2

I've attached the boost sample serialization code below. I see that they create an output archive and then write the class to the output archive. Then later, they create an input archive and read from the input archive into a new class instance. My question is, how does the input archive know which output archive its reading data from? For example, say I have multiple output archives. How does the input archive that is created know which output archive to read from? I'm not understanding how this is working. Thanks for your help!

#include <fstream>

// include headers that implement a archive in simple text format
#include <boost/archive/text_oarchive.hpp>
#include <boost/archive/text_iarchive.hpp>

/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
// gps coordinate
//
// illustrates serialization for a simple type
//
class gps_position
{
private:
    friend class boost::serialization::access;
    // When the class Archive corresponds to an output archive, the
    // & operator is defined similar to <<.  Likewise, when the class Archive
    // is a type of input archive the & operator is defined similar to >>.
    template<class Archive>
    void serialize(Archive & ar, const unsigned int version)
    {
        ar & degrees;
        ar & minutes;
        ar & seconds;
    }
    int degrees;
    int minutes;
    float seconds;
public:
    gps_position(){};
    gps_position(int d, int m, float s) :
        degrees(d), minutes(m), seconds(s)
    {}
};

int main() {
    // create and open a character archive for output
    std::ofstream ofs("filename");

    // create class instance
    const gps_position g(35, 59, 24.567f);

    // save data to archive
    {
        boost::archive::text_oarchive oa(ofs);
        // write class instance to archive
        oa << g;
        // archive and stream closed when destructors are called
    }

    // ... some time later restore the class instance to its orginal state
    gps_position newg;
    {
        // create and open an archive for input
        std::ifstream ifs("filename");
        boost::archive::text_iarchive ia(ifs);
        // read class state from archive
        ia >> newg;
        // archive and stream closed when destructors are called
    }
    return 0;
}

Example 2

void save_load_with_binary_archive()
{
    // binary archive with stringstream
    std::ostringstream oss;
    boost::archive::binary_oarchive oa(oss);

    Camera cam;
    cam.id = 100;
    cam.name = "new camera";
    cam.pos = 99.88;

    oa & (cam);

    // get binary content
    std::string str_data = oss.str();
    std::istringstream iss(str_data);
    boost::archive::binary_iarchive ia(iss);
    Camera new_cam;
    ia & (new_cam);
    std::cout << new_cam << std::endl;
}

7
  • 1
    The filename is the same: std::ofstream ofs("filename"); and std::ifstream ifs("filename");. Feb 13, 2022 at 4:02
  • Got it. What if it were using a std::ostringstream and a boost::archive::binary_oarchive, ostringstream does not take any file name args. I added a second example illustrating this. Do I always need to use the same string stream to recreate the object?
    – ianwt
    Feb 13, 2022 at 4:11
  • 1
    In the second example, first, the output archive oa serializes the cam object to a string-based stream oss. Then you create another string-based stream (this time, an input stream iss) and initialize it with the content of the previous (output) stream: oss.str(); returns a string, you save it into str_data and you provide this string to the constructor: std::istringstream iss(str_data);. Then you create an input archive ia from the newly constructed input stream (containing the contents mentioned). Finally, you deserialize from that input archive. Feb 13, 2022 at 4:24
  • 1
    No, as seen in both examples, you don't have to keep the same streams around, you just have to keep their contents somewhere. In case of files you'd open the same file later (perhaps even on a different run of the program, after user enters a filename to deserialize from, for example). In case of string-based steams, you could store the resulting string somewhere and then later deserialize from that. Serialization is encoding objects into a sequence of bytes; deserialization is recreating objects after decoding a sequence of bytes. Feb 13, 2022 at 4:59
  • 1
    Yes. And "saving the contents of a stream" doesn't imply a file. Out-archive doesn't care what kind of stream it's given: text_oarchive's ctor takes a ref to a std::ostream, so it could be a file stream (std::ofstream is derived from std::ostream) or a string-based stream (std::ostringstream also derives from std::ostream). In case of a string-stream, the resulting string could be copied to a std::string variable. Same story for in-archives: text_iarchive's ctor takes std::istream, be it a file or a string-stream. String-based in-streams are constructed from an std::string. Feb 13, 2022 at 6:19

1 Answer 1

1

Like others said, you can set up a stream from existing content. That can be from memory (say istringstream) or from a file (say ifstream).

All that matters is what content you stream from. Here's you first example modified to save 10 different streams, which can be read back in any order, or not at all:

Live On Coliru

#include <boost/archive/text_iarchive.hpp>
#include <boost/archive/text_oarchive.hpp>
#include <fstream>
#include <iostream>

/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
// gps coordinate
//
// illustrates serialization for a simple type
//
class gps_position {
  public:
    gps_position(int d = 0, int m = 0, float s = 0)
        : degrees(d)
        , minutes(m)
        , seconds(s) {}

  private:
    friend class boost::serialization::access;
    template<class Archive>
    void serialize(Archive & ar, unsigned )
    {
        ar& degrees& minutes& seconds;
    }
    int degrees;
    int minutes;
    float seconds;

    friend std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, gps_position const& gps) {
        return os << gps.degrees << "°" << gps.minutes << "′" << gps.seconds << "″";
    }
};

int main() {
    for (int i = 1; i <= 10; ++i) {
        gps_position const g(7 * i, 12 * i - 1, i * 24.567f / 5);

        // save data to archive
        {
            std::ofstream                 ofs("filename" + std::to_string(i));
            boost::archive::text_oarchive oa(ofs);
            // write class instance to archive
            oa << g;
        }
    }


    for (int i = 10; i > 0; --i) {
        // create and open an archive for input
        std::ifstream                 ifs("filename" + std::to_string(i));
        boost::archive::text_iarchive ia(ifs);

        gps_position newg;
        ia >> newg;

        std::cout << " i:" << i << " - " << newg << "\n";
    }
}

Prints

 i:10 - 70°119′49.134″
 i:9 - 63°107′44.2206″
 i:8 - 56°95′39.3072″
 i:7 - 49°83′34.3938″
 i:6 - 42°71′29.4804″
 i:5 - 35°59′24.567″
 i:4 - 28°47′19.6536″
 i:3 - 21°35′14.7402″
 i:2 - 14°23′9.8268″
 i:1 - 7°11′4.9134″

After finishing, the contents of each stream will persist in the files:

==> filename1 <==
22 serialization::archive 19 0 0 7 11 4.913399696e+00

==> filename10 <==
22 serialization::archive 19 0 0 70 119 4.913399887e+01

==> filename2 <==
22 serialization::archive 19 0 0 14 23 9.826799393e+00

==> filename3 <==
22 serialization::archive 19 0 0 21 35 1.474019909e+01

==> filename4 <==
22 serialization::archive 19 0 0 28 47 1.965359879e+01

==> filename5 <==
22 serialization::archive 19 0 0 35 59 2.456699944e+01

==> filename6 <==
22 serialization::archive 19 0 0 42 71 2.948039818e+01

==> filename7 <==
22 serialization::archive 19 0 0 49 83 3.439379883e+01

==> filename8 <==
22 serialization::archive 19 0 0 56 95 3.930719757e+01

==> filename9 <==
22 serialization::archive 19 0 0 63 107 4.422060013e+01

SIDENOTE: The comment // archive and stream closed when destructors are called was misleading in your question code because ofs was declared outside that scope block. This difference is important.

1
  • Be sure to read the SIDENOTE at the bottom. Perhaps this was even the source of your confusion?
    – sehe
    Feb 13, 2022 at 16:01

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