5

I have a C application running on cross platforms. In this program, I need to write a function which determines if the given date is DST or not.
Actually, i try to find DST begin-DST end dates in pure C. Is there any simple and standard way to do this?

  • Note that there are (as a general rule) two days per year that have both DST and not DST, depending on the exact time. – Vatine Aug 18 '11 at 12:01
  • You need both a date (and time) and a place to determine if it is DST. And DST is a political thing: you simply cannot rely on a few rules (or politicians) to determine DST of future dates. Did you know Egypt changed their clocks four times last year? – pmg Aug 18 '11 at 12:11
  • @pmg In my country, DST begins on the last sunday of March, DST ends on the last sunday of October. So i actually need to calculate last sunday of March and October for each year. – Fer Aug 18 '11 at 12:52
8
0

time.h provides tm structs with a tm_isdst flag. Use time to get the current time, localtime to get a tm struct with the time adjusted to the current locale and read the tm_isdst flag.

From the manpage:

tm_isdst  A flag that indicates whether daylight saving time is in effect at the
time described.  The value is positive if daylight saving time is in effect, zero 
if it is not, and negative if the information is not available.
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    @pmg i think that suits my solution. I have just tried to do a calculation and i have seen that tm_isdst flag is set correctly. localtime or mktime both set the tm_isdst flag so i can use this flag in my function. Thanks. – Fer Aug 18 '11 at 13:03
  • Note that "The local time zone and Daylight Saving Time are implementation-defined." (7.23.1/1 in the Standard) If you need to guarantee portability to may different implementations you shouldn't rely on that. – pmg Aug 18 '11 at 13:39
  • @pmg Nice caveat. Although I really don't understand what implementation-defined means in this context. The implementation should still give the correct results, right? – pmr Aug 18 '11 at 13:48
  • 1
    @pmr: I think it means a conforming implementation can, for instance, assume tm_isdst is always 0 and never even bother to check it for the various <time.h> functions or assume the timezone is GMT. Hopefully the results will be coherent, but (mildly) incorrect; maybe that's better than the actual incoherent, but correct, results given by politicians' ideas about time :) – pmg Aug 18 '11 at 14:09
  • any implementation like, we have an input value of time_t not systemTime/LocalTIme(CurrentTime) from the clock from but the user input and get that input time from user is DST or not. Thanks in advance. – Ayush joshi Jan 3 '19 at 6:09
0
0

The code is:

time_t rawtime;
struct tm timeinfo;  // get date and time info
time(&rawtime);
localtime_s(&timeinfo, &rawtime);
int isdaylighttime = timeinfo.tm_isdst;
| improve this answer | |
  • any implementation like, we have an input value of time_t not systemTime/LocalTIme(CurrentTime) from the clock from but the user input and get that input time from user is DST or not. Thanks in advance. – Ayush joshi Jan 3 '19 at 6:08
-1
0

Implementation is not allowed to assume that tm_isdst is always 0. It must provide correct data. If implementation cannot provide tm_isdst which is consistent with rules set in a country than it should set tm_isdst to negative value as specified in 7.23.1/4 in the same Standard.

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.