions

Other solutions, including markdown templates, are listed at https://adr.github.io/.

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0

I'd be happy even with mind-mapping accompanied with a detailed documents when necessary.

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