31

Should static field initialization be completed before constructor is called?

The following program provides output that seems incorrect to me.

new A()
_A == null
static A()
new A()
_A == A

The code:

public class A
{
    public static string _A = (new A()).I();

    public A()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("new A()");
        if (_A == null)
            Console.WriteLine("_A == null");
        else
            Console.WriteLine("_A == " + _A);
    }

    static A()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("static A()");
    }

    public string I()
    {
        return "A";
    }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
       var a = new A();
    }
}
1
  • FWIW, I'll mention that if one wants to defer some "static" initialization until a specific static field is called, a way to do so (for a field that is a reference type) is to have a private static field that starts out null, and then a public static getter or method that does the "initialization" only when null, then sets private field and returns it. Jun 24, 2018 at 0:06

5 Answers 5

30

This is correct.

Your static initializers, then the static constructor is run before your standard constructor, but when it runs, it's using new A(), so passing through your non-static constructor path. This causes the messages you see.

Here is the full path of execution:

When you first call var a = new A(); in your program, this is the first time A is accessed.

This will fire off the static initialization of A._A

At this point, A._A constructs with _A = (new A()).I();

This hits


Console.WriteLine("new A()");
if (_A == null)
    Console.WriteLine("_A == null");        

since at this point, _A hasn't been set with the returned, constructed type (yet).

Next, the static constructor A { static A(); } is run. This prints the "static A()" message.

Finally, your original statement (var a = new A();) is executed, but at this point, the statics are constructed, so you get the final print.

4
  • With all due respect... static constructor doesn't run first. The static field initializer runs first.
    – Prankster
    Apr 2, 2009 at 17:52
  • 2
    Construction of A._A happens in the static constructor. It's just that the compiler prepends all fields initializations in the static constructor (.cctor) before the code declared in C# static constructor.
    – Jb Evain
    Apr 2, 2009 at 17:58
  • 2
    @prankster: I was just trying to say that his static construction + initialization is all happening prior to his non-static construction. I reworded and edited to be more clear. Apr 2, 2009 at 17:59
  • @ReedCopsey So, as per my understanding, the compiler first tries to initialize the static field _A after which the compiler is forced to create an object which in turn executes the non-static constructor(different from the usual process where first all static members are executed - fields and methods), prints the write lines, comes back to the caller with a new object of A() and immediately before calling I(), compiler as per the default behavior executes the static constructor, prints the "static A()" and then finally the I() is executed and value "A" is assigned.
    – Thameem
    Apr 24, 2022 at 6:42
8

One extra side note - the C# specification (I'm looking at 4.0, but it's there in 3.0 too) says in 10.5.5.1 Static Field Initialization:

If a static constructor (§10.12) exists in the class, execution of the static field initializers occurs immediately prior to executing that static constructor. Otherwise, the static field initializers are executed at an implementation-dependent time prior to the first use of a static field of that class.

You have a static constructor, so the "Otherwise" clause does not apply. But I think it's relevant information to your question to know that if you don't have a static constructor, the static field initializers can be executed 'at an implementation-dependent time'. This could matter if your static field initializer is doing some type of data initialization or object creation which you rely on without accessing the static field itself.

It is esoteric, I guess, but I saw it happen today as the 'implementation-dependent time' appears to have changed between C# 3.0 and 4.0 - at least for the situation I was looking at. The easy solution of course is simple - just add a static constructor...

2
  • But note that spec says "prior to the first use of a static field of that class". That is, you can guarantee that all static initialization has been done, simply by accessing any static field. [At least that is what I have seen in practice.] Jun 23, 2018 at 23:52
  • I've just seen this vary between Debug and Release mode builds. Truly nasty stuff to find. Oct 3, 2019 at 14:14
1

I actually believe that it is doing what you think. Your test makes it hard to tell.

Your initalization for _A

public static string _A = (new A()).I();

First creates a new instance of A, thus your writings of new A() and _A = null. Because it was null when it started, as this is the initialization. Once initalized, the static constructor is called, which returns the new instance.

0

It seems the compiler is doing the expected.

1st - All static code is executed (fields first, then static constructor) in the class:

public static string _A = (new A()).I();

// and

static A()
{
    Console.WriteLine("static A()");
}

2nd - Class constructor is called:

public A()
{
    Console.WriteLine("new A()");
    if (_A == null)
        Console.WriteLine("_A == null");
    else
        Console.WriteLine("_A == " + _A);
}

You ask why this is possible. Well, in my opinion, an instance doesn't absolutely require that all class variables are initialized upon creation. It just requires they must exist. I think this particular case supports this thought because an instance is created before all static initialization is done.

-2

Yes, static fields initialization should complete before constructor is called. But you put compiler in the unnormal situation and it just can't obey this rule.

This is interesting trick, but it's not gonna happen in normal application.

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